Get Your Degree!

Get information on programs from our featured schools.

Related Areas of Study

Biotechnology is an exciting field of study that is rapidly growing around the globe.  Biotechnology is a branch of biology emphasizing the utilization of living systems to develop or enhance products.  In other words, biotechnology manipulates living organisms or specific components within a living organism to create useful commercial applications and products.

Examples of biotechnology innovations and advancements include:

  • Pharmaceutical advancements to combat rare diseases
  • Improving crop yield and pest resistant crops
  • Discovering new bacterial strains
  • Industrial engineering advances
  • Reducing carbon emissions and innovating new biofuels
  • Producing renewable biomass & reducing fossil fuel emission
  • Improving water efficiency in everyday tasks
  • Food production free of allergens

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$42,520

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

12.82%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

79,300

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Biotechnology Degree

Harvard University is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. One of the top "Ivy League" universities, Harvard's reputation was built on its liberal arts curriculum, particularly at the undergraduate level, and has always boasted an acclaimed faculty of scholars in the liberal arts. It continues to offer excellent undergraduate programs, with 44 fields of study offered at the bachelor's degree level. Over the years, Harvard also has gained a reputation for its excellent graduate programs and professional schools.

Most departments offer a tutorial style of teaching and learning, with a good teacher to student ratio. Tutorials, which are taught individually or in small groups, are directed courses of study in a field of concentration.

Harvard University offers excellent facilities, including the largest university library in the world, many museums, and more than 20 scientific and laboratory centers.

The "prominent alumni" list for Harvard reads like a "Who's Who" of iconic figures from American and international societies, culture, politics, and nearly every field or industry over more than 100 years. The alumni list boasts 44 Nobel laureates, among other luminaries. From President John F. Kennedy to President Barack Obama, and composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein to cellist Yo Yo Ma, and author and activist Helen Keller to author-historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and diplomat Henry Kissinger, among others, the list is an impressive one.

History

The university's name came from its first donor, minister John Harvard of Charlestown. He died in 1638, leaving his library and half his estate to the institution of higher education that was established in 1636.

The history of Harvard University is a storied one. Those who wish to learn more about its history can visit the Harvard University Archives.

Academics

The academic calendar of Harvard University follows the semester format, with fall and spring "terms," and summer "school" (or session).

Colleges and Schools

  • Harvard Business School
  • Harvard College
  • Harvard University Division of Continuing Education
  • Harvard School of Dental Medicine
  • Graduate School of Design
  • Harvard Divinity School
  • Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • Harvard Law School
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Harvard School of Public Health
  • Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Student Life

Students at Harvard University have many student services available, and many activities and living options to choose from. Residential housing is offered, providing a small college atmosphere at the university. Each of the 12 residential "houses" is well staffed, and offers dormitories and dining halls, as well as libraries, social events and intramural athletic teams.  Off campus housing is also available.

There are nearly 200 student-run organizations, groups, clubs and programs on Harvard's campus. There are close to 100 plays or musical performances offered by students each year. Two student newspapers offer plenty of opportunity for involvement, in addition to the many journals that are also produced at the university. Community service is encouraged through two programs: the Phillips Brooks House Association and the House and Neighborhood Development (HAND) program.  Mentorship is strong at Harvard, and students living on or off campus have faculty mentors available to them through various programs.

The facilities available to Harvard students are among the best at any university in the world. There are nearly 14 million volumes in the Harvard library system, and roughly 100 collections. More than 20 buildings are dedicated to scientific research in the areas of astronomy, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology and physics.  The university has many museums on campus, housing renowned art collections.  Its natural history museum is also well known.

Traditions

In 1875, Crimson was chosen as both the school color for Harvard, and its nickname for athletics teams. The school chose white for its second school color the same year.

In 1884, Harvard athletes began the tradition of waving a little red flag during any game they play against Yale.

Athletics

"The Crimson" athletics teams of Harvard compete in numerous intercollegiate sports, and have won championships in many. The sports that Crimson athletes compete in include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Heavyweight Crew
  • Lightweight Crew
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Heavyweight Crew
  • Lightweight Crew
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

Although there is only one campus for Harvard University, its many buildings, divisions and schools are spread throughout Cambridge. Harvard's campus facilities are located on both sides of the Charles River in Cambridge.  The Harvard Yard, (or "The Yard") is at the center of the campus and is the hub of Harvard's campus activities.

Community Life

The charms of Cambridge, Boston and New England as a whole, are many. Cambridge offers the ambiance of a small town in New England with its town greens, grassy riverbanks along the Charles River and charming town squares offering wonderful restaurants, unique shops, sidewalk cafes, and more.

Boston is a cosmopolitan city vibrant with history and culture.  Cobbled streets and church spires of colonial times are juxtaposed against modern architecture and high rises, offering a diversity that most visitors find stimulating. Concerts and live performances in theatre and classical music, museums and galleries, out door recreation and a world-renowned waterfront offer many opportunities for activities and entertainment. Students and visitors alike will enjoy the many areas that are within easy distance of Harvard.

Acceptance Rate

4.64

Student to Faculty Ratio

7:1

Columbia University in the City of New York is a private research university in Manhattan, New York. Columbia University is the fifth oldest institute of higher learning in the U.S., founded before the American Revolution, and is an "Ivy League" university. A member of the Association of American Universities, Columbia University was the first school in the U.S. to confer an M.D. degree. It was also the first site in the United States where the uranium atom was split. Other "firsts" that came out of Columbia include the birth of FM radio, the laser beam, the first use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), among many more pioneering inventions and patents.

Columbia offers degrees at the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels, as well as professional degrees, in a comprehensive range of academic fields. It is ranked number one as a research university by the Center for Measuring University Performance. It shares first place in rankings with MIT and Stanford University. Columbia University receives fourth ranking overall among other universities in the nation, according to the U.S. News & World Report.

Columbia University has a particularly illustrious list of alumni, boasting more Nobel Laureates than any other educational institution in the world. Since 1901, when the Nobel Prizes were first granted, 79 Columbia University alumni, faculty, researchers and administrators have won the Nobel Prize. The first recipient was Theodore Roosevelt in 1901 (Peace), and the most recent was President Barack Obama in 2009 (Peace).

There are renowned Columbia alumni in nearly every career field, including nine Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, 29 Heads of State, 25 Academy Award winners, more than 100 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Award winners, at least 30 MacArthur Foundation Award winners, more than 40 National Academy of Sciences Award winners, and many more.

History

Columbia University in the City of New York was founded in 1754 by royal charter of England's King George II. It was founded as "King's College." It closed during the American Revolution, and reopened after the war in 1784 as "Columbia College." In 1857, Columbia College moved from its original location at Park Place, to 49th Street and Madison Avenue. It remained in this location for more than 40 years. In 1897, the school moved to its present location in Morningside Heights in Manhattan. Architect Charles Follen McKim designed the buildings at the new Morningside Heights Campus in a Roman classical or Athenian style. Many newer buildings now surround the original buildings on campus.

Academics

The academic calendar for Columbia University in the City of New York follows the semester format, with fall and spring "terms." There is also a Summer Study Abroad program in various locations, as well as several "Special Programs" abroad. The academic schedules for these programs vary, and further information should be obtained from the program administrators.

Colleges and Schools

Undergraduate students at Columbia University attend Columbia College (Liberal Arts degrees), The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Engineering and Applied Sciences degrees), or The School of General Studies (nontraditional Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees) on the Morningside Heights campus. Undergraduates will also have access to affiliated institutions such as Teachers College, Barnard College, the Union Theological Seminary, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, as well as the Julliard School.

The colleges and schools of Columbia University in the City of New York include:

  • Columbia College
  • School of General Studies
  • School of the Arts
  • School of Continuing Education
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of International and Public Affairs
  • Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
  • School of Social Work
  • Graduate School of Journalism
  • School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • School of Law
  • Graduate School of Business
  • College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Public Health
  • College of Dental Medicine

Student Life

There are numerous student groups and organizations at Columbia University in the City of New York, including the many fraternities and sororities that are active on campus. There are also many co-educational Greek organizations available. Greek Life has been active on the Columbia campus sine 1836. 

In addition to various academic, social, political, religious and military student organizations, there is a campus organization representing and supporting lesbian, gay and transgender students.

Community Impact (CI) is a non-profit community service organization on campus that involves Columbia students in assisting the disadvantaged communities of Morningside Heights, Washington Heights and Harlem.

On-campus housing is available, guaranteed for enrolled undergraduates. Residence halls are located at Columbia College, Hartley Hall, Wallach Hall, Livingston Hall, John Jay Hall, Furnald Hall and Carman Hall. Apartment-style housing is available in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Students at Columbia can enjoy some of the many performances from campus groups including the Columbia Players, King's Crown Shakespeare Troupe, Columbia Musical Theater Society, Black Theatre Ensemble, and the Columbia University Marching Band, among others.

Traditions

The Columbia University school colors are blue and white. The blue is a light blue commonly known as "Columbia Blue."

The school mascot is the lion.

An old tradition at Columbia University is "Orgo Night," a custom that involves the Columbia University Marching Band playing music around campus for 45 minutes, beginning at the stroke of midnight, on the eve of final exams to distract students from studying for their Organic Chemistry final exam.

Another old tradition, which began prior to the American Revolution, is the lighting of the Yule Log. A troop of "soldiers" dressed as the Continental Army, carry the Yule Log from the campus Sun Dial to John Jay Hall, where it is lit as people sing Christmas carols and read aloud from traditional Christmas books.

Athletics

The Columbia University "Lions" athletic teams compete in 29 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Morningside Heights Campus in Manhattan (New York, New York) is the primary campus for most graduate and undergraduate studies. This campus occupies more than six city blocks. The campus will soon expand into "Manhattanville," a neighborhood north of its current location. This new expansion will extend the Columbia campus into West Harlem, with new buildings housing programs for business, arts, and some of the sciences.

Columbia University Medical Center Campus is considered its second campus, and houses all of the health-related schools for the University. The Medical Center Campus is located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, 50 blocks north of the Morningside Campus. There are many hospitals nationwide and abroad associated with Columbia University's medical-health schools, and in New York these are New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York State Psychiatric Institute, the Payne-Whitney Clinic, and the Payne Whitney Westchester, among others.

A third campus for Columbia University is its Lamont-Doherty Campus, located in Palisades, New York, on the west bank of the Hudson River. This campus supports geologic and oceanic research, including seismic activity.

A fourth campus in Irvington, New York, supports the Nevis Laboratories.

There are additional Columbia University facilities throughout New York, and a satellite learning site in Paris, France, among others.

Community Life

New York City is a world-famous metropolis with many historic landmarks and sites, made up of many communities. Students attending any of the Columbia University campuses in the New York area will have easy access to all that the "Big Apple" has to offer, thanks to an excellent transport system.

Acceptance Rate

5.45

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

Brown University provides a variety of program options for students to assist them in their growth and development. The school is located in Providence, RI and operated as a private institution. Enrollment at Brown University exceeds eight thousand annually. Students may choose from several areas of study, including:

  • Social Sciences
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
Students applying for admission are asked to submit an application, transcripts, records, standardized test scores and any requested letters of recommendations, which will then be reviewed by the admissions office. Either the ACT or SAT exam must be taken in order to apply to this school. Scores between 29 - 33 on the ACT or 1920 - 2250 on the SAT are recommended to increase your chances for getting accepted. Competition runs high for admissions, given that only 9% of students who applied are accepted to the school. More information from the admissions office can be found via the school or from our secure portal by requesting information. The cost of tuition is approximately $46,000, but may change each year. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better understand their personal tuition costs. The cost of on-campus housing is around $7,400 for the year. Students at Brown University may qualify for aid which is usually scholarships, grants, and loans. The Brown University "Bears" compete in a number of intercollegiate sports through participation in the NCAA. Sports available may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Fencing (NCAA Division I-AA)
Students can visit the school's brown.edu to see additional information.

Acceptance Rate

7.07

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

University of Pennsylvania ("Penn") is recognized as America's first university. It is an urban university, internationally recognized as a great institution of higher learning and research. It is home to the nation's first medical school, and the center of technological invention. In 1946, the school released the first electronic, general-purpose digital computer. The school's founder, Benjamin Franklin, was noted for his many innovative inventions, including bifocal lenses and the lightning rod.

Penn ranks among the top 10 universities in the nation, and boasts a faculty of leaders in their fields. Among its acclaimed alumni, Penn boasts many innovators and pioneers, including 15 Nobel Prize winners, and the inventor of motion photography, Eadweard James Muybridge.

Penn offers an interdisciplinary approach to learning through many different programs including its on and off-campus study opportunities for cross-disciplinary or joint-major degrees at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. It also offers continuing education, distance learning, summer programs, international programs, study grants, and more.

History

The University of Pennsylvania was founded by Benjamin Franklin, who was known for his dedication to education and intellectual pursuits, as well as his commitment to public service. Founded in 1749, the university opened its doors in 1751 as the Charity School of Philadelphia. In 1874, the university added a teaching hospital to its growing programs and campus.

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Pennsylvania follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. It also offers a variety of special summer sessions and distance learning programs with flexible scheduling.

Colleges and Schools

  • Annenberg School for Communication
  • Graduate School of Education
  • Law School
  • Perelman School of Medicine
  • School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Design
  • School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Social Policy and Practice
  • School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Wharton School (Business)

In addition to its 12 colleges and schools, the University of Pennsylvania offers a long list of research centers and institutes to choose from.

Student Life

There are hundreds of student groups and organizations available for involvement at the University of Pennsylvania. Student organizations cover every interest and focus, including academic, cultural, environmental, governmental, recreation and hobby groups. There are also honor societies, graduate and professional organizations, performing arts groups, political organizations, religious groups, service clubs, social clubs, publications and media, and many fraternities and sororities.

Many student services are available, as well as on campus housing, dining and shopping.

Traditions

The school colors for the University of Pennsylvania are red, blue and white.

Athletics

The Penn "Quakers" athletic teams participate in a wide range of intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Sprint Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

As with most ivy-league colleges, all of Penn's 12 academic schools are located on a single campus.

Community Life

Penn is known for its picturesque campus, situated in the vibrant, cultural city of Philadelphia. A full calendar of activities and entertainment are available on campus year-round, but the city also offers a vibrant nightlife, many museums and art galleries, a wide range of top restaurants, and plenty of shopping and sightseeing in historic areas.

The Civic House is Penn's hub for community service, and its Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships is a central office for community initiatives and service.

Acceptance Rate

7.66

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

University of Chicago is a nonprofit private institution located in Chicago, IL and provides a large number of program options for students. Approximately fifteen thousand students enroll at University of Chicago yearly.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs University of Chicago offers:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Social Sciences
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences

The admissions process begins with the submission of an application, student records, and standardized test scores, which are then evaluated by admissions officials. Very common standardized test scores among applicants admitted to this school are within the range of 31 - 34 on the ACT, or 1400 - 1570 for the SAT exam. Competition for admissions among applicants is high, given that only 20% of students who applied are accepted to the school. More information regarding admissions can be found here.

The cost of tuition is around $47,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to use the school's tuition calculator to better estimate their cost of attending this school. Financial aid may be provided to students that meet the necessary requirements.

The mascot for University of Chicago is the "Maroons", and they participate in intercollegiate athletics through the NCAA. Available athletic programs offered may include but not limited to:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)
  • Football (NCAA Division III)
  • Soccer (NCAA Division III)

Students may visit the school's http://www.uchicago.edu to view additional information.

Acceptance Rate

6.17

Student to Faculty Ratio

5:1

Northwestern University is a private research university located near Chicago in Evanston, Illinois. Internationally recognized for its educational excellence, Northwestern consistently ranks in among the best in the country for its undergraduate programs.

Northwestern offers a comprehensive range of academic programs that lead to certificates, diplomas, degrees at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels, and professional degrees. The acclaimed faculty include members of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, among others.

The thousands of prestigious alumni of Northwestern include government leaders, and newsmakers from science, medicine, education, law, the media and performing arts. A few of Northwestern's more well-known alumni include Rahm Emanuel, the Mayor of Chicago, actor David Schwimmer, and Julia Wallace, editor of the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management consistently ranks among the top five business schools in the country. U.S. News & World Report considers the School of Law among the top 15 law schools, and the Feinberg School of Medicine in the top 20.

Northwestern's libraries are well-known for their holdings, which include millions of volumes, microforms, current periodicals and serials, and hundreds of databases and electronic journals.

History

Northwestern University was founded in 1851 to serve the Northwest Territory (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota). Land was secured for the university campus in 1853 on the shores of Lake Michigan. The land around the campus was developed, and the adjacent town was named Evanston in honor of John Evans, one of the University's founders. In 1855, classes at Northwestern University commenced with two faculty members and 10 students.

Academics

The academic format for Northwestern University follows the quarter format, with fall, winter, spring and summer quarters. The summer quarter is divided into three sessions of varying lengths.

Colleges and Schools

  • Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Communication
  • School of Continuing Studies
  • School of Education and Social Policy
  • Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Graduate School
  • Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications
  • School of Law
  • J.L. Kellogg School of Management
  • Feinberg School of Medicine
  • Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music
  • Northwestern University in Qatar

Student Life

There is always something to do on the Northwestern University campuses, whether it is active participation in one of the many student clubs or organizations, including fraternities and sororities, or exercising during intramural and club sports. Students can explore their interest in the arts by viewing art at a campus art gallery, catching a theatre performance or a concert. The recreation and fitness facilities at Northwestern are state-of-the art, and the events that occur on campus year-round always draw a big crowd.

On campus housing is available, including graduate housing and residential colleges. Off-campus housing is also available. There are many meal plans and dining options available on and around campus.

Traditions

The traditional school colors for Northwestern University are purple and white. The mascot is the Wildcat ("Willie the Wildcat"). This mascot was chosen in 1924 after a reporter referred to Northwestern's football players as "wildcats" in an article he wrote for The Chicago Tribune.  Since that time, all athletic teams at Northwestern have been nicknamed the "Wildcats."  There is a popular cheer team at Northwestern University, as well as a "Ladycats" dance team.

The Land of Lincoln Trophy

A relatively new tradition, since 2009 the Land of Lincoln Trophy has been given annually to the winner of the Northwestern-Illinois football Game.

The bronze Land of Lincoln Trophy is modeled after Abraham Lincoln's authentic hat, and designed by Dick Locher, cartoonist and artist. The bronze trophy sits atop a wood base measuring 14 by 14 inches. The trophy idea resulted from an online vote by Northwestern and Illinois fans, who had to select a new trophy to be given to the winner of their traditional annual game.

Athletics

The Northwestern University "Wildcats" athletic teams are charter members of the Big Ten Conference, and compete in 19 varsity sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

 

Satellite Campuses

Northwestern University has three campuses:

  • Evanston Campus
  • Chicago Campus
  • Doha, Qatar Campus

Community Life

Many of the schools and colleges at Northwestern University have programs that support and benefit the community. One example is the Chicago Community Engagement Program at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine.

Through this program, Feinberg students interested in participating in community health activities receive support, guidance and resources. Some of the community involvement opportunities include:

  • Research and service activities in Chicago
  • Feinberg student group activities
  • Career interest in Family Medicine and Primary Care
  • Special events, classes, activities, or projects
  • Global Health Initiative (GHI) travel awards in alliance with the Center for Global Health

Northwestern University encourages a dual focus on education and community service by providing strong academic support for engagement activities.

Acceptance Rate

9.05

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

GU is a nonprofit private university that has a large selection of degrees available for students to choose from. The school is located in Washington, District Of Columbia, in a predominantly urban area. The school maintains a Roman Catholic affiliation, which is evident in the role it plays in program curriculums and daily life at the school. Enrollment at GU is nearly seventeen thousand yearly.

Students can select from several areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Social Sciences
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences

The admissions process starts with the submission of an application, school records, and test scores, which are then reviewed by admissions officials. The majority of students admitted to Georgetown University achieve an SAT score within the range of 1290 - 1500, or an ACT composite score in a range of 30 - 33. Only 20% of applicants are accepted to the school due to the huge number of applicants and the intense competition for the limited enrollment spots. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

Tuition is approximately $46,000 for the year, though it may vary based on any number of circumstances. Students should check the school's net price calculator to determine cost. Housing may be available for those that want to live on-campus for a cost of $9,800 for the year. GU may provide financial aid for students who are eligible in the form of scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for Georgetown University is the "Hoyas", and they participate in intercollegiate sports through oversight by the NCAA. Athletic programs offered may include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AA)

Contact information, financial aid information, areas of study offered, and more may be viewed on school's website at http://www.georgetown.edu.

Acceptance Rate

14.36

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

Johns Hopkins University (JHU) is a public research university that is a world leader in education, research and medical healthcare. When it was founded in 1876 by benefactor Johns Hopkins, it was divided into the university and a separate hospital - The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Today the university has three major campuses: the headquarters "Homewood" campus in Baltimore, a campus in Washington, D.C., and a campus in Montgomery County, Maryland. Johns Hopkins University also maintains learning facilities throughout the Baltimore-Washington area and in China and Italy.

The Homewood Campus sits on 140 acres of green space and offers courses for part-time and full-time undergraduates, as well as programs for full-time graduate students. Part-time coursework is also available to master's degree students.

Johns Hopkins Institutions are comprised of the university and the Johns Hopkins Health System. Together, these institutions are the state's largest private employer.

Johns Hopkins programs rank first among U.S. universities in many areas, including federally funded research programs, the School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Johns Hopkins faculty members and their research colleagues have won more federal research and development funding than any other university in the U.S. since 1979.

History

Johns Hopkins University was opened in 1876 with the mission to provide "knowledge for the world."  From the beginning, Johns Hopkins administrators believed that research and teaching are interdependent, so both areas have developed at an even pace over more than 130 years.

Academics

The general academic calendar for Johns Hopkins University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. However, the summer semester is divided into several "Summer Sessions." There is a "Winter Intersession" offered in January.

Each of Johns Hopkins University's nine schools maintains separate academic calendars, which may vary somewhat from the general academic calendar. Students are encouraged to consult the academic calendar for their specific school within the university to determine their schedules.

Colleges and Schools

  • Krieger School of Arts and Sciences
  • Whiting School of Engineering
  • Carey Business School
  • School of Education
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • Peabody Institute
  • Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) 

The Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) is a division of the university that is equal to the nine schools, but with a non-academic, research-based mission. APL is located between Baltimore and Washington. It supports national security and pursues space science, exploration of the Solar System and other civilian research and development.

The schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing share a campus in east Baltimore with The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Peabody Institute, a professional school of music, is located on Mount Vernon Place in downtown Baltimore. SAIS is located in Washington's Dupont Circle area.  The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, the Whiting School of Engineering, the School of Education and the Carey Business School are based at the Homewood campus in northern Baltimore, which is considered the headquarters of Johns Hopkins University.

Student Life

The Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University is a community within a larger city for the students who reside there. Residential halls offer on-campus housing, and students on campus enjoy a range of meal plans and dining options. There are things to do around campus year-round, with outdoor movies shown at the quad in summer, an annual speaker series, and more than 360 student groups, clubs and organizations that cover every interest. The fine arts and performing arts communities are very active on campus, offering a full calendar of entertainment. For more ideas about what to do on campus, students may access the events calendar online at www.event.jhu.edu.

JHU students can access a host of services and resources online, where they will find links to student affairs, calendars, libraries, fitness and health centers, ministries, campus facilities, ID card services, and more.

The Arts and Culture at The Johns Hopkins University is thriving. Students can choose from some of the following:

  • Homewood Museum
  • Evergreen Museum & Library
  • Homewood Art Workshops Gallery
  • Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
  • WJHU, Johns Hopkins Student Radio
  • Ballroom Dance Club
  • Digital Media Center
  • Johns Hopkins Film Fest
  • Hopkins Symphony Orchestra
  • JHU Symposium on Foreign Affairs
  • Homewood Arts Programs
  • Barnstormers Theater Group
  • Johns Hopkins University Theatre

Traditions

The traditional school colors for Johns Hopkins University are light "Columbia" blue and black, with white as an accent color. The school mascot is a blue jay, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the Johns Hopkins "Blue Jays." The Athletic Department was founded in 1876.

Athletics

The Johns Hopkins "Blue Jays" athletic teams have won many state and national championships while competing in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Water Polo
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

  • Homewood
  • East Baltimore
  • Peabody Campus
  • SAIS Washington
  • SAIS Bologna
  • SAIS Nanjing
  • Applied Physics Laboratory
  • Washington, D.C., Center
  • Montgomery County
  • Columbia, Md.

Community Life

The Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute (UHI) is an initiative that forms a vital connection with East Baltimore. The UHI fosters University and community partnerships in health care, education and community planning. The UHI works with local residents, educators, philanthropic organizations, elected representatives and community leaders, in addition to the wealth of intellectual resources at JHU.

A community garden is underway on the Johns Hopkins at Eastern campus, due to the efforts of a small group of students and support from several university offices.

The garden was created for Real Food Hopkins, a student-run group committed to bringing local, sustainable, humane and fairly priced food to the Homewood campus and the surrounding Baltimore area.

There are many things for students and visitors to see and do in Baltimore, Maryland. The Maryland seafood is world-famous; there are many city festivals and events to enjoy, including Restaurant Week in Baltimore's Inner Harbor area or the Preakness Stakes. The Baltimore Orioles and Baltimore Ravens play at Camden Yards.

Other activities include the Art, Cultural and Historic Museums, the National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center, and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History, among others.

Acceptance Rate

11.17

Student to Faculty Ratio

7:1

Tufts University provides a variety of degree programs for students to assist them in their growth and development. The school is located in Medford, Massachusetts and operated as a private institution. Approximately 10,000 students are enrolled yearly at Tufts University.

Areas of study available at Tufts University include:

  • Social Sciences
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Visual And Performing Arts
  • Psychology

Students applying for admission are asked to submit an application, transcripts, standardized test scores and any requested application essays, which will then be reviewed by the admissions committee. Students may take either the SAT or ACT scores to be considered for admissions at this school. A score between 2040 to 2260 on the SAT, or 30 to 33 for the ACT is usually submitted among accepted students. Competition for admissions among applicants is high, given that only 20% of students who applied are accepted to the school. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is approximately $47,000 per year. Tuition prices may change for a variety of reasons, and therefore students should use the school's price of attendance calculator to get a better idea of their cost of attendance. On-campus housing is available for students, and generally costs around $6,800 each year. Students at Tufts University may be eligible for aid which is generally scholarships, grants, and loans.

The Tufts University "Jumbos" have a number of intercollegiate athletic programs through participation in the NCAA. Available athletic programs offered may include but not limited to:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Fencing (NCAA Division III)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division III)
  • Football (NCAA Division III)

Contact information, financial aid information, programs, and much more can be viewed on school's website at http://www.tufts.edu.

Acceptance Rate

14.95

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

The University of Southern California (USC) has two main campuses, both located in Los Angeles, CA.  USC's University Park campus is near downtown-metro Los Angeles, near the city's major museums.  The University Park campus is home to most of USC's professional schools and the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School and the School of Dentistry.  USC's Health Sciences campus is northeast of downtown Los Angeles and is home to the School of Pharmacy, the Keck School of Medicine and three teaching hospitals.  Many other USC programs are conducted at different locations in the Southern California area.

USC is the oldest research university in the West and continues to be a leader in this area with an award-winning faculty and strong medical-health and science programs that have given rise to many new ideas and new technology over the years. USC receives top ranking and federal funding for its research activity.

USC attracts many international students and also offers many study abroad programs and internships.  The university encourages collaboration, interdisciplinary studies, public service and professional education.  Through its flexible programs like "Renaissance Ideal," "Thematic Option," and many interdisciplinary majors and minors, USC encourages entering students to create their own major/minor study programs to further interdisciplinary endeavors and new ideas.

One of the great attractions of USC for many students is its distinguished faculty.  The university boasts many renowned innovators and award-winners including members of the National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.  In 2011, USC Professor and historian Dr. Kevin Starr was inducted into the California Hall of Fame.

History

Founded in 1880, the University of Southern California opened its doors with 10 teachers and 53 students.   In 1885, USC established its College of Medicine, which was the first in Southern California.  In 1888, USC Trojans played their first football game.

Academics

The University of Southern California's academic calendar follows the semester format, with a fall, spring and summer semester.

The University of Southern California (USC) offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, doctoral degrees as well as continuing and professional education.  USC also offers a Progressive Degree option to high-achieving undergraduates who wish to begin work on a master's degree while completing their requirements for a bachelor's degree.

USC offers hundreds of options for majors, minors and degree programs to undergraduates and graduates through many flexible study options.  Students can choose from several areas and departments to pursue a major or program of study including arts and humanities, social studies, natural sciences, engineering, computer quantitative, and technical sciences.

For students pursuing research, there are many research centers and institutes, as well as laboratories and research units to choose from at USC that include arts and humanities, social and natural sciences, engineering and technology.  Some key areas for research at USC include genomics, biomedical imaging, nanoscience, digital media and high-performance computing.

Colleges and Schools

The colleges and schools of the University of Southern California are located at its two primary campuses: University Park Campus and Health Sciences Campus.  The colleges and schools of USC are:

  • USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
  • USC Leventhal School of Accounting
  • USC School of Architecture
  • USC Marshall School of Business
  • USC School of Cinematic Arts
  • USC Annenberg School for Communication, Journalism
  • Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC
  • USC Rossier School of Education
  • USC Viterbi School of Engineering
  • USC Roski School of Fine Arts
  • USC Davis School of Gerontology
  • USC Gould School of Law
  • Keck School of Medicine of USC
  • USC Thornton School of Music
  • Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
  • USC School of Pharmacy
  • Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy
  • USC School of Policy, Planning and Development
  • USC School of Social Work
  • USC School of Theatre

Student Life

USC is a large university and there are a host of student services available to help students navigate campus life. There are "Academic Services" that include online resources, academic support, libraries and computing.  Through "Campus Life" USC offers countless campus activities and programs, groups and organizations for students to become involved in.  Other student resources include Career Services, Financial Services, Student Health Services, International Students and New Students services, as well as the many programs and services offered through Student Affairs.  Intramural sports and spirit groups are a popular way to get involved in campus life and meet other students.

There are at least 12 residence halls on the USC campuses and many more USC-owned properties nearby that provide housing to students.  USC has three main restaurants on campus that have a selection of menu plans and are conveniently located near the residence halls.

Athletics

Athletics are an important part of the college experience at USC.  The USC Trojans teams compete in the following intercollegiate sports:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its two main campuses, USC runs programs at several locations throughout Southern California (Marina del Rey, Orange County, among others) as well as educational centers in Sacramento, California and Washington, D.C.

Community Life

USC is located in the heart of Los Angeles with many important museums close by and a host of recreational facilities and attractions in the area.  The USC Arts & Events Calendar offers an award-winning selection of art exhibits, public lectures, music, theatre, and film.  Additionally, there are many cultural events and activities in the Los Angeles area, as well as the many tourist attractions offered by Hollywood and the entertainment industry.

USC has many partnerships with organizations and groups in its surrounding neighborhoods and communities, offering students many opportunities to get involved in community programs, campaigns and initiatives that benefit local children, families and community members.

Acceptance Rate

11.42

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

Originally established in Detroit in 1817, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor is Michigan state's oldest public university. It serves as the main campus for the University of Michigan, with regional campuses located in Dearborn and Flint. There are over 9,000 faculty members in 200 departments across all campuses.

U of M in Ann Arbor spans over 600 acres in combined area and has four main sections known as the North campus, South campus, Medical campus, and Central campus. All four areas house thirteen undergraduate and eighteen graduate schools and colleges in total.

The University of Michigan is also recognized as one of the top public universities worldwide and holds one of the highest budgets among research universities in the country. Its Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) alone has over 1,000 students and over 600 faculty members involved.

In direct collaboration with the U of M Medical School is the University of Michigan Health System consisting of three hospitals, 120 outpatient clinics, and several centers for medical research and learning. Its C.S. Mott Children's Hospital is known to be one of the best children's hospitals in the country.

Famous for its success in football and ice hockey, the U of M is represented by the Michigan Wolverines in intercollegiate athletic events. Sports activities are overseen by the Department of Recreational Sports. Other student organizations in the university include the Pops Orchestra, Men's Glee Club, and the Musical Society which is made up of the Choral Union and the University Orchestra.

Student housing within university grounds is the sixth largest in the country, providing room for over 12,000 students. The university is also home to a golf course, a number of museums, galleries, planetariums, the Nichols Arboretum, and the Matthaei Botanical Gardens.

Acceptance Rate

22.91

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

Northeastern University (NEU) is a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts known for offering interdisciplinary, experiential learning. Northeastern University offers a mix of experience-based learning programs that include a cooperative education program, student research, global learning and service learning. NEU has degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels.  It offers 94 undergraduate programs and 169 graduate programs.  NEU is expanding its research programs to encompass the areas of health, security and sustainability.

What is unique about Northeastern is its 100-year-old "Co-op" program. Short for "cooperative education", the Co-op approach to education at Northeastern provides students with experiences in the U.S. and abroad that foster the development of a global perspective, along with knowledge and awareness. Through the Co-op program, students engage in 18 months of professional experience at a co-op partner site in the U.S. or in one of 50 countries around the world.

The faculty members of Northeastern University bring real-world experience to the classroom, and take an interdisciplinary approach to their teaching and their research. Students at Northeastern have ample opportunity to participate in research with the faculty in all degree programs, with access to advanced research facilities on and off campus.  Online learning is also offered, with the same level of scholarship as the campus-based programs.

The mission of Northeastern University:

To educate students for a life of fulfillment and accomplishment, and to create and translate knowledge to meet global and societal needs.

History

Northeastern University was founded in 1898.

Academics

The academic calendar for Northeastern University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a summer "term."

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Arts, Media and Design
  • College of Business Administration
  • College of Computer and Information Science
  • College of Engineering
  • Bouve College of Health Sciences
  • College of Professional Studies
  • College of Science
  • College of Social Sciences and Humanities
  • School of Law

Student Life

Students at Northeastern can become actively engaged on campus through the more than 260 student clubs and organizations that are offered. There are media groups, honor societies, intramural sports clubs, academic organizations, performing arts and professional organizations, and more.  There are many fraternities and sororities, campus events, activities and student services.  There are many opportunities for community partnerships, volunteer service, and participation in the AmeriCorps program.

On and off campus housing is available, along with several options for dining and a campus grocery store.  There is a 24/7 escort service to ensure student safety for those traversing the campus at night.

Athletics

The "Huskies" (Husky) athletic teams of Northeastern compete in 18 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Ice Hockey
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Ice Hockey
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Community Life

The Northeastern University campus is located in the heart of Boston, and is accessible by public transportation. The Boston Logan airport is minutes away from campus, and many hotels are within walking distance or a short drive away.  Shopping, restaurants, entertainment and recreation are all within easy reach of the centrally located campus.

Acceptance Rate

18.05

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

Boston University (BU) is a top-ranked, private institution of higher education located in Boston, Massachusetts.  BU offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in more than 250 fields of study and is particularly known for its interdisciplinary programs, leading research, and excellent faculty.  Its faculty includes several Nobel Prize winners, a poet laureate, and a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation "Genius Award."

BU's main campus is its Charles River Campus, and its Medical Campus is nearby.  The total campus area is 133 acres, supporting 320 buildings, 487 classrooms, 23 libraries and more than 2,000 laboratories.  Despite its physical size, BU strives to have smaller class sizes, with a ratio of one teacher per 13 students.  The average class size for undergraduates is 27 students.

History

Boston University was established in 1869.

Academics

Boston University (BU) follows the semester academic calendar, with fall, spring and summer semesters.  BU offers 250 different programs of study from its 17 colleges and schools.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Graduate School of Arts & Science
  • College of Communication
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Fine Arts
  • College of General Studies
  • College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College
  • Metropolitan College
  • Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Education
  • School of Hospitality Administration
  • School of Law
  • School of Management
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Public Health
  • School of Social Work
  • School of Theology

Student Life

Boston University has 80% of its undergraduates living on campus, which means there is a strong student community on campus.  Additionally, BU has more than 500 student activity groups that include academic, social, athletic, artistic, scientific and religious interests. BU is host to many annual events, including lectures and debates, music, comedy and drama.

There are several student publications, as well as WTBU, the student-run radio station, that encourage student participation.  A good way for students to connect with others, navigate the academic requirements or find out what's happening on and around campus is to access "Student Central" online.  This online resource provides access to academic bulletins, course descriptions, registration information, student health services, libraries, the student union, student links, a blackboard, the BU Bus schedule, BU maps, BU Bookstore hours, important dates, classes and amenities available at the FitRec Center, and more.

Athletics

The Boston University athletics department participates in 23 varsity sports.  The team mascot is the Boston Terrier, and BU's athletic teams are known as "The Terriers."

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Crew
  • Cross Country
  • Ice Hockey
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field

Community Life

The BU community is vibrant and busy, with a full calendar of activities to choose from including exhibits, lectures, social gatherings, year-round events offered at the Agganis Arena, performances at the Huntington Theatre Company, and more.  The FitRec Center offers individual or group exercise classes and state-of-the-art facilities for fitness and recreation.

Acceptance Rate

18.94

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

University of Rochester is a nonprofit private institution located in Rochester, NY and provides a large number of educational opportunities for students. Approximately nine thousand students are enrolled annually at University of Rochester. A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Visual And Performing Arts
The admissions process begins with the submission of an application, student records, and test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions office. Most common test scores among students admitted to University of Rochester are between 28 to 32 on the ACT, or 1860 to 2140 on the SAT exam. University of Rochester admits around 40 percent of students applying. Of those students admitted, around 24 percent of students enrolled. More information from the admissions office can be found at enrollment.rochester.edu. The cost of undergraduate tuition is around $46,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. The price of on-campus housing is about $8,100 per year. This school may help with costs by offering financial aid for students who qualify as loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. The mascot for University of Rochester is the "Yellow Jackets", and they participate in intercollegiate athletics through oversight by the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)

Acceptance Rate

29.71

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

New York University's main campus is located in Greenwich Village. It is a private, non-sectarian, research university and the largest non-profit institution of higher learning in the US. Study abroad facilities are located in a wide variety of countries around the globe. New sites are planned for Abu Dhabi in 2010 and Washington DC in 2012.

History

New York University was established on April 18, 1831 by bankers, merchants and traders in order to provide young men with a higher education. They were to be admitted on merit alone, with no focus on social status or birthright.

On April 12, 1831, the New York State Legislature gave the school its charter and it was incorporated as the University of the City of New York. The name was changed to New York University in 1896 by popular demand. The first students were welcomed in 1832 and attended classes in rented rooms of Clinton Hall.

Academics

New York University is ranked 22nd of the world's top universities by the Global University Ranking. It is made up of 16 colleges, institutions and schools. When the university was founded, the only school was the College of Arts and Science.

Undergraduate schools include:

  • Education of Human Development
  • Gallatin School of Individualized Study
  • School of Social Work
  • Stunhardt School of Culture
  • Polytechnic Institute of New York University
  • Stern School of Business
  • Tisch School of Arts

Postgraduate schools include:

  • Institute of Fine Arts
  • College of Nursing
  • College of Dentistry
  • Institute of Study of the Ancient World
  • School of Law
  • Courant School of Mathematical Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Continuing and Professional Studies
  • Graduate School of Arts and Science
  • Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

New York University is the only private university in the US with two medical schools, as it also awards the degrees for Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Campuses

New York State University's buildings are situated on approximately 229 acres between 14th Street in the north, Broadway on the east, Avenue of the Americas to the west and Houston Street to the south. Washington Square Park is the core of New York University's buildings and has been since 1970. The Washington Square Arch is the unofficial symbol of the University.

During the 1990s, New York University became a double square university when a second community was established around Union Square. Other campuses and facilities include but are not limited to:

  • Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine
  • New York University Medical Center
  • Belleview Hospital Center

Athletics

New York University's sports teams are known as the Violets. Their colors are violet and white. Dictated by geography and history, Columbia University are their rival. The University's team mascot is the bobcat. Most of New York University's sport teams participate in the University Athletic Association and the NCAA's Division III.

Student Life

The governing student body at New York University is the Student Senators Council. The University has more than 350 clubs and organizations for students on campus. These include fraternities, sororities, sports teams and those that focus on arts, culture and entertainment.

New York University first formed a Greek community in 1837. Greek  life at New York University is governed by four boards.

Community Life

New York is known as The City That Never Sleeps and there is much to see and do. Take in a festival, enjoy nightlife, enjoy a Broadway show or visit Rockefeller Center or Central Park.

There are an abundance of free venues, such as Central Park Stage, Brooklyn Museum, BB King Blues Club and Grill, Studio Museum of Harlem, Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum. Be sure to check times for free admission and also check out other free venues. There's something for everyone in New York City.

Acceptance Rate

16.2

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

Brandeis University is a nonprofit private institution located in Waltham, MA and provides a large number of degree programs for students. Brandeis University has an annual student enrollment of over five thousand.

Areas of study offered at Brandeis University include:

  • Social Sciences
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Psychology

To be considered for admissions, students may be asked to fill out an application, write a personal statement, and submit any transcripts or test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions office. Most students accepted to Brandeis University earn an SAT score within the range of 1860 to 2170, or an ACT composite score within the range of 28 to 32. 40% of students that apply are admitted to this school, of which 24 percent choose to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at brandeis.edu.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is approximately $46,000 for the year. Tuition prices may change for a variety of reasons, and that is why students should visit the school's price of attendance calculator to identify their cost of attendance. The cost of on-campus housing is approximately $7,200 annually. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the required requirements in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

The Brandeis University "Judges" have a number of intercollegiate athletic programs through participation in the NCAA. Available athletic programs offered:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)

Contact information, admission forms, programs, and more can be viewed on school's website at http://www.brandeis.edu/.

Acceptance Rate

29.9

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

University of California - Irvine (UCI) is an institution of higher learning and research, and one of the fastest-growing campuses in the University of California system.  It is situated in the heart of Orange County, in Southern California. Consistently ranked among the nation's top universities, UCI is known for its top-rated academic programs and professional schools. Some of UCI's newer programs include public health, pharmaceutical sciences, nursing science, and its School of Law.

UCI offers more than 80 academic majors and 63 minors for undergraduates. UCI offers more than 100 academic disciplines at the graduate degree levels, with 53 master's degree programs, and 45 doctoral programs. Professional degree programs include the M.D., Ed.D. and J.D. UCI provides graduate students with many opportunities to participate in research initiatives and interdisciplinary programs.

UCI is known as one of the top research universities in the world, thanks to a distinguished faculty of scholars and scientists. Included among the faculty are two Nobel laureates, two Medal of Science recipients, more than 20 National Academy of Science members, among others. UCI faculty are also acclaimed in the arts, literature and other disciplines, with three Pulitzer Prize winners, more than 50 Fulbright scholars, and nearly 40 Guggenheim Fellows, among others.

The Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UCI is the first in the UC System, and is one of the fastest-growing programs of its kind in the U.S.

UCI also offers an Extension program for continuing education focusing on professional and personal enrichment.

History

The Irvine Company contributed 1,000 acres of land for the University of California, Irvine campus in 1960. UCI officially opened in 1965 with eight buildings on its campus. Over the years, many renowned architects contributed to additional buildings at the UCI campus.

There were nearly 120 faculty members and just over 1,500 students enrolled on campus when the school opened.

Academics

The academic calendar of the University of California - Irvine follows the quarter format, with fall, winter, spring and summer quarters.

Colleges and Schools

The University of California - Irvine, refers to its departments, colleges, schools and programs as "Academic Units," which are:

  • Claire Trevor School of the Arts
  • School of Biological Sciences
  • The Paul Merage School of Business
  • Department of Education
  • The Henry Samueli School of Engineering
  • College of Health Sciences
  • School of Humanities
  • Donald Bren School of Information & Computer Sciences
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • Program in Nursing Science
  • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • School of Physical Sciences
  • Program in Public Health
  • School of Social Ecology
  • School of Social Sciences

 UCI also has numerous research centers and institutes.

Student Life

The Student Affairs Office at the University of California - Irvine offers a range of student services that are gathered in clusters: Auxiliary Services, Campus Recreation, Counseling Services, Health Services, Enrollment Services, Dean of Students and Student Housing.

The Anteater Recreation Center (ARC) offers a host of student activities and amenities, including fitness facilities, activity rooms, family/children's time, an aquatics plaza, a rock wall, roller rink, multiple intramural sports clubs, many social, academic and cultural clubs, cooking and nutrition classes, dance classes, yoga, swimming lessons, team building and leadership programs, and more.

On campus student housing is available, along with a range of dining services.

Traditions

The school colors are blue and gold, and the school mascot is the anteater. When the UCI was founded in 1965, students voted for their favorite mascot. The anteater won over the other possibilities that were promoted, including the unicorns, eagles, golden bears, and sea hawks, among others.

Athletics

UCI "Anteater" athletic teams have earned 26 national titles in nine sports. Anteaters have won more than 60 individual national titles. More than 40 "Anteater" athletes have competed in the Olympics.  The UCI Anteater athletics teams participate in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

 Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

UCI is located in the Irvine, California, which has been voted the "safest city in America" for several years running. The UCI campus offers all the best of California, including nearby beaches, mountains, deserts, and plenty of entertainment and culture.

UC Irvine is Orange County's largest employer, and has a significant economic impact on the area. The campus community of UC Irvine is founded on several core principles: respect, intellectual curiosity, integrity, commitment, empathy, appreciation, and fun.

UCI's faculty, students and staff contribute to the community through programs that address social issues. The UC Irvine Medical Center and UC Irvine Douglas Hospital offer cutting-edge medicine and the latest technologies to the area's citizens.

UCI engages the community through many public events and activities, including campus performances and speaking engagements that are open to the public. A recent headliner was the His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Acceptance Rate

26.54

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

University of California - Davis (UCD), located in the northern city of Davis, California, offers the largest variety of degree programs among the University of California campuses.  UC Davis's programs are nationally ranked, thanks in part to the universities award-winning faculty.  UC Davis offers more than 180 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and specializations.

The agricultural and environmental sciences programs are particularly strong at UC Davis, and since its inception, it has continued to have a reputation as a good "farming school."

History

UC Davis was conceived in 1905 when Governor George Pardee signed into law an act to establish a university-level farm school of agricultural instruction and research within the University of California system.  In 1908, the first students of the University Farm School arrived in what was then known as "Davisville."

Academics

The academic calendar of University of California, Davis follows the academic quarter format, with fall, winter and spring quarters.  Summer sessions are also offered, and evening classes are offered through UC Davis Extension.

Colleges and Schools

The colleges and professional schools of University of California, Davis offer more than 100 undergraduate degree programs and 80 graduate degree programs.

  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • College of Biological Sciences
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Letters and Science
  • The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing
  • Graduate School of Management
  • School of Education
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Veterinary Medicine

Student Life

There are many campus activities and resources available for UC Davis students including numerous clubs and organizations, more than one campus student union, the Graduate Student Association, the Cal Aggie Marching Band, music ensembles, dance and athletic groups, and more.  There is student housing, and university dining services include a coffee house and a café and pub. Student amenities include a variety of health services and academic support services.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are many chapters of fraternities and sororities available at UC Davis, and the Student Housing Greek Life Office offers support.  The mission of the Office of Greek Life is to foster a diverse and inclusive Greek community, empower students to develop leadership skills, and build strong relationships between Greek organizations and with the surrounding community.

Athletics

The UC Davis "Aggies" athletics teams compete in many intercollegiate sports including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Water Polo

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross County
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

The city of Davis, California offers a full community calendar of activities including "Scrabble at Picnic in the Park," "Spring Plant Sale at the UC Davis Arboretum," as well as art exhibits, musical and dance performances, and more.

Acceptance Rate

38.87

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

The University of Georgia (UGA) is a highly diversified research university located in Athens, Georgia.  There are many international students at UGA, as well as nationals and locals from within the state of Georgia.

The UGA offers bachelor's, master's, doctoral and professional degrees in a broad range of majors including the arts, humanities, social sciences, biological sciences, physical sciences, agricultural and environmental sciences, business, ecology, environmental design, family and consumer sciences forest resources, journalism and mass communication, education, law, pharmacy, public health, social work and veterinary medicine.

There are many continuing education students at UGA, and the university encourages economic and social development as well as community involvement through its experiment stations and programs in public service and technology transfer.

History

Georgia was the first state in the U.S. to charter at state-supported university in 1785. Studying a curriculum of traditional classical studies, the first class graduated in 1804. The curriculum expanded in 1843 to include law, and much later to include agriculture and mechanical arts. Through the years, sixteen colleges and schools were established within the UGA to provide programs in teaching, research and service.  Today, the UGA is part of the University System of Georgia, and governed by the board of regents.

Academics

The UGA follows the semester academic calendar, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

There are 22 bachelor's degrees offered at UGA with concentrations in 140 fields. The university offers 34 master's degrees (124 concentrations), and nearly 20 Educational Specialist degrees.  There are four different doctoral degree designations (Ph.D., Ed.D., D.M.A. and D.P.A.) offered in 91 areas.  Professional degrees at UGA include law, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine.

UGA also offers more than 170 Study Abroad or Foreign Exchange programs.

The university's OASIS program allows you to register for classes, view class schedules and student-related information online.

UGA also has several Distance Learning degrees and certificates including a Master of Education in Adult Education and graduate-level certificates in Pharmacy, among others.  The UGA offers "e-Learning" programs in various departments with Web-based classroom materials and an online learning management system.

Colleges and Schools

The University of Georgia has 16 schools and colleges offering many degree programs, including some interdisciplinary options.

Schools and Colleges at UGA:

  • Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Business
  • Ecology
  • Education
  • Environment and Design
  • Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Forestry and Natural Resources
  • Graduate School
  • Journalism and Mass Communication
  • Law
  • Pharmacy
  • Public Health
  • Public and International Affairs
  • Social Work
  • Veterinary Medicine

Student Life

UGA requires its first-year students to live on campus through their first academic year to get the complete university experience.  There are many residence halls to choose from among several campus communities: Brumby Community, Creswell Community, East Campus Village, Hill Community, Myers Community, Reed Community and Russell Community.

There are many programs available to UGA students that encourage involvement and participation on campus.  The Office of Multicultural Services and Programs celebrates its diverse population and people of color by promoting student leadership and academic achievement.

UGA has many facilities for student health and recreation, including recreational sports and the GORP program, which offers special excursions in hiking, climbing, riding, rafting sailing, and more, for students of all levels.

The Office of Student Affairs has information about the many student groups, clubs, societies and organizations that students can participate in.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are 59 national fraternities and sororities at UGA, and "Greek Life" has been a strong tradition at the university for more than 150 years. The Greek groups at UGA organize and coordinate many annual events and provide leadership for many educational and community programs.

Traditions

The University of Georgia has a long history of traditions, many of which have been made famous in books and movies.  The school's athletics teams have been named the "Bulldogs" since the school was founded and many news reports about sports games at the UGA have made the Bulldogs high profile.  The UGA mascot bulldog, named "Uga," appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine, and in the movie "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil."

Another tradition at the UGA is the ringing of the chapel bell on campus after a Bulldog football team victory.

There is an Arch located on the Northern section of the University of Georgia campus that freshman were traditionally forbidden to walk under.  Although this tradition is no longer enforced, some freshmen still honor the tradition.

Athletics

The University of Georgia's intercollegiate athletics programs ranks among the top 10 in the U.S.  Its Bulldogs teams have won national championships for the past several years in many sports including women's gymnastics, men's tennis, women's swimming and diving, tennis, equestrian and golf.  The women's basketball team is referred to as "The Georgia Lady Bulldogs."

Intercollegiate Sports at UGA:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Equestrian
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The University of Georgia's main campus is in Athens, Georgia, and offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees through its 16 schools and colleges.  The UGA also offers many undergraduate and graduate degrees, and continuing education programs through its satellite campuses elsewhere in Georgia:

  • UGA Gwinnett Campus
  • UGA Griffin Campus
  • UGA Tifton Campus
  • UGA Terry College of Business

Community Life

Community outreach and service is a large part of the University of Georgia's mission.  The UGA has a long history of service to Georgia, and has many public service programs that allow students to work in communities throughout the state on economic development, K-12 education, leadership, professional education and training, as well as research for state agencies.

The community of Georgia, Athens provides ample opportunities for students to find entertainment and explore. There are many art galleries and music and theatre performances on and off campus. The attractive downtown area of Athens offers numerous shops, restaurants, cafes and taverns, helping to make this one of the "Best College Towns" in the United States.

Acceptance Rate

45.3

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

George Washington University (GW) is located in the heart of Washington, D.C., a short distance from the White House. Students and faculty of GW have the opportunity to work on projects alongside leaders of politics, science, law and many other disciplines. Students also have the opportunity to intern on Capitol Hill, or attend national events and listen to world leaders speak. The commencement ceremonies for graduates are held on the National Mall.

The three major campuses of GW University are the Foggy Bottom Campus and Mount Vernon Campus in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Virginia. All the campuses offer excellent facilities, including a library system that houses more than two million volumes, and opportunities to attend professional sports events, headline entertainment, top art exhibits, and more. Off campus and distance learning is also available through online courses.

The GW alumni are internationally recognized, and include former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Arnold "Red" Auerbach, former coach of the Boston Celtics, actors Alec Baldwin and Kerry Washington, and more than 50 Fulbright scholars, among others.

GW University offers hundreds of options for academic majors and minors at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Students can choose their major and minor from among the following academic interest areas:

  • Business & Management
  • Engineering & Technology
  • Health, Medicine & Nursing
  • History & Government
  • International Studies
  • Literature & Language
  • Media, Journalism & Communication
  • Professional Studies
  • Religion & Philosophy
  • Science & Mathematics
  • Security and Public Safety
  • Social & Human Behavior
  • Visual & Performing Arts

History

The George Washington University was founded in 1821 as "Columbian College" through an Act of Congress. It was established in response to George Washington's vision of an institution in the nation's capital that would educate and prepare its future leaders. Washington died before his vision was realized, but President James Monroe and others were committed to carrying out the venture. The university opened with three faculty members and 30 students enrolled.

Now the largest university in the District of Columbia, GW is comprised of three campuses: Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. GW also has several graduate education centers in the D.C. area.

Academics

The academic calendar for the George Washington University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and multiple shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Law School
  • School of Engineering & Applied Science
  • Graduate School of Education & Human Development
  • School of Business
  • Elliott School of International Affairs
  • School of Public Health & Health Services
  • College of Professional Studies
  • School of Nursing

Student Life

There are more than 300 student clubs, groups and organizations for GW University students to get involved in. Student engagement at GW is high, and when students aren't participating in some of the many community service or leadership events or hands-on learning labs or partnerships available through local organizations, there is plenty to do to engage students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds. GW offers a world-class library, state-of-the-art facilities, and a full range of sports, arts and entertainment.

The Washington, D.C., region offers many cultural and outdoor activities as well. The campuses are all well situated in interesting neighborhoods, with easy access to all the metro area has to offer.

Traditions

There are many rich traditions at the GW University, many of them tied to the school's namesake, President George Washington.

The school colors are Blue and Buff (pale gold), and the GW fight song makes reference to these colors:

Hail to the Buff,
Hail to the Blue,
Hail to the Buff and Blue!
All our lives we'll be proud to say,
We hail from GW! (Go Big Blue!)
Oh, by George, we're happy we can say,
We're GW, here to show the way, so
Raise high the Buff!
Raise high the Blue!
Loyal to GW
You bet we're
Loyal to GW!
Fight!

Athletics

The George Washington University "Colonials" athletic teams compete in 22 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

The GW University has three major campuses: the Foggy Bottom Campus in the "Foggy Bottom neighborhood in the heart of Washington, D.C.; the Mount Vernon Campus in the wooded "Foxhall" neighborhood on the former site of Mount Vernon College; and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia - an area known for its focus on technology research.  Each campus has a distinct ambiance with integrated services and amenities.

In addition to its three major campuses, GW has education facilities throughout the region of Washington, D.C., that serve as centers for graduate professional studies programs.

Community Life

Students at all three main GW campuses enjoy great neighborhoods. The Foggy Bottom Campus is located in 18 city blocks of the "Foggy Bottom" neighborhood, known for its low-rise brick and brownstone buildings and streets lined with trees.

Students on the Mount Vernon Campus will enjoy a quieter setting on 23 acres within a wooded residential area.

Students at GW are very likely to be involved in community activities and service, contributing to hundreds of organizations from non-profits to politics. Students in the GW athletics department are active volunteers of community organizations, including motivational presentations to local high school groups, clean-up activities at local parks and facilities, assisting local youth sports, and more.

Acceptance Rate

40.84

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Syracuse University (SU) is a public research university located in Syracuse, New York. SU offer high-ranking degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels in a comprehensive range of subject areas. Known for its excellent study abroad programs, nearly 40 percent of SU students study in other countries through Syracuse University. Students can customize their Study Abroad experience, and have choices of programs in the Middle East and Florence, Italy, among other locations.

SU is committed to providing "Scholarship in Action," which is part of its mission of a "University as Public Good." The region around Syracuse has a rich tradition of social scholarship, and played a strong role in abolitionism and the women's rights movement. The SU mission includes fulfillment of the following objectives:

  • To educate fully informed and committed citizens
  • To provide access to opportunity
  • To strengthen democratic institutions
  • To create innovation that matters, and we share knowledge generously
  • To inform and engage public opinion and debate
  • To cultivate and sustain public intellectuals 

Syracuse University has an excellent faculty and has produced many illustrious alumni who have made their mark in a wide range of fields. Some noteworthy SU Alumni are Stephen Crane (author of The Red Badge of Courage), Dick Clark (host of American Bandstand), Jim Brown (football star, actor, and social activist), Frank Langella (award-winning stage and film actor), Joyce Carol Oates (award-winning novelist), Ted Koppel (award-winning broadcast journalist), Betsey Johnson (fashion designer known for whimsical designs), Lou Reed (rock singer-songwriter for The Velvet Underground), Joseph Biden (vice president of the United States), Bob Costas (host of NBC's "Football Night in America"), and Eileen Collins (first woman astronaut to command a NASA space mission), among many others.

History

Syracuse University was founded in 1870 as a private institution of higher education offering programs in physical sciences and modern languages.

Academics

The academic calendar for Syracuse University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. The summer semester is divided into a short "Maymester," Session I, Combined Session and Session II.

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Architecture
  • The College of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Education
  • L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science
  • Graduate School
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • School of Information Studies
  • College of Law
  • The Martin J. Whitman School of Management
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts
  • University College
  • Summer at Syracuse 

The academic and research centers at Syracuse University include:

  • Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture
  • Burton Blatt Institute
  • Center for Health and Behavior
  • Center for Natural Language Processing
  • Center for Policy Research
  • Falcone Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism
  • Institute for the Study of the Judiciary, Politics and the Media
  • Daniel P. Moynihan Global Affairs Institute
  • Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering (CASE)
  • NYS Science and Technology Law Center
  • Syracuse Biomaterials Institute
  • Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems
  • Sustainable Community Solutions
  • Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC)

Student Life

There are more than 300 registered student groups and organizations at Syracuse University, including an active Greek Life on campus, intramural sports and plenty of student events and activities. Student services include fitness facilities, on campus housing and dining, student health services, veteran and military services, advising, counseling, a resource center, and more.

Traditions

The traditional school colors for Syracuse University are orange and white, with royal blue as an accent color. The school mascot is "Otto the Orange," who makes more than 100 appearances every year at SU games or public events. The athletic teams are nicknamed the Syracuse "Orange."

Athletics

The Syracuse "Orange" athletic teams compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

Syracuse University's main campus is located in Syracuse, New York. In addition to its main campus, Syracuse has many Study Abroad programs around the world, including Florence, Italy, and satellite locations or programs in:

  • Washington, D.C.
  • Manhattan (NY, NY)
  • SU West Coast (Semester in LA)
  • SU Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Community Life

Syracuse University is located at the top of a hill overlooking the City of Syracuse. Downtown Syracuse and Armory Center are a short walk, drive, or bus ride from campus. Syracuse is a vibrant city offering cultural, recreational, and artistic events.

As a Syracuse student, you can enjoy the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, the nationally known Everson Museum of Art, the Rosamond Gifford Zoo, sports events, the Carousel Center mall, and festivals like "JazzFest" and "Winterfest."

Acceptance Rate

44.38

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

American University is a nonprofit private institution located in Washington, District Of Columbia and provides a large number of degree programs for students. The United Methodist affiliation of this school is an important part of the history, education and curriculum that defines the school. Enrollment at AU exceeds 13,000 per year.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Social Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Education

Students applying for admission are most often asked to submit an application, school records, test scores and any requested letters of recommendations, which will then be reviewed by the admissions staff. Most common test scores among applicants admitted to AU are between 26 - 30 on the ACT, or 1750 - 2050 for the SAT exam. 42% of those students that apply are accepted to American University, of which 20% choose to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at american.edu.

The cost of tuition is close to $42,000 for the year. Tuition prices may change for any number of reasons, and as such students should use the school's price of attendance calculator to understand their personalized cost estimate of attendance. The cost of on-campus housing is estimated to be $10,000 for the year. Students at this school may be eligible for aid which is generally scholarships, grants, and loans.

Athletic programs are available at American University through the NCAA, allowing students to participate in intercollegiate athletics. Sports available may include:

  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Lacrosse (NCAA Division I-AAA)

To see a full list of academic programs offered, enrollment information, admissions information, and more, please visit the school's website at http://www.american.edu.

Acceptance Rate

36.08

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

Known as the largest college in the northwestern region of the United States, the University of Washington is comprised of three campuses, the largest being UW in Seattle. It was founded in 1861 and now belongs among the top universities in the world. UW is also recognized as a premier public research university, receiving one of the biggest amounts of federal funding for university research throughout the country. Over 4,000 faculty members oversee 18 schools and colleges, offering more than 250 graduate and undergraduate programs.

Contributing to the university's prominence is the UW School of Medicine, acknowledged to be the best in primary care education and medical research in the country. Faculty members are comprised by physicians from Harborview Medical Center, Seattle Children's Hospital, and numerous UW Neighborhood Clinics in the Seattle area. Since 1946, UW Medicine has constantly ranked among the country's top biomedical research facilities and has grown to accommodate a total of 30 academic departments and several graduate programs in biomedical sciences.

Students at UW are entitled to many university services for healthcare, counseling, on and off campus housing, a U-PASS commuter services program, and a childcare program for student-parents. UW is also famous for its commitment to environmental stewardship, switching to the use of renewable sources of electricity within campus grounds. Several student organizations are at the helm of promoting sustainable living and advocating environmental causes such as UW Farm which oversees the local production of food and promoting organic farming inside the UW community.

Establishments within the UW campus include several galleries and exhibits such as the Burke Museum which stands as the state museum of natural history, the Henry Art Gallery featuring contemporary art, the Meany Hall for the Performing Arts, and the UW Botanic Gardens. The athletic complex, on the other hand, includes the Dempsey Indoor Track, Nordstrom Tennis Center, King County Aquatics Center, Bank of America Arena, and the Husky stadiums for football, baseball, and soccer.

Acceptance Rate

51.76

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

North Carolina State University at Raleigh (NC State) is ranked in the top 50 U.S. public universities, and number three in the U.S. among public universities that receive funding for research.  Research is a foundation of the academic culture at NC State, and 70 percent of the university's faculty conduct research. Many graduate students are supported by research funding.

NC State has its primary campuses located in Raleigh, North Carolina, which is considered one of the best places to live and work in the U.S.  The university's campuses - Main Campus (comprised of South, Central, North, West and East campuses) and Centennial Campus - are located in a region that boasts some of the country's top technology, research and pharmaceutical companies.

Known as "the People's University," NC State is the largest university in North Carolina, with more than 8,000 faculty and staff.  Since many of its classes are large, the university has a policy of providing smaller discussion groups and labs so students get more learning opportunities.  NC State has established the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, which provides research-based information to statewide communities.

History

Established in 1887 and opened in 1889, North Carolina State University began as the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.  In the 1900s, the school established the Cooperative Agricultural Extension Service at State College, which led to many more extension programs, research and outreach work and, eventually, to an official name change.  The curricula expanded greatly over the years, moving far beyond agriculture and mechanic arts to offer all major academic disciplines and to receive top ranking in a number of disciplines.

Academics

NC State has 12 colleges and schools offering all major academic disciplines. Through its history, NC State has been a leading university in agriculture, forestry, wood and paper science, engineering, textiles, veterinary medicine and design. It is also strong in all the sciences, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and computer science.  NC State also has strong departments in the humanities and social sciences and mathematics, among others.

NC State's state-of-the-art research programs are among its highlights, offering students the opportunity to work on campus and off with leading researchers in many fields. NC State has made many important research discoveries, with roughly 660 patents to its credit. Some of NC State's "firsts" include the prototype for the artificial retina, and the first synthetic aorta.

Colleges and Schools

The 12 colleges and schools of NC State University are:

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • College of Design
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Poole College of Management
  • College of Natural Resources
  • College of Physical Mathematical Sciences
  • College of Textiles
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • First Year College
  • Graduate School

Athletics

The NC State University's athletics teams are known as the "Wolfpacks" or "Packs" for short. North Carolina State University teams have won two NCAA national championships and two AIAVV titles, among others.  NC State competes in 23 intercollegiate sports.

The school also offers 45 different club sports to NC State students, including 18 intramural leagues for all skill levels.

Student Life

Known as the "People's College," NC State has more than 400 organizations and activities for students to get involved in.  The myriad categories include:

  • Arts & cultural activities
  • Academic organizations & honorary societies
  • Service groups
  • Graduate student associations
  • Peer group, lifestyle & diversity initiatives
  • Political & social action groups
  • Professional & career support
  • Religious & spiritual organizations
  • Special interest opportunities
  • Sports, recreation & leisure activities
  • Student governing boards
  • Student media & publications

There are also many leadership opportunities through NC State's service-learning programs and community service initiatives that integrate community work with academics.

Year-round arts and entertainment programs and activities are also available for students and faculty.  There are arts organizations and exhibits, on-campus cinema, media outlets, theatres, crafts centers, dance performances, music performances and the summer TheatreFest.

The Division of Student Affairs at NC State offers support and services to students through many extracurricular recreational activities.

There are many choices for on-campus housing at NC State including residence halls at East, West and Central campuses.  There are also the "Living and Learning Villages," which are residence halls devoted to grouping students with similar lifestyle or academic interests.  The Wolf Village Apartments, Western Manor and E.S. King Village are conveniently located off-campus apartment complexes for married students.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are many fraternities and sororities open to students on the NC State campus.  There are local chapters of national organizations as well as many "social" groups who are involved in a variety of leadership, service, academic and social activities.

The school has issued a warning that the Zeta Psi fraternity has been suspended from the university for being found responsible for hazing and alcohol violations, among other infractions.

Traditions

Holladay Hall, which was built in 1889, was the first campus building for NC State and is still considered its "main building."

The "Free Expression Tunnel," a tunnel that connects two halves of NC State's Central Campus, was established in the 1960's as a place where students could express themselves through wall graffiti.

NC State's school colors are red and white, although the original school colors were pink and blue.

The school mascot became the "Wolfpack" in 1922 after its students were described as behaving like a "wolf pack" at sporting events.

An NC State student wrote the words to the school's fight song in 1926:

NCSU Fight Song
Shout aloud to the men who will play the game to win
We're behind you, keep fighting for State---
Hold that line, hold 'em fast,
We'll reach victory at last
We're behind you, keep fighting for State---
Rise up to the fray and let your colors wave,
Shout out for dear old N.C. State --GO STATE!
And where-e'er we go,
we'll let the whole world know,
We're behind you, keep fighting for State.

Community Life

NC State is a land-grant institution and, as such, it encourages and promotes community involvement in every department through extension programs, engagement initiatives, economic development efforts and many partnerships with outside organizations.

Acceptance Rate

45.13

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

The University of Illinois at Urbana is the largest and oldest campus in the University of Illinois system and is a public research facility.

History

The University of Illinois at Urbana was established in 1867, after a bidding war between several Illinois cities. It was originally called the Illinois Industrial University and was founded under the 1862 Morrill Act. Students were first welcomed to the school on March 2, 1868. At that time there were only two faculty members. In 1885, the name of the school was changed to the University of Illinois. In 1982, the name was once again changed. It is now known as The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne.

Academics

The University of Illinois at Urbana has over 100 graduate and professional programs and more than 150 undergraduate programs. Their academic programs are ranked as some of the best in the world. The University is one of the United States' premier public universities.

Major academics include:

  • College of Applied Health Sciences
  • College of Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Sciences
  • College of Education
  • College of Business
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Fine and Applied Arts
  • Graduate College
  • Division of General Sciences
  • College of Law
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • School of Labor and Employment Relations
  • College of Media
  • Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences
  • College of Medicine at Urbana-Champagne
  • School of Social Work
  • College of Veterinary Medicine

Other academic units include:

  • UIC College of Nursing Regional Program at Urbana
  • UI Online
  • Continuing Education
  • International Programs and Studies

It is also listed as one of the Top 25 American Research Universities by The Center for Measuring University Performance

Student Life

All first year undergraduates who do not commute must live in University housing and are required to purchase a meal plan. Graduate housing includes two graduate dormitories and two university owned apartment complexes. Students who are disabled are provided with accommodations to meet their needs.

The University of Illinois at Urbana has a large Greek community that includes thirty-six sororities and sixty-nine fraternities. The Greek system is self-governed by the Inter-Fraternity Council and Pan-Hellenic Council.

The University has modern recreational facilities. The campus has over a thousand clubs and organizations, including athletic, cultural and philanthropic.

Athletics

The University of Illinois at Urbana participates in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division one. The University's athletic teams are known as the Fighting Illini. There are eleven women's and ten men's varsity sports. The University is a member of the Big Ten Conference.

Community

Be sure to stop by the Alma Mater bronze statue that is located on campus. It is a tranquil area where the flower bed stretches from the statue to the corner of Green and Wright Streets. This area is known as Alma Mater Plaza.

The botanical garden and 2,000 square foot conservatory, known as the University of Illinois Conservatory and Plant Collection, is located in the Plant Sciences Laboratory Greenhouses on campus. If you have an interest in plants or horticulture, this is a must-see, as is the University of Illinois Arboretum. It includes 160 acres on the south campus and includes a Welcome Garden, Japanese House and Hartley Garden, among others.

There are many other things to see and do in the area that are reasonably priced. Take in the seasonal festivals, go to an art fair, join the weaver's guild, take a dance class, join a bridge club or take a pottery or martial arts class.

Acceptance Rate

59.03

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

Top Degrees in Biotechnology

The rapidly growing field of biotechnology is a burgeoning field in science with ever-expanding applicability in the marketplace.  As such, degree programs at accredited colleges & universities continue to proliferate while evolving in scope.  The programs range from undergraduate certificates through graduate degrees.

In addition, many schools now offer online degrees in biotechnology effectively doubling the number of programs students can select.  To help you ascertain the best program for you, simply request information from the best college for you below as you work towards a decision for your future.

Certificate Programs in Biotechnology

Undergraduate certificate programs in biotech provide students with the basics in a condensed format.  Unlike degree programs, a certificate program is typically shorter in term and hyper-focused on a singular field of study.

The net result of a certificate is for students to gain foundational knowledge in the field to prepare them for a degree-granting program or for an entry-level position.  Community colleges and junior colleges offer a substantive selection of certificate programs along with research universities as the biotech field rapidly evolves.

Associate Degree in Biotechnology

Associate’s degrees in biotechnology are conferred in one of three ways:

  1. Associate of Science (AS)
  2. Associate of Arts (AA)
  3. Associate of Applied Science (AAS)

Either degree pathway will typically take students two-years to complete, if enrolled on a full-time basis.  The time it takes for part-time students to earn an AA degree will depend.  Pace, course load, and program requirements will ultimately determine how long it will take a student to earn an associate's degree on a part-time basis.

Associate degrees mix liberal arts education with rich-latent classes to provide students with a well-rounded education.  Liberal arts classes you can expect to see in a course catalog include communications, psychology, history, art, philosophy, and creative writing.  Core classes in biotech will cover many of the same principles from school to school.  Examples of core curriculum include the following classes: biology, chemistry, statistics, organic chemistry, calculus, geometry, physics, and physics with calculus.

Bachelor Degree in Biotechnology

Online bachelor’s degrees in biotechnology are conferred as Bachelor of Science (BS) or a Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS).  Bachelor degrees are designed to be completed in 4-years.  Degree programs at this level blend general education courses with core science and math-based curriculum.

Core classes may include a combination of bioscience, molecular biology, cell biology, bioethics, managing and leading, regulatory affairs in science, law, international regulation, marketing, finance, product commercialization, and emerging issues in biotech.

Master Degree in Biotechnology

An online degree earned in biotech is a 2-3 year program for full-time students.  Degrees can be conferred as a Master of Science (MS) or Master of Applied Science (MAS).  Most colleges and universities allow students to select an area of emphasis in a graduate degree track which directly affects the classes taken in the program.  Students may have an interest in research, regulation, health sciences, virology, marine biotechnology, agriculture, neuroscience, oncology, biostatistics, biofuels, biosensors, stem cell biology, or food toxicology.

Most master degree programs end with the successful completion of a capstone course and thesis project.  With the ever-expanding field of biotech, students may find new niches to pursue in the near-term along with top-tier science professors.   Graduate students in biotech will be equipped to make an impact in a growing field of study in research organizations, colleges, or industry upon program completion.

Educational Requirements in Biotech

In terms of educational requirements, Biotechnology degree holders will have typically studied the following courses while in college:

Employment Outlook & Biotech Jobs

Prospective scientists looking for biotech jobs will find various pathways with a college degree. Jobs in biotech can be for traditional organizations or niche research organizations in disparate sectors.

Biotech jobs and areas of specializations can include any number of the following pathways: food scientist, high school teacher, agricultural engineer, post-secondary teacher, research specialist, genomics, animal scientist, immunologist, biophysicist, toxicologist, biomedical engineer, virologist, pharmacologist, epidemiologist, biologist, microbiologist, plant scientist, medical scientist, and nutritional scientist.

Biotech Careers

Career paths in biotechnology are projected to grow much faster than the average employment.  More specifically, the BLS estimates job growth for biomedical engineers to surge 23% and biochemists will see an 11% bump in employment during that timeframe.  All told, the employment opportunities should exceed 5,000 new jobs in the coming ten years.

Mean annual income for biotech jobs is also well above average.  As an example, the mean annual compensation for a bioengineer $92,970 with the top 10% earning nearly $145,000 a year on average.  Similarly, the median annual income for a biochemist $91,190 a year with the top ten percent earning approximately one hundred eighty-thousand dollars a year.

Additional Resources in Biotechnology

Additional resources in biotech can be found by connecting with well-respected associations such as BIO and ICBA.  Both acclaimed organizations provide membership benefits, cutting-edge research, and career opportunities in fields of study such as healthcare, agriculture, environmental, and industrial sectors of the economy.

Featured Rankings

Find Your College Match

Sort By
PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com