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Building Inspector and Home Inspector is a field of study in business focused on the assessment, analysis, and communication of a building structure’s compliance and safety.  Both a Building Inspector and Home Inspector assess a building or home and render a professional judgement on the degree to which it adheres to applicable building code requirements.

A Building Inspector is often employed by a municipality, township, or county entity and frequently certified with an area of specialty.  The possible specialties of a Building Inspector include residential, commercial, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, rough-in, and final inspection to name a few.

Meanwhile, a home inspector is an independent, private contractor hired by a home owner, developer, or community association to ensure compliance with CCR’s, building codes, plumbing, mechanical, electrical, and specialty codes for a given municipality or planned community.

The Building Inspector and Home Inspector degree track prepares students to prudently manage, inspect, and supervise a wide range of projects from small construction projects, high rise buildings, and a variety of associated projects.

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$58,480

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

36.63%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

101,200

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Building Inspector and Home Inspector Courses

Aside from being among the oldest members of the California State University system, SDSU is also the first and largest college in San Diego, California. It is now a highly-regarded research university, having come a long way from starting as an institute for teacher training under the name San Diego Normal College in 1897. There are currently almost 200 fields of study being taken up by students throughout all undergraduate and graduate levels in all of its seven colleges, namely: Arts and Letters, Sciences, Engineering, Professional Studies and Fine Arts, Health and Human Services, Business Administration, and Education.

Enrollees at both the main and the Imperial Valley campuses are entitled to apply for opportunities to be part in any of over 300 educational programs in more than 50 countries all over the world. Possessing at least $1 billion worth of study grants, SDSU students are directed by its Division of Research Affairs in pursuing research activities in numerous fields such as public health, transportation safety, and computational science.

Recreation and athletics also play a great part of college life at SDSU. The San Diego State Aztecs have teams representing the school in basketball, baseball, football, soccer, among others. Celebrations on campus grounds are highlighted by Homecoming Week during the fall term. Spring term is marked by Green Fest, another week-long event that promotes environmental sustainability.

San Diego State maintains a huge role in emphasizing the importance of higher education among younger students in the surrounding communities. As a partner in the Compact for Success program, it assists the Sweetwater Union High School District in implementing courses that will prepare qualified students for admission to the university after graduation.

Acceptance Rate

34.13

Student to Faculty Ratio

27:1

The University of Alaska Southeast, located in Juneau, Alaska, with additional campuses in Ketchikan and Sitka, provides students with a comprehensive education while studying near the scenic and last temperate rain forest in North America, the Tongass National Forest. UAS provides a strong liberal arts education for Alaska residents and beyond.

Academics

The University of Alaska Southeast provides certificate programs, and degree programs starting from the associate level all the way to the master's. The program length depends on the degree pursued, with higher level degrees typically taking longer to complete.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid

Students wishing to enroll at AUS must either be a high school graduate with a 2.0 GPA, successfully completed the GED, or have taken 30 college level credits prior to applying. Admissions into the bachelor's program requires student to have a certain GPA and SAT/ACT score combination in order to be considered, where the higher the SAT?ACT score the lower the GPA may be (but not below 2.0). Master's programs have varying requirements, but all require the applicant to have a bachelor's degree.

Students seeking financial aid must submit a tax transcript that may be included as part of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial aid applications must be submitted by the posted deadlines on the financial aid page on the school's website.

Acceptance Rate

60.57

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

North Bennet Street School is a two-year career college that offers a rewarding education for its students. Over 350 students have attended and received a degree in the last few years based on published graduation information with more than 87% of students who start the program complete it. North Bennet Street School offers several programs to choose from. The more popular enrolled programs are listed below:

  • Musical Instrument Fabrication and Repair
  • Furniture Design and Manufacturing
  • Carpentry
  • Locksmithing and Safe Repair
  • Precision Production

To support students and graduates, North Bennet Street School may offer support services like:

  • Student employment
  • Employment search assistance

North Bennet Street School has been accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges since 1982. Please visit nbss.edu for more information on programs offered and consumer disclosures.

Acceptance Rate

-

Tuition

$50,150 / year

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

Diablo Valley College (DVC) is a two-year college in the Contra Costa Community College District. It is located on a 100-acre campus in view of Mt. Diablo, and just 20 miles from the University of Berkeley, California. Many students at DVC aim to transfer to UC Berkeley and other four-year institutions to complete their bachelor's degrees. DVC has an excellent transfer rate, and transfer agreements with the UC California and California State College systems.

DVC offers associate's degrees and vocational and professional training that leads to certificates of achievement and accomplishment. DVC offers academic study programs in 57 occupational specialties. Lifelong learning opportunities are also available without a degree or certificate, and many courses are available online through "DVC Online."

History

Established in 1949 as East Contra Costa Junior College, it originally operated out of rooms in local high schools, banks and churches. It got its own campus site in 1952, and the name was changed to Diablo Valley College in 1958.

Academics

The academic calendar for Diablo Valley College offers fall, spring and summer terms, with shorter sessions available at other times throughout the year.

Colleges and Schools

Academic units at DVC are organized into academic divisions. The nine academic divisions at Diablo Valley College are:

  • Applied and Fine Arts
  • Biological and Health Sciences
  • Business Education
  • Counseling/Library
  • English
  • Math and Computer Science
  • Physical Education, Athletics and Dance
  • Physical Sciences and Engineering
  • Social Sciences
  • At San Ramon campus, the divisions are:
  • Applied Arts & Social Science
  • Language Arts
  • Math & Science
  • Computer Information Systems (CIS)

Student Life

For students at Diablo Valley College who are seeking involvement beyond the classroom, there are a wide variety of student clubs and organizations available on campus. The focus of the 50-plus student organizations on campus ranges from academic to athletic, social, political, cultural, religious, artistic and special interest. Students who wish to start their own student club or organization may do so through the Associated Students of Diablo Valley College (ASDVC).

Art galleries featuring student art, musical, theatre and dance performances are also available. The student newspaper offers information about campus activities and offers more opportunities for student involvement.

Other student resources available through DVC include student health services, a student life office, student union, leadership, support resources, and a calendar of events, among others.

Traditions

DVC has a relatively new fight song called "Go Green," which is quickly becoming a new student tradition. The traditional school colors are green and white, with gold as an accent color. The school mascot is a Viking, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the Diablo Valley "Vikings."

Athletics

The Diablo Valley College "Vikings" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Water Polo

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its primary Pleasant Hill Campus in Pleasant Hill, California, Diablo Valley College also has the San Ramon Valley Center in the Dougherty Valley area of San Ramon, California. Classes are also taught at various locations throughout the community.

Community Life

Community resources for Diablo Valley College include an observatory that features a planetarium, and community access to theatre, dance and musical performances on campus.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

Irvine Valley College has many outstanding programs to choose from. IVC offers more than 60 associate degrees as well as over 50 certificate programs. Student enrollment exceeds 15,000 students with students from over 50 different countries. Tuition for California residents is $46 per credit. Not only is Irvine Valley College affordable, but it offers an education that propels students to success. Many students have gone on to earn advanced degrees in medicine and law. The college has developed agreements with four-year institutes which include transfer programs. These programs allow students to transfer to California State University campuses.  An outstanding honors program provides high achieving individuals a challenge. Students who finish the honor program are given top priority when applying to UCLA and other top universities. The school emphasizes STEM students. Irvine Valley College provides chances for students to work together to achieve more.  In addition, Irvine Valley College works with veterans to help them transition to an academic program. Over 3,000 veterans are currently enrolled. IVC has been designed a Military Friendly School for 2013. The college offers many outstanding services that assist students. There is a counseling center that provides students the help they need. Child care is also available for parents who want to attend Irvine Valley College. Student clubs and organizations help enhance ones college experience. On campus clubs include Art Club, ASEC, BEES, Biological Society, Business Leaders Society, Cheer Club, Chinese Club, Finance Club, Forensics, Geography Club, Math Club, Pre-med club, and Green Team Alliance.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

31:1

About
Savannah Technical College, located in Savannah, Georgia, was founded in 1929 through the sponsorship of the city council. At the time institution was known as the Opportunity School, which quickly outgrew its facilities and requiring expansion. Over the next few decades the school added programs and moved to large facilities allowing a larger number of students to participate in the school's offerings. In 1959 the school combined with other recently established schools to form the Savannah Area Vocational-Technical School, which served the counties of Chatham, Bryan, Effingham, Long and Liberty. The school again went through a long period of expansion, adding new facilities and campuses. By 1997 the school became part of State Board of Technical and Adult Education and in 2000 changed its name to Savannah Technical College. The school currently operates five campuses and offers a quality technical education that evolves with the needs of the local economy. Programs are added based on need and updated as necessary to remain current and relevant.

Academics
Savannah Technical College provides a large number of programs that may result in a diploma, certificate or degree. Technical and career focused programs offer students an education that assists in the development of the skills and abilities necessary to perform the tasks and duties native to their field of study. These programs allow students to enter the workforce upon completion and vary in length based on the type of program entered. Academic programs allow for the completion of the first two years of a four year education at low cost and transfer to a four year college or university to obtain a bachelor's degree upon completion. Other resources are also available, such as specific courses for interest, continuing education classes and online courses for those students in need of flexible schedules.

Programs offered include:

Savannah Technical College guaranteed the education provided to its students. If an employer finds that a student is deficient in a given area, he or she may contact the school allowing for the student to return and retrain for that particular deficiency for no additional cost. The guarantee has a two year window starting at graduation.

Admissions and Financial Aid
Students interested in enrollment at Savannah Technical College must complete the application and pay the application fee, submit all relevant documents, including transcripts and test scores, as well as take a placement exam to determine what level of general education courses the student must enroll in. Students applying for in state tuition must supply proof of residency.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans and grants. Students in need of financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to determine need, eligibility and awards. Scholarships may also be available, often requiring a separate application and awarded for reasons as outlined by the goal of the scholarships.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Saddleback College is a two-year community college located in South Orange County, California. It offers lifelong learning, academic transfer programs, associate degree and certificate programs and career training. There are more than 300 academic programs at the associate degree level, and more than 190 occupational skills programs that prepare students to join the workforce.

Academic study areas include everything from accounting, acting and musical theatre, to economics and education, and nursing or nutrition to oceanography or psychology.

Saddleback College also offers online learning and study abroad programs. Its successful transfer program for students transferring to the University of California or California State University systems ranks high. Universities and colleges that Saddleback students transfer to include UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, UC San Diego, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and San Diego State University, among others.

Saddleback College offers a comprehensive selection of arts programs, where students can choose from degrees in music, photography, art, cinema-television-radio, speech and theatre. There is an on-campus television station, radio station, and 400-seat theatre (McKinney Theatre) - all offering state-of-the-art facilities.

History

Saddleback College was founded in 1968 in Mission Viejo, California.

Academics

The academic calendar for Saddleback College follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

As a two-year community college, the academic units for Saddleback College are divided into departments and divisions, rather than into colleges and schools.

Student Life

Students at Saddleback College can choose from more than 50 student clubs and organizations, or enjoy some of the many sports events, cultural activities or campus arts and entertainment.

Student services include advising, counseling, career planning, job placement services, on-campus childcare, a health center, re-entry services, veterans educational services, and more.

Traditions

Saddleback College is the "home of the Gauchos"(college mascot). The official school colors are cardinal red and gold, with white as an accent color.

Athletics

The Saddleback College "Gauchos" athletic teams have won three national championships, 24 state championships, and many regional and conference titles. The "Gauchos" compete in 20 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Water Polo
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

Online courses and programs are available through Saddleback College, but there is only one campus location, and it is in Mission Viejo, California.

Community Life

Saddleback College offers a Community Education program with classes that complement the academic curriculum. These are short-term, non-credit classes. Community Education classes are geared for both children and adults in response to a community need. Classes for the community include dance, music, sports, arts, reading and writing, among others.

The Saddleback College Emeritus Institute is a community program that offers courses in subjects geared towards older adults, or senior citizens. These courses are offered at community centers throughout Orange County.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

College of the Canyons is a two-year community college offering associate's degrees in more than 60 programs, and professional certificates in more than 65 programs. Academic programs range from television, film and video production to video game animation, or biotechnology to child development studies, from paralegal studies to industrial manufacturing or theatre arts.

College of the Canyons has recently received funds to improve existing programs and expand into new areas. It will soon add more classrooms, labs and facilities at its new Canyon Country campus. It will also upgrade its technology at the existing Valencia Campus in Santa Clarita, California, and expand instruction in public safety and a variety of other high-demand professions.

History

The College of the Canyon was created in 1967, and it officially opened in temporary quarters in the local high school in 1969. In 1970, the college purchases 153 acres in Santa Clarita along the Interstate 5. Since that time, College of the Canyons has expanded from a small community college holding its classes in modular buildings, to one of the nation's fastest-growing community colleges. The college is currently undergoing the highest rate of construction on its campus since its first buildings were erected in the early 1970s.

Academics

The academic calendar for College of the Canyons follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. There is a winter "intersession" between the fall and spring semesters. There are several short sessions offered within the 10-week summer semester.

Colleges and Schools

The academic units at College of the Canyons are divided into academic departments, rather than into colleges and schools. The academic departments are comprehensive, covering traditional disciplines and high-demand career areas such as fire technology, nursing or administration of justice.

Student Life

College of the Canyons has many student clubs and organizations available for participation on campus. Students that don't find a club that covers their interests among the nearly 100 existing clubs or organizations may establish their own club.

Student services at College of the Canyons include:

  • Admissions, Records, and Online Services
  • Adult Reentry
  • Assessment Center
  • Associated Student Government
  • Campus Safety
  • Career Center
  • Continuing Education
  • Cooperative Work Experience Education
  • Counseling
  • Disabled Students Program and Services
  • Extended Opportunities Program and Services
  • Financial Aid
  • International Students Program
  • Matriculation
  • Service Learning Program
  • Student Business Office / Cashier
  • Student Development
  • Student Health Center
  • Transfer Center
  • Veterans Affairs

Traditions

The traditional school colors for College of the Canyons are yellow, black and white. The school mascot is the cougar, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the Canyons "Cougars."

Athletics

In addition to the option of studying sports medicine and strength and conditioning, the College of the Canyon "Cougars" athletes compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross County
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main Valencia Campus in Santa Clarita, College of the Canyons has a satellite Canyon Country campus, also in Santa Clarita.

Community Life

College of the Canyons offers many non-credit classes for the community. Current offerings include a series of classes on the issues of aging, a Federal and State Tax class, classes for English learners, and traffic school online.

College of the Canyons offers a variety of resources to the community, including many events that serve locals. The college staff participates in workshops, forums and information sessions that provide valuable assistance. Community members are encouraged to visit the College of the Canyons events calendar for a list of events and resources.

Single Mothers Outreach through College of the Canyons empowers single parents and their children by providing support and resources to help families become self-sustaining.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

Pasadena City College is a two-year community college located in Pasadena, California, adjacent to the city of Los Angeles. PCC offers a range of academic study programs for the associate's degree or as a transfer program to a four-year college to complete a bachelor's degree.  Academic study areas include everything from French, to Business or Urban Studies. Distance Learning, workforce training and continuing education are also available.

Among Pasadena City College's illustrious alumni are best-selling adventure novelist Clive Cussler, fashion designer Bob Mackie, actor Nick Nolte, singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins, philanthropist Herbert Hoover III, baseball legend Jackie Robinson, and rock star Eddie Van Halen, among others.

History

Pasadena City College was founded in 1924 as Pasadena Junior College. By 1939, the Pasadena City College Bulldog band had become the official band of the Tournament of the Roses Parade - now the Rose Bowl Parade. During World War II, PCC's West Campus was used for specialized military training. In 1943, the U.S. Army assumed control of the site.

The Post-War Boom led to unprecedented growth in Pasadena. The G.I. Bill allowed many veterans to buy homes and continue their education in the area. PCC had to expand to accommodate their increased student body, so it re-opened its abandoned West Campus as John Muir College.

In the 1950s, the school expanded further and also changed its mascot from a bulldog to a lancer (a Medieval Knight on foot or on horseback, holding a lance). In the 1960s and 1970s, PCC experienced the turbulence of the era, and many student protests were held on campus.

The 1980s brought a demand for social and ethnic studies, and PCC expanded its curriculum to include these programs. In the 1990s, diversity among students and faculty increased and the curriculum expanded again to incorporate emerging technologies and multimedia.  The campus facilities were extended during this period as well, bringing PCC up to date for the new millennium.

Academics 

The academic calendar of Pasadena City College follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and shorter winter and summer "intersessions."

Colleges and Schools

As a two-year college, PCC divides its academic units into instructional divisions, rather than into colleges and schools.  The instructional divisions of PCC include:

  • Business and Computer Technology
  • Engineering and Technology
  • English
  • Health Sciences
  • Kinesiology, Health & Athletics
  • Languages
  • Library
  • Mathematics
  • Natural Sciences
  • Performing and Communication Arts
    • Dance, Music, Speech, Theater Arts, TV and Radio
  • Social Sciences
  • Visual Arts and Media Studies
  • Community Education Center

Student Life

Students at PCC have a history of being very involved in campus activities, and that is greatly encouraged.  There are many involvement and leadership opportunities at PCC, including student government, a cross cultural center and planning board, cultural awareness and leadership retreats, countless clubs and organizations representing a range of interests, and many more events and activities to participate in.  The PCC Student Affairs Office hosts a range of student services and events.

Traditions

The school mascot is a Lancer - a medieval knight who carries a lance.

Athletics

PCC "Lancer" athletic teams offer cheerleading and compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Track 

Women's Sports:

  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Track
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

PCC offers many programs that connect the school to the Pasadena community through support and services. There are programs that offer high school students off-campus credit courses, a community business center on the PCC campus that offers child ID services and, passport applications and fingerprinting, and a community education center that offers non-credit, no-fee classes, including English as a Second Language, Parent Education, and more. Extended learning programs offer enrichment classes to community members.

Pasadena, the home of the Rose Bowl Tournament and Parade, is a diverse city with a small-town feel. The temperate climate and proximity to the city of Los Angeles and all its cultural and entertainment venues, as well as the wonderful California beaches and mountains, make the area popular with students and visitors alike.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

About Gwinnett Technical College is located in Lawrenceville, Georgia.  It was originally founded in 1984 as the Gwinnett Area Technical School.  Since its founding the school has been dedicated to providing an education in high demand fields that result in employment upon graduation.

The school changed its name to Gwinnett Technical Institute to better align itself with the state's technical institute system. During the next decade the school would add several degree programs and receive accreditation, finally meeting the standards required to be identified as a college in 2000 and changing its name to the current.

GTC had invested in its own development, utilizing funds to introduce new facilities and renovate previously existing ones in order to create new programs of study that meet the needs of the modern student.

Academics As a technical institute, GTI offers programs of study that allow students to develop the skills and abilities necessary to enter the workforce as a professional. The programs offered offer an extensive course of study that provide theoretical, classroom and practical courses, preparing individuals with the experience through simulated real world environments.

Programs are offered in a variety of fields, allowing individuals to choose the one that best reflects his or her goals and interests. Programs take between one and two years to complete and result in a certificate or diploma that demonstrates competency and allows for entry level employment upon completion.


The school also offers continuing education courses for established professionals seeking to update their knowledge base  or renew certification or licensure. Courses are taken individually and can offer flexible scheduling.

GTC also provides adult education courses that prepare individuals for the GED, allowing one to complete his or her high school education and earn an equivalency diploma.
Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid Gwinnett Technical Institute is a public, two year, open enrollment institution. Any individual wishing to enroll may do so through the completion and submission of the application for admission and payment of tuition.

Students should also supply standardized test scores (if available) and previous educational transcripts. Students may be required to take a placement exam. Students are also encouraged to participate in orientation and to meet with a counselor to help choose programs and develop a curriculum.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans and grants. Students in need of financial assistance must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and submit it either online or through the mail. The information provided on the FAFSA will be used by the school to develop an aid package based on the student's needs and aid program eligibility.

Financial aid must be reapplied for prior to the start of each academic year. Due to recent changes in financial aid regulations, students may be chosen at random to provide additional financial information to be compared to the FAFSA in order to ensure its accuracy.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

21:1

Santa Rosa Junior College (SRJC) has two primary campuses in Sonoma County - one in Santa Rosa, and the other in Petaluma - just 52 miles north of San Francisco. SRJC is one of 108 community colleges in California. The Santa Rosa Campus is situated on a beautiful 100 acres with towering oak trees and turn-of-the-century brick buildings, offering modern classroom facilities. The Santa Rosa campus boasts a planetarium, art gallery, the Jesse Peter Native American Museum and a Summer Repertory Theatre. The Petaluma campus is situated on 40 acres and includes a Technology Academy. SRJC also has a regional Public Safety Training Center in Windsor, a 365-acre self-supporting farm near Forestville, a Culinary Arts Center in downtown Santa Rosa.

SRJC grants associate of arts (A.A.) and associate of science (A.S.) degrees. It also offers a study program for students planning to transfer to four-year colleges and universities, and more than 170 career skills certificate programs. SRJC has a basic skills program prepares students for college level courses. SRJC offers a Study Abroad Program, an award winning athletic and forensics teams, popular performing and visual arts programs, and an active student government.

The SRJC Robert Shone Farm is a self-sustaining farm in the Russian River area that generates income from the sale of products from of SRJC's vineyard, oat, sheep and swine operations. Students majoring in agriculture and forestry have many opportunities for hands-on education at the farm.

History

Founded in 1918, Santa Rosa Junior College is the tenth oldest publicly funded two-year educational institution in California. It initially had 19 students enrolled, and is now one of the largest college districts in the U.S.

In the 1960s, the college began recruiting minority students and offering ethnic studies. The college now has a very diverse faculty, staff and student body.  The SRJC Foundation was established in 1969, and now awards more than 600 scholarships each year.

Academics

The academic calendar of Santa Rosa Junior College follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a summer term.

Colleges and Schools

As a two-year junior college, SRJC's academic units are not divided into colleges, but rather into academic instructional departments, certificate programs, associate's degree programs, and programs for transfer preparation, job training and workforce development, and study abroad.

Student Life

The many student clubs and organizations on SRJC's campuses offer students a range of topic focuses from AG Ambassadors who guide students in service projects in agriculture to American Sign Language (ASL) clubs, and California Politics to Vocational Nursing.

Student Services at SRJC include assessment services, adult re-entry assistance, CalWORKS, Career Development Services, a tutorial center, veteran affairs, and assistance finding off-campus housing, among others.

Athletics

The SRJC "Bear Cubs" athletic teams compete in many intercollegiate sports in the junior college division, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Water Polo
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main, Santa Rosa Campus, Santa Rosa Junior College has several satellite campuses and learning centers, including:

  • Petaluma Campus
  • SRJC Technology Academy (Petaluma, CA)
  • SRJC Public Safety Training Center (Windsor, CA)
  • SRJC Culinary Arts Center (Santa Rosa, CA)
  • SRJC Shone Farm (Forestville, CA)

Community Life

The many events, venues and performances on the SRJC campuses are open to the general community. SRJC is considered a cultural hub of the Santa Rosa community, and its holiday chorale and other musical performances are popular with the locals, as are performances by the Summer Repertory Theatre, the Arts & Lecture series, and Planetarium shows.

SRJC offers community classes for personal interest and professional development, as well as cooking classes at the SRJC's Culinary Arts Cafe and Bakery.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

History

The institution was founded in Athens, Georgia (as Akers Computerized Learning Centers) on April 12, 1982, approximately two years after development of the educational courseware had begun. The demand and popularity led to the opening of three additional sites in Atlanta in 1983, with a fourth being added in 1985. An initial Texas Campus was opened in Dallas in 1986.

On December 30, 1986, the organization was acquired by Interactive Learning Systems. Under new ownership, campuses were added in Houston, Texas and Florence, Kentucky.

In 1988, the Board of Directors was expanded and the institution received initial accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and School, Commission on Occupational Education. The initial six-year grant has been followed by three subsequent grants through 2012. In 1995, the Main Campus was approved to offer the Associate Degree in Office Technology, Computer Programming, and Electronics Repair Technology. These programs allow diploma-completing students to receive full transfer credit into the degree programs.

In 1996, the Main Campus was moved to Chamblee, Georgia, across from the MARTA station, and the name was changed to Interactive College of Technology. This campus, consisting of over 60,000 square feet of classroom and laboratory space, includes "Roberts Hall", dedicated to Board Chairman, Richard D. Roberts. The campus includes laboratory and classroom facilities serving over 1,200 students from all over the world. The campus is easily located by its "court of flags", featuring the flags of most of the countries represented in the student body.

Interactive College of Technology also has branch campuses in Gainesville and Morrow, Georgia. These campuses offer the complete ESL program and one-year diplomas in Business & Office Technology.

Accreditation

The institution is accredited by the Council on Occupational Education (COE), which is the successor to COEI of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS):

Council on Occupational Education

7840 Roswell Road, Bldg. 300, Suite 325

Atlanta, GA 30350

(800) 917-2081

The above council is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and by the Council on Regional Post?Secondary Accreditation (CORPA).

COE is also a member of the Commission on International and Transregional Accreditation Alliance (CITA). This alliance, composed of most of the regional accrediting agencies, offers a system of accreditation to over 30,000 public and private institutions in over one hundred countries. By virtue of the institution being accredited by COE, the institution also holds accreditation in the CITA.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

23:1

Butte College works to offer quality education at affordable prices. The college aims to prepare students for life-long learning by mastering the essential skills that will allow one to earn degrees and certificates and achieve the career of one's dreams. Butte College is located in Oroville, California. In-state tuition is only $46 per unit.

Butte College is located just over an hour from Sacramento. The college strives to be a leader in sustainability efforts.

Studying at Butte College is affordable and a great way to complete your first two years of college before transferring to a university. Butte College students have a strong track record when it comes to succeeding at a four year university. The College's transfer programs offer coursework that meet the general education requirements for the California State University system. When transferring, students will be well prepared for a rigorous academic program.

The college also has English as a Second Language program. Classes are offered in various locations. A vocational English as a Second Language program takes place at Community Employment Centers in Chico and Oroville in the morning.

Online courses are helping make a college education accessible to everyone. Every year Butte College increases the number of courses it offers online. Online courses are perfect for individuals with a full-time job or kids. Child care is also available for students who need it.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

21:1

Bellingham Technical College, located in Bellingham, Washington, is a fully accredited community college that offers 35 associate degrees and 43 career certificate programs.

Each year, BTC has over 8,000 students enrolled at their campus, which lies 90 miles north of Seattle. BTC offers partnerships with larger state Universities to ensure acceptance and the transferal of credits for students who wish to pursue a 4-year degree.

Bellingham Technical College’s job placement program has been incredibly successful and is a great way for alumni to find jobs after graduation. 84% of graduates are placed in a degree applicable job within 6 months of their graduation date.

While Bellingham Technical College does not offer an athletic program, there are other student activities that are extended to attendees. BTC offers a fully-functional student government, many campus-based groups and clubs, as well as the opportunity to join Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society dedicated to two-year institutions.

The cost to attend Bellingham Technical College is $105.00 per credit hour for Washington State residents. For out-of-state students, the cost to attend BTC is $277.00 per credit hour.

Applying at Bellingham Technical College is easy. Applications can be completed online or in-person at the BTC campus. Class enrollment forms are provided online and in-person for the convenience of the student.

If you would like to apply to attend Bellingham Technical College, or of you would like to learn more about the programs of study offered at BTC, click here to access their official website.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Utah Valley University (UVU), located in Orem, Utah, is an institution of higher education that emphasizes hands-on learning that it refers to as "engaged learning," and earned the school the status of a "community engaged" school. In fact, UVU has an "Engaged Learning Office" and receives grants to support its many engaged learning projects, which includes internships and community service.

UVU offers 57 bachelor's degree programs and three master's degree programs.  Additionally, UVU offers many career and technical training programs both on campus and through its partnership with Mountainland Applied Technology College.

History

In 1941, UVU was founded as Central Utah Vocational School to provide war production training. It was part of the Provo School District in Utah. In 1947, the school received funds to become a permanent state school, and in 1948 it received a permanent campus site in Provo. Once the school grew, the state acquired more land for a larger campus in Orem, Utah. The first building at this new site was erected in 1977.  After several name changes through the years, the school is now called the Utah Valley University (UVU). It has 46 buildings on its main Orem Campus, with additional sites in Provo, Heber City and Lehi, Utah. The school's mission remains to serve the communities in the southern Utah region, including Utah, Wasatch and Summit counties.

Academics

Utah Valley University's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and a summer term that is comprised of three shorter sessions.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Humanities & Social Sciences
  • College of Science and Health
  • College of Technology and Computing
  • School of Public Services
  • School of the Arts
  • School of Education
  • University College
  • Woodbury School of Business

In addition to its Colleges and Schools, UVU has several academic centers and Institutes.

Student Life

There is much to do at UVU, and many opportunities for student involvement.  UVU has many student clubs and organizations that focus on academics, sports, religion, special interests and more. For students who are interested in the arts, there are exhibits, showings and performances available at the Woodbury Art Museum, Noorda Theatre, Regan Theatre, and UCCU Center for sports events. In addition to intramural sports teams, there is the Outdoor Adventure Center, which organizes outdoor excursions that include river rafting, skiing, and rock climbing.

Additional services and facilities for students include a multicultural center, Service Learning Center, Center for the Advancement of Leadership, Honors Program, Student Ambassadors program, and more.  

Athletics

The "Wolverines" athletic teams of UVU compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Track & Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main campus in Orem, Utah, UVU has the following campuses and sites:

  • Wasatch Campus (Heber City, Utah)
  • Provo Airport Campus (Provo Municipal Airport)
  • Canyon Park Building (Orem, Utah)
  • Capitol Reef Field Station (Capitol Reef National Park, Utah)
  • UVU North (Westlake High School, Saratoga Springs, Utah)
  • UVU North (Lehi Jr. High School, Orem, Utah)
  • UVU West (Orem, Utah)
  • UVU South (Spanish Fork High School, Orem, Utah)
  • Mountainland Applied Technology College

Community Life

Orem, Utah is located 45 minutes south of Salt Lake City.  It is nestled in the Wasatch Mountains near Utah Lake. Students and community members have access to outdoor adventures year round, such as water or snow skiing, hiking, and rock climbing.  There are numerous parks in Orem, and the many outdoor concerts and other community activities contribute to making it a great place to raise a family. Orem also boasts a vibrant grass roots art and music scene, in addition to its excellent shopping venues.  The Orem area is also a hub for business, with many major companies and start-ups located in the region.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

22:1

Fullerton College (FC) is a two-year community college located near Los Angeles, in Fullerton, California. Fullerton offers associates degrees in more than 90 programs, and vocational certificates in nearly 150 programs. Fullerton offers excellent academic transfer programs for students wishing to transfer to four-year institutions to complete their bachelor's degree. Fullerton is ranked third in California for its number of student transfers into a California State University.

Fullerton College is part of the North Orange County Community College District. The mission of Fullerton College is to: create a community that promotes inquiry and intellectual curiosity, personal growth and a life-long appreciation for the power of learning.

The student resources offered at Fullerton College include a top-notch Library/Learning Resource Center, a College Center with dining options and a student lounge, wireless internet access, a Wellness Center, Service Learning, a weekly campus newspaper, free tutoring services, and more.

The Fine Arts at Fullerton College are thriving, with more than 20 musical performance groups, as well as a playwrights festival, directors festival, jazz festival, choir festival, and piano ensemble, among others.

History

Fullerton College was founded in 1913 as "Fullerton Junior College." It changed its name to "Fullerton College" in 1972.

Academics

The academic calendar for Fullerton College follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

Academic units or divisions at Fullerton College are divided into departments. There is a comprehensive range of departments at Fullerton College, offering a wide range of academic study programs.

Student Life

College activities at Fullerton include homecoming, the Festival of Diversity, the Fullerton College Marketplace, and many cultural events and field trips. There are more than 50 student clubs and organizations at Fullerton, ranging from interests in culture, academics, recreation, faith and politics. Whether students wish to join the Math Club, the Hiking and Adventure Club, or the Persian Club, they'll find much to choose from at Fullerton College.

The Cadena Cultural Center on campus offers student resources and services that include:

  • Cadena Cultural Center Seminars
  • Campus Cultural Events Photograph Gallery
  • Fine Arts Calendar (art, music and theater)
  • Intern & Volunteer Opportunities
  • Study Abroad Program 

Support Resources Related to:

  • FC Dream Team
  • African American/Black
  • Asian/Pacific Islander
  • Disability Support
  • Euro-American/White
  • First Generation College Students
  • Foster Youth
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender
  • Latino/Hispanic
  • Native American
  • Spiritual Support
  • Veterans
  • Women

Traditions

The school colors for Fullerton College (FC) are blue and white. The school mascot is a hornet, and the FC athletic teams are nicknamed the Fullerton College "Hornets."

Athletics

The Fullerton College athletic program is part of the Orange Empire Conference, and Fullerton "Hornets" athletic teams participate in 14 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

Fullerton College is located on a campus of roughly 80 acres in the city of Fullerton, California, in Orange County. Fullerton is about 30 miles south of Los Angeles, and near the Pacific coastline. Student on campus will have easy access to many world-famous attractions, theme parks like Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, museums and areas of interest.

Fullerton College's campus is walking distance from downtown Fullerton, where there is a wide selection of restaurants, cafes, and shopping spots. There is a nearby Metrorail station, and many city buses that regularly stop in front of Fullerton College.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

Palomar College is a two-year community college that is part of the Palomar Community College District located in North San Diego County, California. The main campus of Palomar College is located in San Marcos. The main San Marcos Campus, which is situated on 252 hilly acres, is the location of The Palomar College Arboretum. Students and community members enjoy the Arboretum as a place to study botany and relax.

Palomar College offers numerous academic degree programs at the associate's degree level. It also offers the Associate in Arts for Transfer (AAT), for those students planning to transfer to a four-year university to complete a bachelor's degree. Palomar also offers certificates of achievement and proficiency in several areas, as well as non-credit courses.

In addition to its academic degree and certificate programs, college transfer programs and workforce training and professional development, Palomar College offers a Community Development program. Community members may continue learning and developing their interests and skills through workshops, "Venture" classes, seminars, activities and events at Palomar.  Palomar College also offers distance learning through online courses.

Academics

The academic calendar for Palomar College follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and three shorter summer sessions.

Colleges and Schools

Palomar College is not divided into colleges and schools, but has more than 100 academic programs and course offerings.

Student Life

Palomar College offers many student services and amenities including the student bookstore, admissions services, financial aid, career services, counseling services, children's center, disability resource center, intramural athletics, veterans' services, health services, student affairs, and a student activities office (SAO) that provides information about student clubs and organizations on campus. In addition to these many services, Palomar College is home to several excellent recreational and entertainment venues, including the Boehm Gallery, the Planetarium, and the Arboretum, among others.

There are food services on all of the Palomar College campuses, but no on campus housing is available. 

Athletics

The Palomar College "Comets" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main San Marcos Campus in San Marcos, Palomar College has several satellite campuses or "Educational Centers" in the San Marcos, CA area of North San Diego County:

  • Palomar College at Camp Pendleton Educational Center (Camp Pendleton, CA)
  • Palomar College Escondido Center (Escondido, CA)
  • Palomar College at Fallbrook (Fallbrook, CA)
  • Palomar College at Mt. Carmel (San Diego, CA)
  • Palomar College at Pauma (Pauma Valley, CA)
  • Palomar College at Ramona (Ramona, CA)

Community Life

In addition to offering a Community Education program and many sites and events that are open to the community, Palomar College forges business and service partnerships with organizations and groups in the North San Diego County community.

The geographical area of North San Diego County is known for its beautiful coastline and inland areas, and many of its communities are quite affluent. There are foothills and ridges separating the beaches from the nearby mountains, creeks and lagoons.  Communities in the area include La Jolla, Rancho Bernardo, Solana Beach, Cardiff-by-the-Sea, Del Mar, and Rancho Santa Fe, among others.

In addition to lovely beaches, there are numerous golf courses in the area, and the San Diego Zoo and Wild Animal Park are within easy reach.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

College of the Sequoias offers many opportunities for people who live in Tulare and Kings Counties in California. The college was founded in 1925 and moved in 1940. The main campus is located in Visalia and the school operates a full-service center in Hanford. The college has an agriculture program on a 16-acre farm. However it is currently constructing another in Tulare. Tuition for Californian residents is $46 per unit.

The college offers many unbelievable supporting services that place student learning as the top priority. During your time at the College of the Sequoias, you can earn a degree or a vocational certificate, or complete your requirements for a four-year college or university degree or upgrade specific skills. Student services offered include health care, counseling, child care, and veteran’s services.

These programs aim to meet the needs of students so that they finish their studies successfully. The college provides services to people with disabilities and first year students.

College of Sequoias offers more than one hundred and fifty eight certificates and degrees in Academic and Career & Technical Education programs. Some of the programs offered are: veterinarian assistance program, accounting, administrative assistant, paralegal, real estate, art, vocal music, communication studies, biology, chemistry, and physics.

The school is home to 17 athletic teams that participate in the Central Valley Conference in all but three of our sports. The football team is a member of the Northern California Football Association and the women’s tennis team is a member of the Big 8.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

Edmonds Community College, located in Lynnwood, Washington, is a two-year institution that offers 75 different associate degrees, over 50 professional certificates, and more than 30 programs of study. With broad curriculum and opportunities, Edmonds Community College is a great place for freshmen to prepare for four-year universities.

In addition to the vast educational opportunities, Edmonds Community College offers an unparalleled athletics program. Offering Baseball, Basketball for men and women, soccer for men and women, softball, and volley ball, ECC has a sports team for everyone. The ECC weight room and locker rooms are open for use by all athletes, free of charge. ECC even offers scholarships to prospective athletes through all of their sports teams.

The cost to attend Edmonds Community College for students who reside in Washington State is $107.00 per credit hour. The cost for out-of-state residents is $279.00 per credit hour. ECC offers reduced-rate tuition to military veterans, members of the national guard, and their dependents of $80.00 per credit hour.

ECC also offers an extensive child care program that gives reduced rates and priority to students of the college who may need to utilize this service. Licensed by the Department of Early Learning, children will be cared for in a pre-school style atmosphere. If the parent of attending children receives federal financial aid, the child care center will accept it as a form of payment for child care services.

If you are interested in applying to Edmonds Community College or would like to learn more about their offered programs, click here to access their official website.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

About
College of the Desert, located in Palm Desert, California, was founded in 1958, opening for enrollment in 1962. The school is one of 110 colleges that comprise the California Community College System. Since the school's founding donations by benefactors have facilitated the school's growth, allowing for the addition of new facilities and the expansion of program offerings to better serve residents within the school's growth area. Additionally, the increase growth of the regions has seen an increase in overall enrollment, which is currently nearly 10,000 students annually. COD is dedicated to providing a quality education and college experience for students, providing services and facilities as well as programs that are reviewed to remain current and relevant for modern students.

Academics
College of the Desert provides an extensive number of programs for students to choose from, allowing them the opportunity to take the career or academic transfer program that interests them most. Career programs develop the skills and abilities necessary to enter the workforce as a professional, usually in fields reflective of community's needs and in high demand. Programs usually take between one and two years to complete, resulting in a certificate or associate degree that demonstrates competency in the area of study. Graduates can seek employment after graduation having gained the experience and knowledge required for entry level work through practical and classroom courses.

Programs for transfer complete the first two years of a four year education at low cost, followed by transfer to a four year institution to complete a bachelor's degree. Transfer to public California institutions is facilitated through agreements allowing for admission if transfer guidelines are met. Students may  choose to pursue transfer to out of state or private institutions, each with their own transfer admissions requirements. As such, it is recommended students meet with a counselor to develop a curriculum that meets the requirements of the student's desired school or schools.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
College of the Desert is a two year open enrollment institution, and as such allows any individuals that meets the minimum requirements for enrollment to submit an application and be admitted. Students must provide transcripts and complete the placement exam, submit financial aid applications, and participate in orientation prior to registration of classes. Students should also meet with an academic advisor to prepare a plan for their education. Registration takes place prior to the start of each semester with tuition fees due shortly thereafter.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants and scholarships. Aid is awarded based on need and is determined by the information submitted through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students in need of assistance will have their FAFSA reviewed by the financial aid office which will determine how much and which aid the student will receive. Students may be asked to provide additional information prior to the disbursement of funds to ensure the FAFSA's accuracy. Financial aid must be must be applied for prior to the start of each academic year.

Athletics
The College of the Desert Roadrunners participate in intercollegiate athletics through the California Community College Athletics Association (CCCAA), which allows for an environment of healthy competition among California's many community colleges. Participating students will be able to develop skills and abilities such as good health, discipline, sportsmanship and teamwork, that may be useful in one's personal, academic and professional life. Students will also be able to experience the camaraderie that comes with the successes and failures of pursuing a goal alongside teammates. Athletic will have different schedules, interested students should contact the athletic department to obtain tryout dates, times, schedules, and forms.

COD Athletic programs:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

28:1

San Diego Mesa College is the largest of three two-year community colleges in the San Diego Community College District in Southern California. The other two community colleges in the district are San Diego City College and San Diego Miramar College. The district also includes six Continuing Education campuses that offer non-credit classes in life skills and enrichment.  The Continuing Education Educational Cultural Complex (ECC) at Mesa offers classes that lead to associate degrees and certificates.

Like its two counterparts, San Diego Mesa College offers associate degree and certificates in occupational programs. Mesa students who wish to transfer to four-year universities to complete a bachelor's degree, can choose from many academic transfer programs in the arts and sciences. Because of its excellent faculty and diverse programs, Mesa College has one of the highest transfer rates in the state.

Mesa College, which opened in 1998, has a beautiful campus with state-of-the-art science labs, an athletics complex and athletic fields, a theatre, fine arts facilities and a Learning Resource Center.

Mesa College is a smoke-free campus, and is committed to preventing the health risks associated with exposure to second-hand smoke. Students and visitors who choose to smoke must do so beyond the campus perimeter. Mesa College is also a Green Campus, with many programs that support eco-awareness and sustainability. Some past events include the Eco-Awareness Series of lectures and events, the EnviroClub Student Recycling program, an Organic Gardening program, Tecolote Canyon Day, and more.

History

San Diego City College was founded in 1914 as San Diego Junior College. It was the first community college in San Diego, and the third community college established in the State of California. San Diego Mesa College opened in 1998, as part of the San Diego Community College District.

Academics

The academic calendar for San Diego Mesa College follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters.

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Arts and Languages
  • School of Business, Computer Studies and Technologies
  • School of Health Sciences / Public Service
  • School of Humanities
  • School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
  • School of P.E./Health Education and Athletics
  • School of Social/Behavioral Sciences and Multicultural Studies

Student Life

There are numerous student clubs and organizations on the Mesa College campus available for student involvement. Student clubs include performance groups, an honors program, service learning, and several groups that focus on academic, cultural or political interests.

Student services at Mesa College include the Learning Resource Center, which provides audiovisual services, a Center for Independent Living, a library and the High Tech Center. Additional services include a career center, counseling, disability support programs, a foster youth program, health services, testing, orientation, tutor centers, a transfer center, veteran student services, and more.

There are also special programs such as Study Abroad, and the Freshman Year Experience.

Traditions

The San Diego Mesa College school colors are blue, gold and white. The school mascot is the "Olympians."

Athletics

The San Diego Mesa College "Olympians" athletics teams compete in 20 men and women's intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Badminton
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

San Diego Mesa College has one campus. However, there are two other community colleges in the San Diego Community College District: San Diego City College, and San Diego Miramar College. There are also several sites throughout the San Diego metro area that provide classes through the Continuing Education program within the district.

Community Life

The San Diego Community College District reaches out to business and industry in a variety of ways. The Corporate Council is an advisory opportunity, allowing local business people to provide input into the education process that the district follows to train San Diego's workforce. The Partnerships Program creates strong ties with the region's significant military community, and its technology, transportation, hospitality and business sectors.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

Riverside Community College (RCC) is often referred to as Riverside Community College District.  RCC is now comprised of three colleges: Riverside City College, Moreno Valley College and Norco College.  Distance education is also available through the district's Open Campus program.

Riverside City College is home to Riverside School for the Arts (RSA), a curriculum project of the college with programs that enhance and expand on existing degrees and certificates offered at the college. RSA programs lead to achievement in the arts with emphasis on the practical skills needed to be financially successful in the arts and new media.  RSA has strong ties to the entertainment and multimedia industries found in the Southern California area, and these ties enrich the practical aspects of the program and offer potential employment opportunities.

Located in downtown Riverside, Riverside City College offers its students a wide range of choices from more than 100 associate's degree programs, to preparation for transfer to four-year colleges, or career certificates.  The college has strong programs in liberal arts, performing arts, science, nursing and athletics.

District Mission Statement

Riverside Community College District is dedicated to the success of our students and to the development of the communities we serve. To advance this mission, our colleges and learning centers provide educational and student services to meet the needs and expectations of their unique communities of learners. To support this mission, District Offices provide our colleges with central services and leadership in the areas of advocacy, resource development and planning.

History

Riverside City College was founded in 1916 on the site of the former Poly High School.  It has since grown to be one of California's leading community colleges.

Academics

Riverside Community College District has four academic terms: fall term, winter term, spring term and summer term.

Colleges and Schools

Riverside Community College District has three colleges: Riverside City College, Moreno Valley College and Norco College.  Distance education with online classes is also available through the district's Open Campus program.  Riverside City College is home to Riverside School for the Arts (RSA).

Student Life

The visual arts at each of the RCCD colleges enrich students' lives through access to great faculty, facilities and classes in painting, drawing, design, computer and animation.  Other exciting activities on campuses include dance classes open to students and recreational dancers.  The Moreno Valley College Gospel Singers have toured locally and internationally.  The men's and women's cross country teams for RCCD practice at MVC.  The Career and Transfer Centers at each of the three colleges provide academic services to students.  There are also Counseling Centers, Health Services, an Honors Program, Study Abroad Program and many other student resources.

Athletics

Riverside Community College Athletic Training prepares student-athletes for the many competitive Tigers teams in men and women's sports that include:

Baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, swim/dive, track & field, tennis, water polo, women's basketball, cheerleading, women's cross country, fast pitch and volleyball.

Satellite Campuses

Riverside City College, Riverside, CA

Moreno Valley College, Moreno Valley, CA

Norco College, Norco, CA

Community Life

The Associated Students program at each RCCD campus provides a program of activities. A calendar of events is maintained in each school's library. Students are encouraged to stop by or visit the website (www.rcc.edu/asrcc/index.cfm) to see how they can get involved.

The Associated Students also sponsors many clubs and organizations.  There are honors societies, social services, and professional and general interest clubs. Membership to these groups is open to all paid members of the Associated Students.  Club guides are available in the Student Activities or Government offices.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

27:1

About
McHenry County College, located in Crystal Lake, Illinois, is a public two year institution founded in 1967 as part of the Illinois Community College System. The school supports and serves community college district 528, which covers most of McHenry County and parts of outlying areas. The school serves nearly 8000 part time and full time students a year. The school believes in providing high quality education at a low cost, and assisting students in meeting their goals both academically and professionally. McHenry County College is accredited by multiple accrediting bodies both regionally and nationally.

Academics
McHenry County College offers a large number of programs to provide a diverse selection for students interested in attending. These programs result in either an associate degree or certificate based on the type of program studies. Some programs provide career or technical training, resulting in the development of skills and experience necessary to perform tasks and duties required by the field. Graduates of these programs are eligible for entry into the workforce immediately after graduation. Students in academic transfer programs complete the first two years of a four year education prior to transfer to a four year institution. Once transferred the student will be considered a sophomore and approximately two years away from completion of bachelor's degree.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
Students interested in enrollment at McHenry County College must either be a high school graduate, have a GED, or be 16 years of age and withdrawn from high school. As an open enrollment institution, all applicants are eligible for enrollment if they meet the above criterion and submit all pertinent information prior to the admissions deadline prior to the start of a given semester.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, and work study programs. Scholarships are also available to individuals demonstrating academic excellence or qualify for external scholarships which have separate criterions for awarding funds. Students in need of aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and obtain a PIN number in order to determine need and eligibility and receive awards.

Clubs and Organizations
McHenry County College has a number of clubs and organizations that may be of interest to students. Students may join these clubs, that have active meeting schedules and participate in a variety of event, in order to meet like minded individuals or to contribute to their development. Clubs are good method for meeting others and discussing ideas, often developing bonds that last long after they have graduated and moved on. A full listing is available online and through the campus, as well as other student organization resources and an events calendar.

Clubs and organizations at McHenry County College include:

  • Art Club
  • Down to Earth
  • Equality
  • Pagan Fellowship
  • Game Developers Club

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

CMN, a nonprofit private institution, offers a large number of program options, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Keshena, WI, the campus offers a rural setting for students to study in. As a tribal college, the school's primary goal is to serve residents of the reservation and to provide postsecondary educational options for its students. The school's small size in terms of enrollment, approximately 600 students, offers students a more hands on education due to class size and easier access to faculty.

Students can select from many areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Liberal Arts And Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Education

The school maintains an open enrollment policy, accepting all applicants that meet the basic requirements for admission. Submission of transcripts, records, test scores, and letters of recommendations may be needed for certain programs. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

Tuition is approximately $6,500 annually, though it may change based on different types of circumstances. Students should visit the school's price of attendance calculator to determine a more personalized cost estimate. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the necessary requirements.

To see a full list of areas of study, programs, enrollment information, admissions information, and more, please take a look at the school's website at http://www.menominee.edu.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

Cabrillo College, located in Aptos, California, was established in 1959 as Cabrillo Junior College and began operations with a freshman class of 400 students. The school is named after Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, the Portuguese explorer who was first to map the coast of California. Cabrillo College strives to meet all the needs of the community and is known as a college that cares about people. Cabrillo College is continually evolving, adding programs and renovating facilities as needed to meet can predict community needs and expectations. The school currently enrolls over 17,000 students, and continues to grow.

Academics

Cabrillo College offers over 70 programs of study to meet the needs of its large student body. The school offers transfer programs, designed to meet requirements necessary for transfer to a four year institution. Additionally, the school also provides technical and vocational training for more career oriented students looking to enter the job market as trained professionals as soon as possible. The programs offered will result in a diploma, certificate or associate degree depending on which program was taken. The school also offers adult education, continuing education, and community classes for individuals wishing to increase their skill base or return to school.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid

As a community college, Cabrillo College has an open enrollment policy allowing students to apply online or in person in order to obtain admittance. New students will be required to take a placement exam and attend student orientation prior to registering for classes. It is also important for students to meet with academic counselors to outline and determine which classes need to be taken in order to meet the needs of an academic program.

Financial aid is available in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and employment. Eligibility is determined through the student aid report obtained as a result of completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students should adhere to the listed deadlines for both admissions applications and financial aid, in order to avoid the possibility of missing out on aid awards for a semester or year.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

21:1

What Does a Building Inspector Do?

A building inspector is trained to thoroughly evaluate and examine the structural integrity, quality, and overall safety of buildings. Inspectors ensure buildings adhere to local, state, and international building codes while complying with applicable zoning and ordinances.

Building inspectors may be called upon to help assess large and small-scale buildings along with new construction reviews and existing buildings. New building projects may require inspectors to review site plans and blueprints to verify it meets requisite building codes and ordinances.

Existing buildings would necessitate inspectors to address code issues, perform an inspection prior to a sale, or assess an urgent building situation. Building inspectors can work independently or with a larger organization, typically on a full-time basis. They will work in the field and in an office providing diversity to the job week over week.

What Does a Home Inspector Do?

A home inspector is a certified, trained professional that assesses a homes overall condition and functionality. Home inspectors investigates a homes mechanical and electrical systems, plumbing, structural integrity, living spaces, exterior envelope, signs of pest intrusion, and overall aging of a home.

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) helps to establish a set of uniform standards to be used as a valid baseline for home inspectors. Home inspectors are hired by homeowners, real estate agents, real estate attorneys, and home buyers to assess a home.

A summation of the inspection is put into a standard report and provided to interested parties albeit the homeowner, bank, lender, real estate broker, closing agent, underwriter, and/or buyer. Deviations from standards can be addressed by interested parties as part of a sale or used as terms of negotiations by either party.

How to Become a Building Inspector or Home Inspector

Step 1: Earn a College Degree

To maximize your opportunities for success in the field as an inspector, earning a college degree is your best bet. Inspectors typically need a high school diploma or equivalent, however many employers favor candidates with a degree and work experience in the field.

When selecting a degree or certificate program in home inspection or building inspection, seek program that offer a comprehensive curriculum. Students learning the basics of home construction, building systems, architectural design, building codes, local ordinances, construction technology, and drafting will have an advantage over basic programs.

Step 2: Work Experience

Students with work experience in the field of inspecting are more likely to successfully transition into the workforce after graduation. Gain work experience before college and during college, if possible.

Apply to help inspectors with commercial and residential jobs, electricians, plumbers, HVAC specialists, general contractors, or volunteer if work is not available. The repetition and exposure to variations in inspecting will help meld academic work with pragmatic skills needed to succeed in the field.

Step 3: Training

Building inspector and home inspector training programs will vary by local municipality and state. If your college or university is outside your home area, make sure to register for local training.

It is critical to your success to know the basics of buildings and home systems along with local codes, ordinances, and standards to accurately complete inspection reports. Training will likely include time management, organization, legal contracts, zoning, ordinances, documentation, and techniques to efficiently complete a variety of inspections.

Step 4: Licensing & Certification

Depending on your state of residence, you may be required to sit for a state-specific license and/or certification. Your state will establish a set of educational standards, training requirements, work experience, and insurance requirements.

Some states will allow third-party examinations like the NAHI or ICC while other states curate their own tests. Even if your state does not require certification, you may be well served to earn additional certifications to add heft and credibility to your resume.

Step 5: Continuing Education & Advanced Degrees

After finding work as a building inspector or home inspector, it is important to know that you will need to keep your certificate and/or license active perpetually. These can be achieved by taking tests or continuing education credits as prescribed by your state.

In addition to continuing education, it may be worth your time and energy to earn a bachelors degree in home inspection or building inspection. An advanced degree can help expand your knowledge base and set you apart from other inspectors in your region.

Top Degrees in Building Inspection & Home Inspection

Earning a degree or certificate in home inspection and/or building inspection can help set you up for success in your career.  Choosing the best degree for you will take research and organization.  Take the time to establish a priority list before selecting a degree program.

Our college admissions guide will help you organize your thoughts and establish what is important for you prior to making a final decision on your college degree program.  A summary of programs in building inspection and home inspection include the following list.

Certificate Programs in Building Inspection & Home Inspection

A certificate program in building inspection and home inspection can come in a variety of flavors.  In some cases, a certificate program can be a 10-12 credit program touching on the essentials of codes and inspection while other programs are more comprehensive lasting 2-3 years.

To determine which program is best for you, simply connect with a number of accredited colleges and universities found on this resource page.  Students earning a certificate in home inspection and/or building inspection can expect to begin a career in an entry-level position and grow into the career over time.

Associate Degrees in Building Inspection & Home Inspection

An associate degree in inspecting is conferred as an Associate of Science (AS).  Online associate degrees in building inspection and home inspection is designed to last 2-years for full-time students.  AS degrees will mix general education courses with core building courses to provide a well-rounded education to students of all backgrounds.  Liberal arts classes will generally include a combination of history, communications, philosophy, art, and psychology.

Core classes found in a home inspection or building inspection degree will generally include similar curriculum.  Schools will provide key classes in the following type of classes: international building codes, residential blueprint reading, commercial blueprint reading, local codes and ordinances, framing, concrete, foundations, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, residential building codes, and architectural drawing basics.

Bachelor Degrees in Building Inspection & Home Inspection

Bachelor’s degrees in inspections is conferred as a Bachelor of Science (BS).  Degrees at this level will typically take 4-years of full time study dependent upon core requirements and transfer credits allowed by the school.

Much like an associate’s degree, the bachelor degree will meld liberal arts education courses with core building classes.  Both the general education and core classes will be more broad and deep providing students with an even greater level of expertise and understanding.

Students can expect to take upper level classes in construction materials, construction design, home systems, commercial building systems, building envelope inspection techniques, building codes, and uniform standards of home & building inspecting.

School Requirements for Inspectors

In terms of educational requirements, Building Inspector and Home Inspector degree holders will have typically studied the following courses while in college:

Employment in Building & Home Inspection

For students that earn a college degree in Building Inspector and Home Inspector, there are several fields of specialization that one can pursue. The options range from superintendent, general contractor, specialty contractor, civil engineer, budget analyst, electrician, architect, engineering manager, cost estimator, landscape architect, and project manager in the public or private domain to name a few possible career tracks.

Home Inspectors & Building Inspectors Careers

The job growth in the greater Building Inspector and Home Inspector domain are above average.  For example, the rate of job growth for building inspectors is expected to rise 8% through 2024 and for electricians a 14% growth rate is expected during the same period.

Given the broad nature of the Building Inspector and Home Inspector degree, compensation after graduation can vary greatly from career field to career field given prior experience and geographic location.  Related fields include maintenance, repair, manager, project manager, equipment operator, engineer, and equipment repair.

Resources for Inspectors

Associations such as the NACBI and the ASHI provide seasoned professionals and recent graduates with membership benefits, tools, and resources not found in any other organization.  Well-respected organizations such as these help promote the field of building inspectors and provide professional networking opportunities that help advance inspectors both regionally and nationally.

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