Get Your Degree!

Get information on programs from our featured schools.

Cytotechnology is a field of study within medicine focused on the microscopic interpretation of cancer.  A cytotechnologist will be trained to understand a number of biological scales that include cellular behavior, genetics, signaling networks, epigenetics, histology, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations to understand cancerous properties and complexities.  The Cytotechnology degree path seeks to inform students on the genetics of cancer, malignancy of living systems (cells, tissue, organs, blood), physiology of cancer cells, gene expression, viral genes, tumor suppressor genes, cancer proliferation, hormonal factors, signal transduction, cancer proteins, metastasis, and treatment options (genetic, chemical, radiological).

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$116,320

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

68.13%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

26,580

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Cytotechnology Degree

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill or "Carolina") is just one of 16 public universities in North Carolina.  It is located in the charming college town of Chapel Hill.  One of the most highly regarded institutions of higher education in the United States, "Carolina" ranks high for its academic quality, affordability, diversity, social engagement and international presence.

Consistently ranking among the top five or six U.S. universities for the quality of its research programs, research faculty at "Carolina" consistently attract strong funding for their work. Faculty garnered more than $800 million in research contracts and grant funding in 2010.

Many undergraduate and graduate programs at UNC-Chapel Hill receive high marks. Receiving particularly high marks are the school's city and regional planning programs, MBA, healthcare management and nursing programs, and its School of Public Health, School of Medicine, School of Education and School of Law.  UNC-Chapel Hill is also noted for its excellent creative arts programs, producing many great visual artists, actors, dancers, musicians and writers over the years.

History

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered the same year that George Washington was inaugurated as president (1789), and first opened its doors to students in 1795.  It was the nation's first public university, and also the only one to award degrees in the 18th century.

Academics

The UNC-Chapel Hill's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a summer session.

Colleges, Schools and Centers

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Dentistry
  • School of Education
  • Eshelman School of Pharmacy
  • Friday Center for Continuing Education
  • General College
  • Gillings School of Global Public Health
  • Graduate School
  • Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • School of Government
  • School of Information & Library Science
  • School of Journalism & Mass Communication
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Social Work
  • Summer School

Student Life

Students at Carolina can get involved in the more than 600 student groups, clubs and organizations available that focus on politics, the arts, public service, recreation, academics, research, and much more. The university magazine and online blog, Blue & White, is one of many ways for Carolina students to connect. There are also numerous journals and other media outlets available on campus to help students keep up with the news or become involved.  Many cultural events and performances are available on campus year round.  Campus recreation includes fitness classes, intramural sports and many adventure trips.

Campus housing is available, along with numerous on-campus dining options.  Student health services are available, as are academic services, and many other resources that are accessible via MyUNC.

Traditions

The mascot of Carolina's "Tar Heels" is the ram. The white ram's antlers are traditionally painted light blue to represent the university's colors of white and light blue.

Athletics

UNC-Chapel Hill's athletic program produces some of the top college athletes in the country, and the Carolina "Tar Heels" men and women's teams compete in 28 sports.

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Community Life

Chapel Hill is situated in the rolling, wooded hills of North Carolina.  It is located three hours from the Blue Ridge Mountains and equidistance from the Atlantic coast.  Chapel Hill is one of three points in The Research Triangle, an area that is noteworthy for being a top location to live, do business and conduct scientific research. The other two "points" in the "triangle" are the cities of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina.  The area is considered by many publications to be one of the best places to live in America.

Acceptance Rate

22.63

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

George Washington University (GW) is located in the heart of Washington, D.C., a short distance from the White House. Students and faculty of GW have the opportunity to work on projects alongside leaders of politics, science, law and many other disciplines. Students also have the opportunity to intern on Capitol Hill, or attend national events and listen to world leaders speak. The commencement ceremonies for graduates are held on the National Mall.

The three major campuses of GW University are the Foggy Bottom Campus and Mount Vernon Campus in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Virginia. All the campuses offer excellent facilities, including a library system that houses more than two million volumes, and opportunities to attend professional sports events, headline entertainment, top art exhibits, and more. Off campus and distance learning is also available through online courses.

The GW alumni are internationally recognized, and include former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Arnold "Red" Auerbach, former coach of the Boston Celtics, actors Alec Baldwin and Kerry Washington, and more than 50 Fulbright scholars, among others.

GW University offers hundreds of options for academic majors and minors at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Students can choose their major and minor from among the following academic interest areas:

  • Business & Management
  • Engineering & Technology
  • Health, Medicine & Nursing
  • History & Government
  • International Studies
  • Literature & Language
  • Media, Journalism & Communication
  • Professional Studies
  • Religion & Philosophy
  • Science & Mathematics
  • Security and Public Safety
  • Social & Human Behavior
  • Visual & Performing Arts

History

The George Washington University was founded in 1821 as "Columbian College" through an Act of Congress. It was established in response to George Washington's vision of an institution in the nation's capital that would educate and prepare its future leaders. Washington died before his vision was realized, but President James Monroe and others were committed to carrying out the venture. The university opened with three faculty members and 30 students enrolled.

Now the largest university in the District of Columbia, GW is comprised of three campuses: Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. GW also has several graduate education centers in the D.C. area.

Academics

The academic calendar for the George Washington University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and multiple shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Law School
  • School of Engineering & Applied Science
  • Graduate School of Education & Human Development
  • School of Business
  • Elliott School of International Affairs
  • School of Public Health & Health Services
  • College of Professional Studies
  • School of Nursing

Student Life

There are more than 300 student clubs, groups and organizations for GW University students to get involved in. Student engagement at GW is high, and when students aren't participating in some of the many community service or leadership events or hands-on learning labs or partnerships available through local organizations, there is plenty to do to engage students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds. GW offers a world-class library, state-of-the-art facilities, and a full range of sports, arts and entertainment.

The Washington, D.C., region offers many cultural and outdoor activities as well. The campuses are all well situated in interesting neighborhoods, with easy access to all the metro area has to offer.

Traditions

There are many rich traditions at the GW University, many of them tied to the school's namesake, President George Washington.

The school colors are Blue and Buff (pale gold), and the GW fight song makes reference to these colors:

Hail to the Buff,
Hail to the Blue,
Hail to the Buff and Blue!
All our lives we'll be proud to say,
We hail from GW! (Go Big Blue!)
Oh, by George, we're happy we can say,
We're GW, here to show the way, so
Raise high the Buff!
Raise high the Blue!
Loyal to GW
You bet we're
Loyal to GW!
Fight!

Athletics

The George Washington University "Colonials" athletic teams compete in 22 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

The GW University has three major campuses: the Foggy Bottom Campus in the "Foggy Bottom neighborhood in the heart of Washington, D.C.; the Mount Vernon Campus in the wooded "Foxhall" neighborhood on the former site of Mount Vernon College; and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia - an area known for its focus on technology research.  Each campus has a distinct ambiance with integrated services and amenities.

In addition to its three major campuses, GW has education facilities throughout the region of Washington, D.C., that serve as centers for graduate professional studies programs.

Community Life

Students at all three main GW campuses enjoy great neighborhoods. The Foggy Bottom Campus is located in 18 city blocks of the "Foggy Bottom" neighborhood, known for its low-rise brick and brownstone buildings and streets lined with trees.

Students on the Mount Vernon Campus will enjoy a quieter setting on 23 acres within a wooded residential area.

Students at GW are very likely to be involved in community activities and service, contributing to hundreds of organizations from non-profits to politics. Students in the GW athletics department are active volunteers of community organizations, including motivational presentations to local high school groups, clean-up activities at local parks and facilities, assisting local youth sports, and more.

Acceptance Rate

40.84

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Saint Louis University provides a variety of program options for students to aid them in their growth and development. The school is located in Saint Louis, MO and operated as a private institution. The Roman Catholic affiliation of this school is an important part of the history, education and mission that defines the school. Approximately eighteen thousand students are enrolled yearly at SLU.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences

Students applying for admission are usually asked to submit an application, transcripts, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by admissions staff. The majority of students accepted to Saint Louis University achieve an SAT score between 1078 to 1330, or an ACT composite score within the range of 25 to 30. This school has an acceptance rate of about 62 percent of which only 21 percent decided to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at slu.edu.

Tuition is approximately $37,000 per year, though it may change based on any number of circumstances. Students may visit the school's tuition calculator to see the personalize cost of attendance. Housing is available for students, which costs about $5,900 per year. Students enrolled at SLU may qualify for aid which is generally loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

Saint Louis University has a variety of athletic programs overseen by the NCAA. Athletic programs that are available include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Students may visit the Saint Louis University website to get a complete list of areas of study, student services, and more.

Acceptance Rate

58.28

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

Rutgers University is the state university of New Jersey.  It is considered one of the top research universities in the nation with a history of scientific innovation. Based on its faculty's productivity, such as number of books published, grants awarded and cited articles, Rutgers is ranked quite high among other U.S. universities. It is ranked second in mathematics education, third in Italian Language and Literature, third in Women's and Gender Studies, and fifth in Global Affairs and Atmospheric Science.

Rutgers provides degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels, as well as continuing education for professional and personal advancement. Rutgers offers a variety of educational program options from elementary school students to state policymakers.  Many working professionals or busy parents can benefit from the flexibility offered by Rutgers' online courses, satellite campuses, certificate programs, professional education and lifelong learning programs.

History

Rutgers University is the nation's eighth oldest institution of higher learning and has a very rich history of innovation and leadership.  Rutgers boasts many renowned alumni that include award-winning scientists, authors, astronauts, actors, military officers, members of U.S. Congress, athletes and a vice president of the United States.

Rutgers was chartered nearly 245 years ago as Queen's College, a Dutch Reformed college created to train church clergy and also provide general education.  In 1825, Queen's College was renamed Rutgers College in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers, a hero of the revolutionary war.

Academics

At Rutgers University, students and lifelong learners can choose from diverse degree and study programs at campuses in New Brunswick, Newark and Camden.  Students can fulfill major requirements toward a degree or elect to learn about a subject of interest.  Classes are available during the days or evenings, depending on the program and location.

Rutgers University's academic calendar follows the semester system, with a fall and spring semester as well as a summer session.

Colleges / Schools

There are 27 schools and colleges on three campuses at Rutgers University, offering comprehensive degree programs at all levels as well as professional and continuing studies.

New Brunswick Campus:

School of Arts and Sciences

School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy

Mason Gross School of the Arts

Rutgers Business School - Newark and New Brunswick

School of Communication and Information

School of Engineering

School of Management and Labor Relations

School of Social Work

College of Nursing

Graduate School - New Brunswick

Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology

Graduate School of Education

Newark Campus:

Newark College of Arts and Sciences

University College - Newark

College of Nursing

Graduate School - Newark

Rutgers Business School - Newark and New Brunswick

School of Criminal Justice

School of Law - Newark

School of Public Affairs and Administration

Camden Campus:

Camden College of Arts and Sciences

University College - Camden

School of Business - Camden

Graduate School - Camden

School of Law - Camden

Student Life

Rutgers University holds an annual "Fall Involvement Fair" on its Voorhees Mall where students can learn about all the clubs and activities available to them at the university.  So numerous are the student organizations and clubs at Rutgers that they are broken down into categories: academic, cultural, media/publications, performing arts, and social and political act

Students new to campus can join one of many orientation programs to learn about the university, college life and all the activities available.  There are six different student centers at Rutgers-New Brunswick, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, a climbing well, roller hockey rink and sports facilities. 

Fraternities and Sororities

Greek life is a longstanding tradition at Rutgers University, where the first Greek letter fraternities, Delta Phi and Zeta Psi were founded in 1845. Fraternities at that time were considered subversive and forbidden by the faculty, so they continued as secret societies.

Today the fraternities and sororities at Rutgers are out in the open and there is a thriving Greek community with more than 70 fraternities and sororities on its campuses.

There are "traditional" fraternities and sororities as well as those that are historically African-American, Latino/a, Asian-interest and more.  Different chapters hold annual events that range from formal dances to social mixers and barbecues.

Traditions

There are many traditional school songs at Rutgers, dating back to 1873.  "The Rutgers History Lesson" provides an overview of the rich history of the university, as well as its Dutch heritage and participation in the American Revolutionary War.

The 1947 screen musical, "High Button Shoes," was set in New Brunswick, New Jersey and featured the school's song titled "Nobody Ever Died for Dear Old Rutgers."

"On the Banks of the Old Raritan" the Rutgers Alma Mater was created in 1847 and was first performed by the Rutgers Glee Club.

When cheering on a Rutgers athletics team, the fans in the stands will shout the traditional Rutgers cheer of "RU, rah, rah!"

Athletics

The Rutgers Scarlet Knights boast a winning football team that is the only NCAA Division I football team in the Greater New Jersey/New York area.  The football team also scores well in its academic progress.  There are many strong collegiate sports at Rutgers including women's basketball, men's baseball, soccer, wrestling, lacrosse and volleyball, among others.

In addition to its many varsity athletics, Rutgers offers numerous intramural sports leagues throughout the year.  More information on all Rutgers athletics can be found at Scarletknights.com.

Satellite Campuses

Rutgers University is made up of three campuses: Rutgers-New Brunswick, Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden.  The Rutgers-New Brunswick campus is actually made up of five campuses: Busch Campus, George H. Cook Campus, College Avenue Campus and Douglass Campus.

Community Life

The New Brunswick campus of Rutgers University has ivy covered buildings and the wide, open lawns of a historical university that dates back to 1766. The Rutgers-New Brunswick campus is situated in a lively urban area that has many art galleries, theatres and cafes, as well as nearby hiking trails, a golf course and the Rutgers Stadium.

There are many residential communities and living options on the Rutgers campuses.  A women-only residential hall is offered on Douglass Campus.  Other options include a science and engineering hall that also offers skills development programs.  There is a house for adult students who are either returning to college or entering college more than five years after finishing high school.

Acceptance Rate

61.22

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

SUNY College at Plattsburgh, a public institution, offers an assortment of educational opportunities, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Plattsburgh, New York, the school resides in a rural setting for students to study in. SUNY College at Plattsburgh has a yearly student enrollment of nearly six thousand. Here is a list of some of the popular programs SUNY College at Plattsburgh offers:

  • Psychology
  • Education
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Security And Protective Services
  • English Language And Literature
To be considered for admissions, applicants may be required to complete an application, provide letters of recommendations, and submit school transcripts, which are then studied by admissions officials. The most common exam scores among applicants accepted to SUNY College at Plattsburgh are in the range of 20 to 24 for the ACT exam, or 950 to 1110 on the SAT. 48% of students that apply are accepted to this school, of which 27 percent choose to attend. More information from the admissions office can be found at plattsburgh.edu. The tuition at this school varies based on the state of residence of the student. In-state residents pay close to $7,100 per year, while out-of-state residents are charged $17,000 for the year. On-campus housing is available for students and costs about $6,700 per year. Some students at SUNY College at Plattsburgh may be eligible for financial aid, which is generally provided in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. Athletic programs are available at SUNY College at Plattsburgh through the NCAA, allowing students to participate in intercollegiate sports. Athletic programs available may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Ice Hockey (NCAA Division III)
Students can visit the school's http://www.plattsburgh.edu to view additional information.

Acceptance Rate

58.48

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Thomas Jefferson University is a nonprofit private college that has a large number of degree programs available for students to choose from. The school is located in Philadelphia, PA, in a predominantly urban area. Nearly three thousand students enroll at Thomas Jefferson University annually.

Areas of study available at Thomas Jefferson University include:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Liberal Arts And Sciences

To be considered for admissions, applicants may be required to fill out an application, write a personal statement, and submit school transcripts, which are then studied by the admissions office.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is close to $35,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. The price of on-campus housing is around $3,800 per year. This school may provide financial aid for students that are eligible as grants and loans.

Students can visit the school's http://www.jefferson.edu to see additional information.

Acceptance Rate

65.88

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

Are you interested in a career as a pharmacist? Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences offers one of the oldest Pharmacy Doctorate's in the country and its Vermont campus is the only Pharmacy program in the state. ACPHS also offers Bachelor's degrees in Microbiology, Chemistry, and other health related sciences. Several graduate programs are offered as well, in Pharmaceutical Science, Health Outcomes Research, and more! ACPHS is a small private college located in Albany, New York and there is a smaller campus in Colchester, Vermont.  Only about 300 students attend the Vermont campus, while nearly 1,500 enroll annually at the New York campus. The school is situated in the heart of downtown, close to shopping and dining. There are numerous outdoor activities available for the nature lover or if you prefer the concrete jungle, big cities like Boston and New York are just a few hours away. ACPHS offers many different opportunities for students to travel abroad to places like Belize, West Africa, Costa Rica, and other exotic locations! ACPHS believes intercultural experiences can be invaluable for future healthcare and pharmacy workers. The college also offers career planning and placement services to help students plan their career paths. Employers are encouraged to contact the school about job openings or internships. They can participate in the school's career fair or post the opportunity on the school's job board. Log on to www.acphs.edu/admissions to request more information about the many programs available to graduate and undergraduate students.

Acceptance Rate

71.07

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

CUNY Hunter College is located in the city of Manhattan in New York. It is the largest college in the City University of New York (CUNY) system. Hunter College is one of the oldest public colleges in the U.S., and offers more than 170 academic programs at the undergraduate and graduate degree levels.

Hunter College offers study programs in its well known School of Arts and Sciences, and schools of Education, Nursing, Social Work, Health Professions and School of Public Health. In 2011, the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College began offering the first of several Ph.D. programs at Hunter.

In addition to its degree programs, Hunter College also offers numerous accelerated and advanced certificate programs. Research is thriving at Hunter College, most notably in its Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function, Center for Puerto Rican Studies (CENTRO), and the Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging and Longevity.

Alumni of Hunter College have become published authors, well-known artists, and civic leaders. Many have been Fulbright and Mellon scholars, as well as recipients of prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health. Faculty members at Hunter College are also well recognized, and include national grant recipients, contributors to leading academic journals, and cutting-edge researchers.

History

Hunter College was founded in New York in 1870 as a teacher training college for young women. It was first called the "Normal College of the City of New York." The curriculum gradually expanded to become a fully accredited liberal arts college for women. In 1914, the college changed its name to "Hunter College of the City of New York" for its first president, Thomas Hunter. In 1961, the City University of New York (CUNY) was established, and Hunter College became the founding member. In 1964, male students were admitted to Hunter College, though it would largely be known for its significant contribution to women's education in the United States.

Academics

The academic calendar for CUNY Hunter College offers traditional fall and spring terms, a shorter, winter session, and two summer sessions (8 weeks, and 11 weeks in duration).

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of Education
  • School of Health Sciences
  • Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing
  • CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College

CUNY Hunter College has several centers, which offer a variety of academic and research study programs. Centers at Hunter include:

  • Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function
  • Center for Puerto Rican Studies (CENTRO)
  • Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging and Longevity

Student Life

Social and community engagement are integral to CUNY Hunter College, and students at Hunter will find many student clubs, organizations, projects and activities to become involved in on campus and throughout the community.

New students at CUNY Hunter College will appreciate the accessibility of the Visitors Center, and the helpfulness of Visitors Center Associates, who wear purple vests and are available to help people find their way around campus.

Student services at CUNY Hunter College include:

  • AccessABILITY (for students with disabilities)
  • Advising Services
  • Athletics & Recreation
  • Behavioral Response Team
  • Campus Housing (Brookdale Residence Hall)
  • Career Development Services
  • Center for Student Achievement
  • Children's Learning Center
  • Counseling & Wellness Services
  • International Students
  • Scholarships & Grants
  • Student Activities
  • Student/Club Websites Accounts
  • Student Center (Sylvia E. Fishman)
  • Student Veteran Services
  • Blackboard Online Learning
  • Center for Student Achievement
  • Chanin Language Center
  • Computer Laboratories
  • ESL Resources
  • Physical Sciences Learning Center
  • Reading/Writing Center
  • Social Sciences Computing Laboratory
  • Socrates Center, Department of Biological Sciences

Traditions

The traditional school colors for Hunter College are purple, white and gold. The school mascot is the hawk, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the Hunter College "Hawks."

Athletics

The Hunter College "Hawks" athletic teams participate in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Indoor Track and Field
  • Outdoor Track and Field
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Indoor Track and Field
  • Outdoor Track and Field
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Community Life

CUNY Hunter College has a strong mission of community service, and Hunter students, faculty and staff members are involved in public service activities throughout New York City. Community members are encouraged to contact Hunter College to explore new opportunities for Hunter's participation in community life.

The cultural, social, artistic and intellectual programs and services that Hunter engages in with and for its community include continuing education, non-degree programs, faculty and administration jobs, The Kaye Playhouse, The Bertha & Karl Leubsdorf Gallery, The Frederick Loewe Theatre and Lang Recital Hall, athletic events to cheer on the "Hawks," The Hunter Bookstore, renting space at Hunter, and more.

Acceptance Rate

35.17

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Daemen College is a nonprofit private institution that has many majors available for students to choose from. The school is located in Amherst, NY, in a predominantly suburban area. Daemen College has an annual student enrollment of approximately 3,000.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Education
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies

Students applying for admission are usually required to submit an application, transcripts, standardized test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the admissions committee. 60% of those who apply are accepted to Daemen College, of which 31% choose to attend. More information from the admissions office can be found at daemen.edu.

The cost of tuition is around $25,000, but may change from year to year. Students are encouraged to visit the school's tuition calculator to better estimate their personal tuition costs. The price of on-campus housing is approximately $8,500 annually. Students at Daemen College may be eligible for aid which is generally grants and loans.

The mascot for Daemen College is the "Wildcats", and they participate in intercollegiate athletics through oversight by the NAIA. Athletic programs available may include the following:

  • Basketball (NAIA Division II)
  • Golf (NAIA Division II)
  • Soccer (NAIA Division II)

Students can visit the website to get a complete list of academic programs offered, financial aid details, and more that is available at this school.

Acceptance Rate

61.56

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

About
Edgewood College, located in Madison, Wisconsin, was founded in 1927 in the Dominican Catholic tradition. The school is based on the shore of Lake Wingra, on a 55 acre campus on the western end of Madison. The school was formed through the donation of the Edgewood estate to the Dominican Sisters in 1873 by Cadwallader Washburn. Originally used to found a St. Regina Academy, a private boarding school for girls, which burned shortly after its opening. A second school was built, sacred heart, after which the school sought to add a junior college which it received approval for in 1927 and grew into Edgewood College.

Academics
Edgewood College offers a variety of courses and programs in a number of fields of study, primarily taught through a comprehensive liberal arts curriculum. Students will take courses in general education, electives and upper and lower division level classes related to one's chosen major. In addition, students may pursue a secondary minor degree through a series of courses required by the minor program.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
Admissions is handles at Edgewood College through a review process that requires students to submit transcripts, test scores,. letters of recommendation, a personal essay and the completed application. Once materials are submitted, the school will review the packet and make a decision regarding admissions. Students will be notified after the decision is made, with admitted students receiving information pertinent to the start of their academic career at the school. Financial Aid is available in the form of loans, grants and scholarships, and are awarded based on need as determined by the information provided in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Acceptance Rate

72.37

Student to Faculty Ratio

10:1

About
Winona State University, located in Winona, Minnesota, was founded in 1858 and is consistently ranked among the best 100 colleges in the United States in both quality and value. The school was originally founded as a normal school to train teachers for schools throughout the state, and was the first tax supported school west of the Mississippi River. The school began operation in 1860, but closed for three years during the Civil War, resuming operation 1864.The State Normal School became Winona Teachers College in 1921 and began conferring bachelor degrees. The school's curriculum evolved over the next two decades, though rapid growth was seen after World War II when the school experienced a boom in enrollment. The resulting changes, added courses, and new programs resulted in the school becoming Winona State University. Today the school operates five colleges across three campuses, all dedicated to providing excellent education at a reasonable cost.

Academics
Winona State University offers a variety of programs and degrees that allow students to pursue the career and education that best reflects their personal goals for their future. Such programs take approximately four years to complete and require the student to take a general education courses combined with lower and upper division courses as well electives that allow for study of ideas outside of one's major. Student's may also choose to take on a minor degree that requires the addition of a set number of courses that provide education in a secondary field. The school also offers 30 graduate programs that allow students to continue their education. Such programs require a bachelor's degree, high test scores and a solid academic transcript to be considered for admission.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
Individuals interested in enrolling at Winona State University must complete and submit the application for admission, provide pertinent transcripts and test scores, and have completed the general education requirements of a high school education. The submitted application will be reviewed by a committee. Once a final decision is rendered the student will be notified, and if admitted will be provided materials preparing him or her for their educational career at WSU. Admissions requirements will vary for transfer students and for students applying to graduate programs.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants and scholarships. Students in need of financial assistance must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the information from which is used by the school's financial aid department to determine the extent of a student's financial need and their aid program eligibility when constructing a financial aid packet. Aid must be reapplied for prior to each academic year and students may be asked to provide additional information at random prior to the disbursement of funds to verify the information provided on the FAFSA.

Acceptance Rate

67.91

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Marian University is a nonprofit private college that has a large selection of degrees available for students to choose from. The school is located in Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin, in a predominantly urban area. The school maintains a Roman Catholic affiliation, which is evident in the role it plays in program curriculums and daily life at the school. Approximately two thousand students are enrolled annually at Marian University. Students can choose from many areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Education
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Security And Protective Services
  • Psychology
Students applying for admission are usually required to submit an application, school records, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the school. The majority of students at this school scored between 18 to 23 on the ACT. Approximately 80% of all applicant were accepted at Marian University, with 37% of those admitted choosing to enroll. More information on admissions can be found at marianuniversity.edu. The cost of tuition is approximately $25,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to use the school's price of attendance calculator to better estimate their personal tuition costs. On-campus housing is available for students and costs approximately $3,900 each year. Some students at Marian University may be eligible for financial aid, which is generally provided in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. Athletic programs are available at Marian University through the NCAA, allowing students to participate in intercollegiate sports. Available athletic programs offered may include:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Golf (NCAA Division III)
To see a full list of academic programs offered, enrollment information, financial aid details, and more, please visit the school's website at http://www.marianuniversity.edu.

Acceptance Rate

64.61

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

About
The University of Mississippi, located in Oxford, Mississippi, was founded in 1844. The school's first class was comprised of 80 student, and was the state's only source for public postsecondary education for 23 years, as well as the state's only comprehensive university for 110 years. The school is affectionately referred to as Ole Miss, and was one of the first institutions to offer an engineering program as well as a state supported law program. It is also the first southern school to admit women and to hire female faculty members. Over the years Ole Miss has added schools of study and expanded its program offerings, having become a full fledged university granting degrees at the undergraduate and graduate level to a yearly enrollment of over 18,000 student. Ole Miss operates several campuses to provide a wider service area, and has continued to expand its offerings across these campuses as part of its educational mission. Ole Miss is one of the south's best research institutions, providing a variety of options and opportunities to potential and current students through its comprehensive and specialized programs of study.

Academics
The University of Mississippi offers over 100 areas of study, allowing students to pursue the programs that best reflect their goals, ambitions and future plans. Degrees are earned through the completion of lower and upper division courses alongside general education requirements and elective courses that allow for study in non related fields. Students may also choose to pursue a minor degree through the addition of extra courses of study that provide an extra area of study and expertise outside of their major. Graduate programs are also available for student though these programs have separate admissions requirements which typically involve high scores on graduate level exams, an appropriate degree earned, and a strong academic record.

Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid
Future students at the University of Mississippi must qualify for admission by meeting the admissions requirements used by the school. This includes a cumulative GPA of 3.2, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 with an ACT score of 16 or a SAT score of 760, a class rank in the upper 50% with an ACT score of 16 or a SAT score of 760, or a GPA of 2.0 with an ACT score of 18 or a SAT reading and math score of 860. Students who meet the NCAA certification requirements may also considered for admission. Student must submit a completed application for admission, completing all required essays and providing all pertinent transcripts and test scores. The submitted information will be reviewed by the admissions committee and a decision will be rendered, after which admitted students will be notified and provided the necessary information for beginning their college experience.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. Students requiring financial assistance must submit a completed Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the information from which is used to determine financial needs of the student, aid program eligibility and monetary awards in the form of a financial aid package. Financial aid must be reapplied prior to the start of each academic year. Students may be randomly chosen to provide additional financial information in order to verify the FAFSA's accuracy due to new federal regulations for aid.

Athletics
The Ole Miss Rebels participate in intercollegiate athletics through the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) . The school has a long history of athletic excellence, particularly in the area of football which has become a staple of the institution. Intercollegiate athletics provide participating students a forum to engage in healthy competition while developing skills and habits that are useful in one's personal, academic and professional life such as teamwork, discipline, leadership, responsibility and good health. Students will also experience the camaraderie associated with experiencing the shared successes and failures with their teammates while working to maintain academic success as required by the school.

Athletic programs offered include:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Rifle
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Acceptance Rate

88.14

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

University of Kansas (KU) is a public research and teaching college with one main campus and multiple satellite campuses.  KU offers high-tech laboratories, interactive classrooms, and several performance venues and athletic arenas.  The university's illustrious alumni include the inventor of basketball, Pulitzer Prize winners, astronauts, governors, artists, and a Nobel Prize winner.

Often referred to as "the castle on the hill," KU's scenic main campus of red-roofed buildings and forested hills is located at the top Mount Oread in Lawrence, Kansas.  The KU has strong academic programs, and offers more than 190 undergraduate majors, numerous master's level degrees and more than 12 graduate and professional doctoral degree programs.

History

KU was founded in 1866 as The Kansas State University.  The university's first major building was completed in 1872. Old Fraser Hall, designed by renowned architect John G. Haskell, came to symbolize KU.  This structure was, however, later torn down due to structural problems. 

In 1873, 23-year-old Flora Richardson became the university's first female graduate.  She was also class valedictorian that year.

Academics

The University of Kansas academic calendar follows the semester system, with fall and spring semesters, and a summer term.

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Allied Health
  • School of Architecture, Design and Planning
  • School of Arts
  • School of Business
  • School of Education
  • School of Engineering
  • School of Journalism and Mass Communications
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Music
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Pharmacy
  • School of Social Welfare
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Student Life

There are 642 student groups, clubs, and organizations currently registered at KU, including intramural sports leagues and local chapters of fraternities and sororities. There is plenty to get involved in at KU. The Student Involvement and Leadership Center has more information about groups, events, and service and leadership opportunities for students.

Athletics

The Kansas "Jayhawks" athletic teams compete in 16 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its beautiful Lawrence Campus, the University of Kansas has several satellite campuses that include:

  • The University of Kansas Medical Center (Kansas City, Kansas)
  • The University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita (Wichita, Kansas)
  • The University of Kansas, Edwards Campus (Overland Park, Kansas)
  • Life Span Institute at Parsons (Parsons, Kansas)
  • The University of Kansas Public Management Center (Topeka, Kansas)
  • Juniper Gardens Children's Project (Kansas City, Kansas)
  • Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center (Hutchinson, Kansas)
  • School of Medicine - Salina (Salina, Kansas)

Community Life

Students at KU and the local community can enjoy many renowned performing arts venues that offer music, dance and theatre.  KU is also home to an excellent archives collection, as well as the many art, plant and animal specimen collections that are open to the public.

Acceptance Rate

93.1

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, a nonprofit private institution, offers a variety of educational opportunities, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Winona, Minnesota, the campus offers a rural setting for students to study in. The school maintains a Roman Catholic affiliation, which is evident in the role it plays in program curriculums and daily life at the school. About 6,100 students enroll at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota yearly.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Education
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Psychology
  • Family And Consumer Sciences

The admissions process starts with the submission of an application, student records, and test scores, which are then reviewed by the admissions committee. Either the SAT or ACT exam must be taken in order to apply to SMU. Scores within the range of 20 to 25 on the ACT or 870 to 1120 on the SAT are recommended to greatly increase your chances for getting accepted. 72% of those students that apply are accepted to Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, of which 32 percent choose to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at smumn.edu.

Tuition is approximately $30,000 per year, though it may vary based on different types of circumstances. Students should check the school's tuition calculator to determine cost. Housing is available on-campus for students. The yearly cost of housing is approximately $4,400. Financial aid may be provided to students that meet the necessary requirements.

Athletic programs are available at SMU through the NCAA, allowing students to participate in intercollegiate sports. Athletic programs that are available include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)

Students who would like to learn more about this school can check out their website at http://www.smumn.edu.

Acceptance Rate

91.99

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Thiel College, a nonprofit private institution, offers a large number of educational opportunities, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Greenville, Pennsylvania, the school offers a rural setting for students to study in. The Evangelical Lutheran Church affiliation of this school is an important part of the history, education and vision that defines the school. Approximately 1,100 students are enrolled per year at Thiel College.

Areas of study offered at Thiel College include but are not limited to:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Education
  • Security And Protective Services
  • Social Sciences

To be considered for admissions, applicants may be required to fill out an application, provide letters of recommendations, and submit school transcripts, which are then evaluated by the admissions staff. Students may provide either the SAT or ACT scores to be considered for admissions to Thiel College. A score between 840 - 1030 on the SAT, or 18 - 22 for the ACT is common among accepted students. 64% of students that apply are admitted to Thiel College, of which 23% choose to enroll. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is nearly $27,000, but may change each year. Students are encouraged to use the school's price of attendance calculator to better understand their cost of attendance. Housing may be available for students that want to live on-campus for around a cost of $5,300 annually. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the necessary requirements by way of scholarships, grants, and loans.

The Thiel College Tomcats participate in a number of intercollegiate athletic programs, with competitions managed and overseen by the NCAA. Sports available may include the following:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division III)

Contact information, admission forms, programs offered, and much more can be viewed on school's website at http://www.thiel.edu.

Acceptance Rate

79.37

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

Oakland is a public institution that has a fair number of majors available for students to choose from. The school is located in Rochester Hills, Michigan, in a predominantly suburban area. Approximately 19,000 students are enrolled annually at Oakland University.

Areas of study available at Oakland include:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Education
  • Communications And Journalism
  • Business And Marketing Studies

To be considered for admissions, applicants may be asked to fill out an application, write a personal statement, and submit any transcripts or test scores, which are then reviewed by the admissions staff. Most students accepted to Oakland score in a range of 19 to 25 on the ACT exam. An estimated 70% of all applicant were accepted at this school, with 34% of those admitted choosing to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at oakland.edu.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is different for in-state and out-of-state residents. In-state residents pay approximately $11,000, while nonresidents pay $26,000 for the year. Oakland University may help with costs by offering financial aid for students who qualify by way of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

Athletic programs are available at Oakland University through the NCAA, allowing students to compete in intercollegiate sports. Available athletic programs offered:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Golf (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Students can visit the Oakland University website to see a complete list of areas of study, admissions information, and more that is available at this school.

Acceptance Rate

83.05

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indiana's top urban university, is considered by U.S. News and World Report to be one of the top five "up and coming" universities in America.  IUPUI has top-ranked programs in public and environmental affairs, law, nursing and health.

IUPUI offers 200 different degree programs from both Indiana and Purdue universities.  It boasts 21 schools and, since it is located near downtown Indianapolis, offers many opportunities for civic involvement, internships, business and research partnerships, and more.

Known predominantly through the years as a research and health sciences university, IUPUI has expanded to include many innovative and interdisciplinary programs.  Its mission statement promises to deliver the following to its constituents:

  • Teaching and Learning
  • Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

With each of these core activities characterized by:

  • Collaboration within and across disciplines and with the community
  • A commitment to ensuring diversity, and
  • Pursuit of best practices

History

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis was founded in 1969 as a partnership between two universities: Indiana University and Purdue University.  The partnership was formed in order to combine all the various schools of both universities together, in one location. 2005 marked the year when all the IUPUI schools had moved to one campus in Indianapolis, the IUPUI campus, a few short blocks from the Indiana State Capitol.

Academics

The IUPUI academic calendar follows the semester system, with fall, spring and summer sessions.

Colleges and Schools

IUPUI has 21 schools, with many departments in each, offering 200 academic degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels.  Many professional certificates are also offered.

  • IU Herron School of Art and Design
  • IU Kelley School of Business
  • IU School of Continuing Studies
  • IU Graduate School
  • IU School of Dentistry
  • IU School of Education
  • Purdue School of Engineering and Technology
  • IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
  • IUPUI Honors College
  • IU School of Informatics
  • IU School of Journalism
  • IU School of Law
  • IU School of Liberal Arts
  • IU School of Library and Information Science
  • IU School of Medicine
  • IU School of Nursing
  • IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management
  • IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs
  • Purdue School of Science
  • IU School of Social Work
  • IUPUI University College

Student Life

The Office of Student Involvement, true to its name, encourages students to become involved in one of the many student clubs or organizations available on campus.  IUPUI promotes the idea that each student should find his/her niche in the campus community to enrich the educational experience.  To that end, there are many fraternities and sororities available to students, as well as many intramural sports leagues, and more.

Athletics

The IUPUI "Jaguars" athletics teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Community Life

IUPUI is dedicated to its many programs involving students in civic engagement, and it has been recognized for its commitment to these efforts.  The IUPUI Center for Service and Learning offers many programs for community involvement that include volunteering with non-profit agencies, participation in a service learning course, voluntary work for political campaigns, employment in community work-study positions, and more.

Acceptance Rate

80.73

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

MU, a public institution, offers a variety of program options, allowing students to choose which major is right for them. Located in Huntington, West Virginia, the campus offers an urban setting for students to study in. MU has an annual student enrollment of about 14,000. Here is a list of some of the popular programs MU offers:

  • Liberal Arts And Sciences
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Psychology
Students applying for admission are generally required to submit an application, school records, test scores and any requested letters of recommendations, which will then be reviewed by admissions staff. Students may submit either the ACT or SAT scores to be considered for admissions to Marshall University. A score in a range of 890 - 1120 on the SAT, or 19 - 24 for the ACT is usually submitted among admitted students. This school has an admissions rate of 81% of which only 85% chose to enroll.  A full suite of admissions information can be obtained by calling MU or by requesting information from this page. The tuition at this school varies based on the state of residence of the student. In-state residents pay around $6,200 per year and out-of-state residents are charged $15,000 per year. The price of on-campus housing is around $5,300 annually. This school may provide financial aid for students who qualify as grants and loans. The Marshall University Thundering Herd participate in several intercollegiate athletic programs, overseen by the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include the following:
  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Football (NCAA Division I-A)
Students who would like to see more about MU can check out their website at marshall.edu/.

Acceptance Rate

86.89

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public research university located in Norfolk, Virginia. Designated as a "high-research-activity" university, the ODU researchers generate more than $80 million in annual funding through 400 or more research projects. Research areas of particular note include programs in bioelectrics, modeling and simulation, alternative energies, nanotechnologies, and maritime health and systems.

Considered a "Best Southeastern College" by the Princeton Review, ODU offers more than 65 bachelor's degrees, 56 master's degrees, 41 doctoral degrees and two educational specialist degrees. Distance learning is available through ODU, which offers more than 50 degree programs online, via satellite or video-streaming and CD.

Faculty at ODU have be widely recognized for their achievements, and have won more than 20 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Awards, among others.

History

Old Dominion University was founded in 1930 as the Norfolk Division of the College of William and Mary. It became an independent institution of higher education in 1962. In 1969, ODU gained university status.

Academics

The academic calendar for Old Dominion University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. At ODU, these are referred to as "First Semester," "Second Semester," and "Summer Semester." The Summer Semester is divided into five sessions.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Arts and Letters
  • College of Business and Public Administration
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering and Technology
  • College of Health Sciences
  • College of Sciences
  • Honors College

Student Life

There are roughly 300 student clubs and organizations available for involvement at Old Dominion University. These include groups that focus on academic, professional, political, religious, social, leadership and many other interests. Students can also participate in programs for volunteer service and various hobbies. The Office of Student Activities and Leadership also organizes access to the campus radio station (WODU) and the student-run newspaper "The Mace and Crown."

On campus and off campus housing are available, and more than 4,000 students live on campus during the academic year. There are many dining options available on and off campus as well.

The ROTC is quite active on campus, and there are many active fraternities and sororities at ODU.

Traditions

The ODU school colors are blue (dark, royal blue) and silver, with white as an accent color. The school mascot is "Old Blue" the lion. The school symbol is a lion with a royal crown on its head, and the athletic teams are nicknamed the "Monarchs." Early in its history, the athletic teams for ODU were nicknamed the "Braves," but this changed once the school became independent. One school tradition is to have students touch up the blue paw prints that are painted on the grounds of the campus, representing all the places where "Old Blue" has traveled.

School spirit is strong at ODU, and on every "Spirit Friday" students and faculty are asked to wear the school colors of blue and silver or ODU apparel. The school Spirit Crew will patrol the campus and reward those who observe the tradition with a prize.

Athletics

The ODU "Monarchs" athletic teams compete in 18 intercollegiate sports at the NCAA Division I level, and the NCAA FCS level. Varsity sports at ODU include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Sailing
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis

Satellite Campuses

The Norfolk Campus is ODU's primary location. Extended campus centers for ODU are:

  • Peninsula Higher Education Center
  • Virginia Beach Higher Education Center
  • Tri-Cities Center
  • Distance Learning Partners

Community Life

ODU has many business and research programs that contribute to the local economy and community. Many ODU programs and camps are designed for community youth, and include sports and engineering camps, science fairs, robotics challenges, a child development center, music groups, a governor's school for the arts, and more.

The City of Norfolk has much to offer in terms of culture, recreation, arts and entertainment. The downtown area of the city is very easy to walk around, and is considered a desirable place to live. There are many distinct and historical neighborhoods, each with their own character. The Freemason Historic District near the Elizabeth River is characterized by tree lined, cobblestone streets. The Granby District is a popular shopping area where many of the early buildings near the Opera House have been converted into residential lofts and trendy homes. There are many more neighborhoods and areas to explore.

Acceptance Rate

89.33

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Mayo Medical School is a nonprofit private graduate level institution located in Rochester. The annual enrollment for the school is about 190 students. Mayo Medical School is a well respected healthcare and medical school and is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, The Higher Learning Commission.

The cost of tuition and fees for the medical school program is around $34,000 annually. Also, the medical school program is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education since 1971.

Students should visit the school's website at http://www.mayo.edu/mms/ to get information on admissions, financial aid, student services and more available.

Acceptance Rate

29.52

Student to Faculty Ratio

8:1

Located near the beautiful rolling hills in Fennimore in Wisconsin, the Southwest Wisconsin Technical College is a technical college that delivers excellent educational opportunities to students as well as empowering the community that it serves. Also known as Southwest Tech, it covers 30 districts including Grant, Lafayette, Crawford and Richland.

The school started accepting enrollees on July 1, 1967 and it was conceived through Chapter 292 Laws of Wisconsin of 1965. Its first ever program was Farm Training considering that Fennimore was largely a farming town back then. Today, Southwest Tech offers associate degrees and technical diplomas. There are about more than 50 courses offered at this community college under diverse disciplines including agriculture, business and marketing, information technology, healthcare, public safety and industrial courses.

Since Southwest Tech only offers associate degrees, students who wish to transfer to other universities and colleges to take up a four-year bachelor’s course can take advantage of the transfer center of the school to assist them in their transfer needs. The University Transfer Program allows students to transfer to many public and private universities within and out of Wisconsin area without any problems.

On the other hand, the tuition fee rate of Southwest Tech is set by the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. For the Academic Year of 2013-2014, the tuition fee rate for in-district student is $122  per credit hour while out-of-district enrollees have to pay $182 per credit hour.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

Sinclair Community College (SCC) is two-year community college in Dayton, Ohio, offering the lowest tuition rate in the state. Sinclair has a range of academic programs that lead to an associate degree, a professional or vocational certificate, or transfer to a four-year institution. Sinclair had a good student-faculty ratio of 19 to one, which means that students get more individual attention at Sinclair than they might at a larger university.

Sinclair is one of only 20 colleges among 1,200 in the nation that is a board member of the League for Innovation in the Community College. Sinclair is also one of only 12 Vanguard Learning Colleges in the U.S. and Canada, named for our "outstanding record of achievement in learning-centered education."

Students have a range of flexible learning options at Sinclair, including distance or online learning, interactive learning, traditional daytime classes on campus, off-campus learning sites, and evening and weekend classes.  Sinclair is the largest regional provider of online education, with more than 180 different online courses.

It is Sinclair's mission to provide affordable, high-quality education that includes a caring approach to teaching and learning to foster individual growth. Through Sinclair, students are empowered with knowledge and skills. According to Sinclair Community College's mission statement, student's success shall hinge on turning these values into action:

  • Dedication to quality and excellence
  • Reliance on anticipation, imagination, and innovation
  • Commitment to responsible citizenship within our community
  • Adherence to the Sinclair credo-"find the need and endeavor to meet it"
  • Confidence in the courage, determination, and diversity of our students, employees, and supporters and belief in unlimited human potential.

History

David A. Sinclair founded Sinclair Community College in 1887 with a mission to "find the need and endeavor to meet it." When the school was founded, classes were offered through the YMCA.

Bookkeeping and mechanical drawing were taught to an all-male student body. By 1910, the curriculum was much broader and the "YMCA College" moved to a larger building. In 1929, the YMCA moved to an even larger building, to support its expanding curriculum that included the Dayton Law School and the Dayton Technical School.

The YMCA College was renamed "Sinclair College" in 1948 in honor of its founder, David A. Sinclair, the Secretary of Dayton YMCA from 1874 to 1902.  By 1959, Sinclair College was still housed in the YMCA buildings, but was independently operated as an institution of higher learning under the jurisdiction of the State of Ohio. In 1966, Ohio crated the Montgomery County Community College District and Sinclair College officially became a community college.

The school acquired 20 acres of land in Dayton Ohio in the late 1960s, and by 1972 the original seven buildings on the new Sinclair Community College campus were completed and ready for operation.

Academics

The academic calendar for Sinclair Community College follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer courses. Each semester has an A-term and a B-term.

Colleges and Schools

The academic units at Sinclair Community College are divided into Academic Divisions, which are:

  • Business & Public Services
  • Liberal Arts, Communication & Social Sciences
  • Life & Health Sciences
  • Science, Mathematics & Engineering

Student Life

Students at Sinclair Community College can choose from more than 40 clubs and organizations on campus for involvement. Student organizations include honor societies and clubs that focus on arts, culture, and more. A unique student club at Sinclair is the Sinclair Disney Club, or Disney Theme Parks and Resorts College Program, which is an internship program with Walt Disney World and Disneyland. Sinclair students may interview with Disney to qualify for an internship at one of the theme parks for 4-6 months.

Student services at Sinclair include:

  • Bookstore
  • Tartan Card - Student ID
  • Academic Advising
  • Career Services
  • Campus Ministry
  • Counseling Services
  • Disability Services
  • English as a Second Language
  • Ombudsman/Student Advocate
  • Arts & Culture
  • Calendar of Events
  • Campus Dining
  • Clarion newspaper
  • Physical Activity Center
  • Student Leadership
  • Tartan Intramural Athletics

Traditions

The school colors for Sinclair Community College are red, black and white, which are colors of their tartan plaid. The athletic teams are nicknamed the Sinclair "Tartans" and the students celebrate "Tartan Pride." The school mascot is a lion dressed in a Scottish kilt in the traditional Tartan Plaid.

Athletics

The Sinclair "Tartans" athletic teams compete in four intercollegiate sports. They compete in the Region XII of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NCAA) and are participating members of the Ohio Community College Athletic Conference (OCCAC).

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Golf
  • Tennis

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main campus in Dayton, Ohio, Sinclair Community College has several satellite learning centers in the area, which are:

  • Englewood
  • Huber Heights
  • Preble County
  • Courseview Campus Center
  • Wright-Patterson AFB
  • Online Learning Campus

Community Life

The Learning Center at Miami Valley Research Park provides facilities, classes and resources to Dayton's technology community. Its mission is to develop the community's IT economy through classes, programs and partnerships.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

About
Central Piedmont Community College, located in Charlotte, North Carolina, was founded in 1963 through the merger of two previously existing institutions, the Central Industrial Education Center and the historically black Mecklenburg College. The schools were merged as a result of the North Carolina Community College Act, taking over the respective properties of the two schools that merged.  The school has grown since its inception from having 12 programs and 1600 students to over 250 programs and 70,000 students a year. The school operates six campuses in the region as well as distance learning online programs.  CPCC is considered the best workforce development supporter in the region, supporting residents and the community at large through credit and noncredit programs.

Academics
Central Piedmont Community College offers a large number of programs that result in either a certificate, diploma or associate degree. Some programs are designed to prepare students for a career in their area of study by providing practical experience, skills and knowledge necessary to successfully and professionally perform tasks and duties required at the entry level. Graduates of these programs are able to immediately seek employment. Academic transfer programs allow students to complete the first two years of a four year education, the completion of which facilitates transfer to a four year institution to complete their bachelor's degree. Non-credit courses and programs are available for individuals seeking personal interests, or those who wish to return to school to complete missing portions of their education.

Programs offered include:


Admissions and Financial Aid
Students interested in enrollment at Central Piedmont Community College are asked to contact an admissions advisor to begin the application process. As an open enrollment institution, the requirements for admission are minimal, and if met, typically guarantee admission. Students should provide all pertinent transcripts and test scores, as well as any other documentation the school may request. Once accepted, students will partake in orientation prior to registration.

Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, and scholarships. Students applying for aid must first obtain a federal PIN number, followed by submitting a completed Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) which will be used to determine need, eligibility and awards. Students may also apply for scholarships from external sources, which typically require separate applications and are awarded for a variety of reasons.

Clubs and Organizations
Clubs and organizations provide students with a variety of social options to serve their interests. Some clubs follow academic and vocational specialization, assisting one another in skill development and focusing on a particular area of study. Some clubs participate in competitions, either academic, athletic or other, and invite students to participate by joining and either assisting competitors or becoming one. Other clubs focus on a particular interest or group of interests. Such clubs often attract likeminded individuals for the purposes of discussion and shared common interests, often almost entirely for social reasons.

Central Piedmont Community College offers assistance to clubs that formally form within the school, providing space and limited funding for operations. Students may petition the school for the formation of a new club if one does not exist that reflects their interests. Clubs and organizations update their information through the student life calendar, available on campus or online. The school promotes membership in clubs and organizations as it helps students socialize and bond, often extending relationships well past graduation.

Clubs and organizations at Central Piedmont Community College include:

  • American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS)
  • Clay Bodies
  • Culinary Club
  • Horticulture Club
  • Black & Tans
  • Anime Club
  • Spectrum Club

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

What Do Cytotechnologists Do?

The study of cytotechnology is the microscopic study of cells to determine if there is evidence of disease, viral infections, cancer, and/or bacterial infections. A generation ago, the field for cytotechnologists was strictly associated with the evaluation of cells from the uterine cervix commonly known as a Pap test. Today the term is used to assess and identify diseases cells from all parts of the body. Careful examination of aspirated or scraped cells can help doctors identify an array of infectious diseases, precancerous cells, and malignant conditions.

As technology continues to evolve healthcare, professionals in the field are provided new opportunities for testing and screening patients. In fact, the arena of molecular diagnostics is a burgeoning field that continues to yield effective results for identifying and treating a variety of cell-based diseases.

Top Degrees in Cytotechnology

In an effort to make your research more efficient, we have summarized the most popular degrees in the field below.  The summary will help you understand what is involved in each degree type and quickly connect with accredited schools to gather pertinent information as you work towards a decision on schooling.  Simply connect with any number of schools found on this resource page and match offerings up with your personal priority list before making a final decision.

Bachelor Degrees in Cytotechnology

According to a survey performed by the U.S. Department of Labor, approximately 38% of professionals in the field of cytotechnology hold a bachelor’s degree.  A bachelor’s degree in cytotechnology is popular degree option that provides students with foundational knowledge and upper-level courses requisite to enter the field.  The overwhelming majority of bachelor degree programs are 4-year degrees blending liberal arts education with core curricula.  That being said, there are a number of schools for cytotechnologists that offer 1-year and 2-year bachelor degrees.

Given the span of degree offerings, it is challenging to summarize a single set of core curriculum.  However, classes you may find in a cytotechnologist program include:

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Analysis
  • Functional Histology
  • Immunology
  • Cytopathology
  • Surgical and Cytology Pathology
  • Flow Cytometry
  • Cell and Molecular Diagnostics
Master Degrees in Cytotechnology

Master’s degrees for cytotechnologists are conferred as a Master of Science (MS).  Traditional master degree programs last 1-2 years for full time students with part time students taking longer to complete.  Several accredited colleges offering degrees for cytotechnologists offer the following variations on the traditional MS program including:

  • A 3+2 Master’s Degree
  • Joint Bachelor/Master Degree
  • Accelerated Master’s Degree
  • Professional Master’s Degree
  • Advanced Master’s Degree for Part-Time Students
  • Advanced Master’s Degree for Full-Time Students

Options will vary from school to school along with the course work for each graduate program.  Collect information from a variety of programs that fit your career goals and academic objectives before applying.

Educational Requirements for Cytotechnologists

In terms of educational requirements, Cytotechnology degree holders will have typically studied the following courses while in college:

Schools Other Students Requested Information From:

Employment Information & Cytotech Specializations

For students that earn a college degree in Cytotechnology, there are several fields of specialization that one can pursue.  The options range from high school teacher, post-secondary teacher, researcher, genomics, immunologist, toxicologist, virologist, biologist, biological technician, biomedical engineer, microbiologist, medical scientist, epidemiologist, food scientist, surgeon, and nutritional scientist to name a few possible career tracks.

Where Do Cytotechnologists Work?

Cytotechs can be found in a number of work environments including densely populated cities to rural towns around the country.  The most popular places for cytotechs to work include hospitals, research laboratories, colleges & universities, and clinics.  With additional schooling and/or work experience, may professionals work their way into administrative roles and supervisory roles.  This career track will blend technical knowledge with leadership skills to continue to advance the field of study.

Job Growth & Salary Outlook for Cytotechnologists

The job growth in the greater Cytotechnology domain are well above average.  Projected growth rates for the coming decade are estimated at 14% which is more than twice the national average for all vocations.  Employment growth of this nature is expected to create 62,500 job opening for the coming reporting period.   The median annual income for cytotechnologists is $61,070 based on the most current data from the U.S. DOL.  Given the broad nature of the Cytotechnology degree, compensation after graduation can vary greatly from career field to career field given prior experience and geographic location.  Related fields include teaching, research, genomics, immunology, radiobiology, neuroanatomy, pharmacology, botany, medical scientist, surgeon, and microbiology.

Professional Associations for Cytotechnologist

National associations and organizations such as the following are designed to help cytotechs from coast to coast.  Members gain access to resources, research, tools, and other professionals to help advance the body of knowledge in the field.  It may be worth the investment of time and money to research the following associations to learn more today.

Featured Rankings

Find Your College Match

Sort By
PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com