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Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology are exciting fields of study that is rapidly growing around the globe.  Medical Microbiology is a field of study within medical science focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases.

Medical Microbiology specialists understand there are four different types of microorganisms that lead to infectious disease that include: 1) viruses, 2) parasites, 3) bacteria, and 4) fungi.  From academics to practicum, medical microbiologists study pathogen growth, mechanisms of infection, and transmission mode(s).

Bacteriology is a defined subset of microbiology whereby specialists study, identify, classify, and characterize bacteria.  A bacteriologist who studies bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa have crept into the world of microbiology and blurred the known definition of bacteriology.

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$76,850

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

51.77%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

21,670

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology Degree

Harvard University is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. One of the top "Ivy League" universities, Harvard's reputation was built on its liberal arts curriculum, particularly at the undergraduate level, and has always boasted an acclaimed faculty of scholars in the liberal arts. It continues to offer excellent undergraduate programs, with 44 fields of study offered at the bachelor's degree level. Over the years, Harvard also has gained a reputation for its excellent graduate programs and professional schools.

Most departments offer a tutorial style of teaching and learning, with a good teacher to student ratio. Tutorials, which are taught individually or in small groups, are directed courses of study in a field of concentration.

Harvard University offers excellent facilities, including the largest university library in the world, many museums, and more than 20 scientific and laboratory centers.

The "prominent alumni" list for Harvard reads like a "Who's Who" of iconic figures from American and international societies, culture, politics, and nearly every field or industry over more than 100 years. The alumni list boasts 44 Nobel laureates, among other luminaries. From President John F. Kennedy to President Barack Obama, and composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein to cellist Yo Yo Ma, and author and activist Helen Keller to author-historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and diplomat Henry Kissinger, among others, the list is an impressive one.

History

The university's name came from its first donor, minister John Harvard of Charlestown. He died in 1638, leaving his library and half his estate to the institution of higher education that was established in 1636.

The history of Harvard University is a storied one. Those who wish to learn more about its history can visit the Harvard University Archives.

Academics

The academic calendar of Harvard University follows the semester format, with fall and spring "terms," and summer "school" (or session).

Colleges and Schools

  • Harvard Business School
  • Harvard College
  • Harvard University Division of Continuing Education
  • Harvard School of Dental Medicine
  • Graduate School of Design
  • Harvard Divinity School
  • Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • Harvard Law School
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Harvard School of Public Health
  • Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

Student Life

Students at Harvard University have many student services available, and many activities and living options to choose from. Residential housing is offered, providing a small college atmosphere at the university. Each of the 12 residential "houses" is well staffed, and offers dormitories and dining halls, as well as libraries, social events and intramural athletic teams.  Off campus housing is also available.

There are nearly 200 student-run organizations, groups, clubs and programs on Harvard's campus. There are close to 100 plays or musical performances offered by students each year. Two student newspapers offer plenty of opportunity for involvement, in addition to the many journals that are also produced at the university. Community service is encouraged through two programs: the Phillips Brooks House Association and the House and Neighborhood Development (HAND) program.  Mentorship is strong at Harvard, and students living on or off campus have faculty mentors available to them through various programs.

The facilities available to Harvard students are among the best at any university in the world. There are nearly 14 million volumes in the Harvard library system, and roughly 100 collections. More than 20 buildings are dedicated to scientific research in the areas of astronomy, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology and physics.  The university has many museums on campus, housing renowned art collections.  Its natural history museum is also well known.

Traditions

In 1875, Crimson was chosen as both the school color for Harvard, and its nickname for athletics teams. The school chose white for its second school color the same year.

In 1884, Harvard athletes began the tradition of waving a little red flag during any game they play against Yale.

Athletics

"The Crimson" athletics teams of Harvard compete in numerous intercollegiate sports, and have won championships in many. The sports that Crimson athletes compete in include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Heavyweight Crew
  • Lightweight Crew
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Heavyweight Crew
  • Lightweight Crew
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

Although there is only one campus for Harvard University, its many buildings, divisions and schools are spread throughout Cambridge. Harvard's campus facilities are located on both sides of the Charles River in Cambridge.  The Harvard Yard, (or "The Yard") is at the center of the campus and is the hub of Harvard's campus activities.

Community Life

The charms of Cambridge, Boston and New England as a whole, are many. Cambridge offers the ambiance of a small town in New England with its town greens, grassy riverbanks along the Charles River and charming town squares offering wonderful restaurants, unique shops, sidewalk cafes, and more.

Boston is a cosmopolitan city vibrant with history and culture.  Cobbled streets and church spires of colonial times are juxtaposed against modern architecture and high rises, offering a diversity that most visitors find stimulating. Concerts and live performances in theatre and classical music, museums and galleries, out door recreation and a world-renowned waterfront offer many opportunities for activities and entertainment. Students and visitors alike will enjoy the many areas that are within easy distance of Harvard.

Acceptance Rate

4.64

Student to Faculty Ratio

7:1

About Yale University, located in Hartford, Connecticut, was founded 1701 through “An Act for Liberty to Erect a Collegiate School” which was passed by the then Colony of Connecticut to establish a means to train ministers and leaders. The school was first brought together by ten Harvard University alumni led by James Pierpont, who pooled their books in order to establish the schools library and later became known as “The Founders.”

A rift in the clergy cause former members of Harvard University, particularly its sixth president, Increase Mathers, to promote the Collegiate School (Yale University's original name) in maintaining Puritan standards. As a result the school began to receive funding for construction and expansion, particularly from businessman from Elihu Yale, after whom the school is named.

Yale University is the third oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and is considered among the best universities in the nation. Yale is one of the schools that comprise the Ivy League, a term originally given to refer to the athletic conference but has come to describe a highly ranked and revered colleges and universities.
Academics Yale University offers a comprehensive undergraduate program that allows students to pursue a major area of study through the completion of general education courses along side electives and lower and upper division courses related to one's major.

Additionally, the school offers dual bachelor or minor degree programs that allow students to pursue a secondary area of study through the completion of additional courses outline by the program. The school also offers a variety of graduate programs, reaching the doctorate level, each of which has its own admissions guidelines and standards.
Programs offered include:

Admissions and Financial Aid Individuals applying to Yale University must submit a completed application and provide all the documentation requested, including transcripts and SAT or ACT scores. The school has a tradition of accepting academically or uniquely impressive candidates, and as such competition for available positions is very high. Individuals applying will also be interviewed, and once all materials are submitted a decision will be made. Notification will be sent out shortly thereafter, with successful applicants receiving additional information for preparation of their entry.
Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, work study programs and scholarships. Individuals in need of financial assistance must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the information from which will be used by the school to determine aid eligibility and which programs are available. Additionally, the school maintains private scholarships given to exceptional students to cover tuition costs, as well is supported by a number of other scholarships students may apply for and which are awarded for a variety of reasons. Aid must be applied for every academic year and should be submitted in a timely fashion.

Acceptance Rate

6.08

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

Columbia University in the City of New York is a private research university in Manhattan, New York. Columbia University is the fifth oldest institute of higher learning in the U.S., founded before the American Revolution, and is an "Ivy League" university. A member of the Association of American Universities, Columbia University was the first school in the U.S. to confer an M.D. degree. It was also the first site in the United States where the uranium atom was split. Other "firsts" that came out of Columbia include the birth of FM radio, the laser beam, the first use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), among many more pioneering inventions and patents.

Columbia offers degrees at the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels, as well as professional degrees, in a comprehensive range of academic fields. It is ranked number one as a research university by the Center for Measuring University Performance. It shares first place in rankings with MIT and Stanford University. Columbia University receives fourth ranking overall among other universities in the nation, according to the U.S. News & World Report.

Columbia University has a particularly illustrious list of alumni, boasting more Nobel Laureates than any other educational institution in the world. Since 1901, when the Nobel Prizes were first granted, 79 Columbia University alumni, faculty, researchers and administrators have won the Nobel Prize. The first recipient was Theodore Roosevelt in 1901 (Peace), and the most recent was President Barack Obama in 2009 (Peace).

There are renowned Columbia alumni in nearly every career field, including nine Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, 29 Heads of State, 25 Academy Award winners, more than 100 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Award winners, at least 30 MacArthur Foundation Award winners, more than 40 National Academy of Sciences Award winners, and many more.

History

Columbia University in the City of New York was founded in 1754 by royal charter of England's King George II. It was founded as "King's College." It closed during the American Revolution, and reopened after the war in 1784 as "Columbia College." In 1857, Columbia College moved from its original location at Park Place, to 49th Street and Madison Avenue. It remained in this location for more than 40 years. In 1897, the school moved to its present location in Morningside Heights in Manhattan. Architect Charles Follen McKim designed the buildings at the new Morningside Heights Campus in a Roman classical or Athenian style. Many newer buildings now surround the original buildings on campus.

Academics

The academic calendar for Columbia University in the City of New York follows the semester format, with fall and spring "terms." There is also a Summer Study Abroad program in various locations, as well as several "Special Programs" abroad. The academic schedules for these programs vary, and further information should be obtained from the program administrators.

Colleges and Schools

Undergraduate students at Columbia University attend Columbia College (Liberal Arts degrees), The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Engineering and Applied Sciences degrees), or The School of General Studies (nontraditional Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees) on the Morningside Heights campus. Undergraduates will also have access to affiliated institutions such as Teachers College, Barnard College, the Union Theological Seminary, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, as well as the Julliard School.

The colleges and schools of Columbia University in the City of New York include:

  • Columbia College
  • School of General Studies
  • School of the Arts
  • School of Continuing Education
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • School of International and Public Affairs
  • Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
  • School of Social Work
  • Graduate School of Journalism
  • School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • School of Law
  • Graduate School of Business
  • College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Public Health
  • College of Dental Medicine

Student Life

There are numerous student groups and organizations at Columbia University in the City of New York, including the many fraternities and sororities that are active on campus. There are also many co-educational Greek organizations available. Greek Life has been active on the Columbia campus sine 1836. 

In addition to various academic, social, political, religious and military student organizations, there is a campus organization representing and supporting lesbian, gay and transgender students.

Community Impact (CI) is a non-profit community service organization on campus that involves Columbia students in assisting the disadvantaged communities of Morningside Heights, Washington Heights and Harlem.

On-campus housing is available, guaranteed for enrolled undergraduates. Residence halls are located at Columbia College, Hartley Hall, Wallach Hall, Livingston Hall, John Jay Hall, Furnald Hall and Carman Hall. Apartment-style housing is available in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Students at Columbia can enjoy some of the many performances from campus groups including the Columbia Players, King's Crown Shakespeare Troupe, Columbia Musical Theater Society, Black Theatre Ensemble, and the Columbia University Marching Band, among others.

Traditions

The Columbia University school colors are blue and white. The blue is a light blue commonly known as "Columbia Blue."

The school mascot is the lion.

An old tradition at Columbia University is "Orgo Night," a custom that involves the Columbia University Marching Band playing music around campus for 45 minutes, beginning at the stroke of midnight, on the eve of final exams to distract students from studying for their Organic Chemistry final exam.

Another old tradition, which began prior to the American Revolution, is the lighting of the Yule Log. A troop of "soldiers" dressed as the Continental Army, carry the Yule Log from the campus Sun Dial to John Jay Hall, where it is lit as people sing Christmas carols and read aloud from traditional Christmas books.

Athletics

The Columbia University "Lions" athletic teams compete in 29 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Morningside Heights Campus in Manhattan (New York, New York) is the primary campus for most graduate and undergraduate studies. This campus occupies more than six city blocks. The campus will soon expand into "Manhattanville," a neighborhood north of its current location. This new expansion will extend the Columbia campus into West Harlem, with new buildings housing programs for business, arts, and some of the sciences.

Columbia University Medical Center Campus is considered its second campus, and houses all of the health-related schools for the University. The Medical Center Campus is located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, 50 blocks north of the Morningside Campus. There are many hospitals nationwide and abroad associated with Columbia University's medical-health schools, and in New York these are New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York State Psychiatric Institute, the Payne-Whitney Clinic, and the Payne Whitney Westchester, among others.

A third campus for Columbia University is its Lamont-Doherty Campus, located in Palisades, New York, on the west bank of the Hudson River. This campus supports geologic and oceanic research, including seismic activity.

A fourth campus in Irvington, New York, supports the Nevis Laboratories.

There are additional Columbia University facilities throughout New York, and a satellite learning site in Paris, France, among others.

Community Life

New York City is a world-famous metropolis with many historic landmarks and sites, made up of many communities. Students attending any of the Columbia University campuses in the New York area will have easy access to all that the "Big Apple" has to offer, thanks to an excellent transport system.

Acceptance Rate

5.45

Student to Faculty Ratio

6:1

GU is a nonprofit private university that has a large selection of degrees available for students to choose from. The school is located in Washington, District Of Columbia, in a predominantly urban area. The school maintains a Roman Catholic affiliation, which is evident in the role it plays in program curriculums and daily life at the school. Enrollment at GU is nearly seventeen thousand yearly.

Students can select from several areas of study, including but not limited to:

  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Social Sciences
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences

The admissions process starts with the submission of an application, school records, and test scores, which are then reviewed by admissions officials. The majority of students admitted to Georgetown University achieve an SAT score within the range of 1290 - 1500, or an ACT composite score in a range of 30 - 33. Only 20% of applicants are accepted to the school due to the huge number of applicants and the intense competition for the limited enrollment spots. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

Tuition is approximately $46,000 for the year, though it may vary based on any number of circumstances. Students should check the school's net price calculator to determine cost. Housing may be available for those that want to live on-campus for a cost of $9,800 for the year. GU may provide financial aid for students who are eligible in the form of scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for Georgetown University is the "Hoyas", and they participate in intercollegiate sports through oversight by the NCAA. Athletic programs offered may include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AA)

Contact information, financial aid information, areas of study offered, and more may be viewed on school's website at http://www.georgetown.edu.

Acceptance Rate

14.36

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

Cornell University is one of the top, public research universities in the United States. Located in Ithaca, New York, Cornell is the State's Land Grant University. As such, it is dedicated to transferring and applying university-based knowledge for practical benefits and economic prosperity in the State.

Research at Cornell is cutting-edge, with research programs being highly interdisciplinary. The academic excellence of Cornell's programs is widely known, as is its renowned faculty. The Cornell programs receiving the highest reviews include its Social Sciences, Life Sciences, Humanities, Sustainability, Law and Technology, Information Science, International Programs and Weill Cornell Initiatives.

Cross college collaborations are the norm at Cornell, encouraging and enabling explorations into new areas that include genomics, advanced materials and nanoscience. There are countless options for majors and minors at Cornell, and students can pursue a course of study that marries diverse interests.

The Liberal Arts at Cornell are as vital as the sciences, with top programs in literature, art history, theatre, dance and music.

History

Cornell University was founded in 1865 as New York State's Land Grant institution. Two founders, Ezra Cornell and Andrew D. White, wanted to establish an institution that married scientific and technical education with instruction in history and literature. Cornell University opened in 1867 with Andrew White as its first president. The goal then, to be the best at whatever it undertakes, continues today.

Academics

The general academic calendar for Cornell University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. There is a 3-week Winter Session in January, and the summer semester is divided into three short sessions.

Colleges and Schools

Cornell University has seven undergraduate colleges in addition to its graduate school and professional schools. There are also specialized faculty units at Cornell, and nearly 100 academic departments offering a variety of programs. Academic units at Cornell include many centers, institutes and laboratories as well, and interdisciplinary programs, research and study units that help make Cornell distinctive.

Undergraduate Colleges:

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
  • College of Architecture, Art and Planning
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Engineering
  • School of Hotel Administration
  • College of Human Ecology
  • School of Industrial and Labor Relations 

Special Faculty Units:

  • The Faculty of Computing and Information Science 

Graduate and Professional Colleges and Schools:

  • Graduate School
  • Cornell Law School
  • S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management
  • Weill Cornell Medical College (New York City and Doha, Qatar)
  • Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York City)
  • College of Veterinary Medicine 

School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions

Student Life

There are more than 500 student clubs and organizations at Cornell University, covering myriad interests for its diverse student body. For students interested in engaging in public service and social action, there are many opportunities available through the Cornell Public Service Center (PSC). Local chapters of sororities and fraternities are very active, offering additional opportunities for academic success, community involvement and networking.

Cornell offers a range of options for on campus living, from undergraduate and graduate housing on campus to residential initiatives and community centers.  Faculty leadership is part of the residential initiatives, enhancing the first-year residential experience. There are themed living communities that offer students the chance to live in a place where they can learn more about their interests, such as music, languages, cultures and more.

On campus dining offers a wide range of choices from dining halls to cafes, and off campus eateries in Ithaca offer a diverse range of options.

Traditions

The traditional colors for Cornell University are red and white. These colors were established in 1868 on the banner used for decoration at celebrations for the University's Inauguration Day.  The football team has been nicknamed "Big Red" since the early days.

In 1898, the general manager for the Campbell Soup Company attended a Cornell University football game. He was so impressed with the red and white uniforms worn by the Cornell athletes that he insisted the design for Campbell's Soup labels be changed to red and white. The soup cans have had the iconic red and white labels since that time.

The Cornell University mascot is a bear. A university student wears a bear costume and, as "Big Red," performs for the crowds at varsity athletic events.

Athletics

The Cornell University "Big Red" athletic teams compete in 36 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Polo
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Sprint Football
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Equestrian
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Gymnastics
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Polo
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

Cornell University has one primary campus in Ithaca, New York, but has medical schools in New York City and Qatar. It also offers the Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) programs in 62 counties of New York State, including all five NYC boroughs. The goal of CCE programs is to make the Cornell academic experience and research widely available to improve lives and communities. Programs include agriculture, environment, community development, nutrition and health, and more.

Community Life

Although Ithaca, New York is a college town and often associated with young people, recent news articles have touted Ithaca as the ideal town for retirees. The median home prices are relatively low and retired people can take classes at Cornell University or Ithaca College. There are many activities available for you and old alike, including speeches, concerts, and sports events, day hikes along scenic trails to waterfalls and gorges, and bicycle paths throughout the Finger Lakes region. The Museum of Earth is just one of the many interesting organizations that are available to the public in this idyllic university town full of culture and stimulation.

Acceptance Rate

10.85

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

University of Virginia, Charlottesville (U.Va.), is a public research university that was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. One of the original public "ivy colleges," it is considered to be among the top 25 best universities in the United States, and is ranked by U.S. News and World Report as the second best public university in the nation.

The University of Virginia is comprised of eleven schools at it Charlottesville location, in addition to its College at Wise in southwest Virginia. The university offers more than 50 bachelor's degrees, 84 master's degrees, six educational specialist degrees, 57 doctoral degrees, and two professional degrees (law and medicine). The University of Virginia Health System, located adjacent to the U.Va. Charlottesville campus, is considered a top medical center that provides training for medical care professionals and excellent patient care.

One of the goals for which Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia was to develop leaders and foster leadership through many areas of study. The illustrious alumni of the University of Virginia include many great leaders, such as President Woodrow Wilson; Senators Robert and Edward Kennedy, John Warner, Charles Robb, and George Allen, among others.  The U.Va. is known for producing a great number of Rhodes Scholars.

Jefferson was also a strong supporter of the arts, and the university has educated many leaders in drama and literature, including Mark Johnson (the movie producer of Rain Man and Good Morning, Vietnam), Henry Taylor (the 1986 Pulitzer Prize winner for poetry), and Edgar Allan Poe.  The U.Va. offers excellent programs in drama, music and visual arts, and the Department of Drama has modern facilities and two theatres, while the McIntire Department of Art has a well-known art gallery. The University of Virginia Art Museum exhibits a notable permanent collection as well as changing exhibits.

History

When Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia in 1819, his vision was to create a university that was publicly supported and dedicated to educating leaders in public service. Jefferson undertook the university project near the end of his life, and he was very involved in the planning of the curriculum, recruitment of the faculty, and the design of the buildings and campus.  One of the more noteworthy buildings Jefferson helped to design is the Rotunda, which stands at the north end of the Lawn.

The U.Va. opened its doors in 1825, with 68 students enrolled and a faculty of eight. The curriculum in 1825 included ancient and modern languages, mathematics, philosophy, chemistry, law and medicine.

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters. It also offers an accelerated January Term.

The Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Law, and the School of Medicine follow different academic calendars, and students should contact those schools for further information.

Colleges and Schools

  • School of Architecture
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy
  • Curry School of Education
  • Darden Graduate School of Business Administration
  • School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • McIntire School of Commerce
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • Basic Medical Sciences
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Continuing & Professional Studies

Student Life

There are hundreds of student clubs and organizations available for involvement at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Nearly every interest is represented, whether it is academic, political, professional, cultural, social, service-oriented, athletic, artistic, religious, or otherwise. The Greek Life on campus is very active, with many local chapters of fraternities and sororities, as well as inter-fraternity and inter-sorority councils, Multicultural Greek Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, and more.

On campus housing is available, including in "residential colleges," and there is a wide range of on campus dining to choose from. University Avenue is a hub of student life at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, with a collection of student shops, bookstores, restaurants, cafes and more. Newcomb Hall, the student union, has a selection of snack shops.

Traditions

The school colors for the University of Virginia are navy blue and orange, with white as an accent color. The mascot is the cavalier.

The University of Virginia has several traditions for which it is known, including the reference to the campus as "the Grounds." The students are referred to as "first year," "second year," "third year," and "fourth year," rather than as freshmen, sophomores, junior and seniors.

There is a tradition of "secret societies" at Virginia, which have operated for many decades and are noted for leaving their painted marks on the university buildings. Many of the societies perform good works and service activities, though their efforts are unpublicized.

Athletics

The Virginia "Cavaliers" athletic teams compete in 25 intercollegiate sports for men and women, and all sports at U.Va. are very highly ranked. The U.Va. is one of only 15 schools to finish in the top 30 in the Learfield Sports Directors Cup standings. Intercollegiate sports at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross County
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field

Satellite Campuses

The University of Virginia has its primary campus in Charlottesville, with a satellite campus at College at Wise in southwest Virginia. The University of Virginia Health System has its buildings and facilities adjacent to the primary U.Va. campus in Charlottesville.

Community Life

The city of Charlottesville was named for the wife of George III, Princess Charlotte, when it was settled in the 18th century. Today, this metropolitan city offers rich historical and cultural charm, and is considered one of the most desirable places to live in America.

The U.Va. campus itself is a big attraction for visitors, and a nearby attraction is Monticello, the home of the university's founder, Thomas Jefferson. Also nearby, are the homes of presidents James Monroe and James Madison. Other attractions in the area include the University of Virginia Art Museum, a city sculpture garden, and many local theater groups.

Many university and community ensembles and performance groups can be found in Charlottesville, including a chamber choir and orchestra, symphony orchestra, swing orchestra, wind ensemble, jazz ensemble, opera workshop, and various singing groups.

Acceptance Rate

23.94

Student to Faculty Ratio

15:1

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill or "Carolina") is just one of 16 public universities in North Carolina.  It is located in the charming college town of Chapel Hill.  One of the most highly regarded institutions of higher education in the United States, "Carolina" ranks high for its academic quality, affordability, diversity, social engagement and international presence.

Consistently ranking among the top five or six U.S. universities for the quality of its research programs, research faculty at "Carolina" consistently attract strong funding for their work. Faculty garnered more than $800 million in research contracts and grant funding in 2010.

Many undergraduate and graduate programs at UNC-Chapel Hill receive high marks. Receiving particularly high marks are the school's city and regional planning programs, MBA, healthcare management and nursing programs, and its School of Public Health, School of Medicine, School of Education and School of Law.  UNC-Chapel Hill is also noted for its excellent creative arts programs, producing many great visual artists, actors, dancers, musicians and writers over the years.

History

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered the same year that George Washington was inaugurated as president (1789), and first opened its doors to students in 1795.  It was the nation's first public university, and also the only one to award degrees in the 18th century.

Academics

The UNC-Chapel Hill's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and a summer session.

Colleges, Schools and Centers

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Dentistry
  • School of Education
  • Eshelman School of Pharmacy
  • Friday Center for Continuing Education
  • General College
  • Gillings School of Global Public Health
  • Graduate School
  • Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • School of Government
  • School of Information & Library Science
  • School of Journalism & Mass Communication
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Social Work
  • Summer School

Student Life

Students at Carolina can get involved in the more than 600 student groups, clubs and organizations available that focus on politics, the arts, public service, recreation, academics, research, and much more. The university magazine and online blog, Blue & White, is one of many ways for Carolina students to connect. There are also numerous journals and other media outlets available on campus to help students keep up with the news or become involved.  Many cultural events and performances are available on campus year round.  Campus recreation includes fitness classes, intramural sports and many adventure trips.

Campus housing is available, along with numerous on-campus dining options.  Student health services are available, as are academic services, and many other resources that are accessible via MyUNC.

Traditions

The mascot of Carolina's "Tar Heels" is the ram. The white ram's antlers are traditionally painted light blue to represent the university's colors of white and light blue.

Athletics

UNC-Chapel Hill's athletic program produces some of the top college athletes in the country, and the Carolina "Tar Heels" men and women's teams compete in 28 sports.

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fencing
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Community Life

Chapel Hill is situated in the rolling, wooded hills of North Carolina.  It is located three hours from the Blue Ridge Mountains and equidistance from the Atlantic coast.  Chapel Hill is one of three points in The Research Triangle, an area that is noteworthy for being a top location to live, do business and conduct scientific research. The other two "points" in the "triangle" are the cities of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina.  The area is considered by many publications to be one of the best places to live in America.

Acceptance Rate

22.63

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

The University of Florida is located in Gainsville, Florida and is one of the three largest single campus universities in the US.  It is one of three research flagship universities within the State University System of Florida and is the most prestigious school of higher learning in the state.

The University of Florida has a 2,000 acre campus and has been recognized as a "Public Ivy" facility. It has 150 research centers and institutes and is the home of 16 colleges.

History

The Buckman Act of 1905 consolidated all Florida colleges into three institutions that were segregated by race and sex. They were:

  • The Florida Female College for white women.
  • The University of the State of Florida for white men
  • The State Normal School for Coloured Students, which accommodated African American men and women

The State University System of Florida was reorganized by the Buckman Act and allowed the system to be governed by the Florida Board of Control, which chose Gainsville for the new campus. 102 students were welcomed there on September 26, 1906.

The name of the school was changed from the University of the State of Florida to the University of Florida in 1909. In 1911, the alligator was chosen as the school's mascot.

In 1924, the Florida Legislature mandated that women over the age of 21 years and who had completed 60 semester hours could enrol at the University of Florida in programs that weren't offered at the Florida State College for Women. Lucy Goodbread-Black enrolled at the College of Agriculture in 1925. She was the first woman to attend the University of Florida.

When WWII ended, many returning military men applied to the University of Florida under the GI Bill of Rights. The University couldn't meet the demand and the Tallahassee Branch was opened on the campus of the Florida State College for Women. 954 men had enrolled by 1947. To meet the demand the Florida State College for Women reverted to co-ed status and the name changed to Florida State University.

By 1958, a medical school and Shands Hospital had been founded and African American students were allowed to enrol. Campus expansion increased dramatically at this point and continues to do so.

Many of the buildings on the campus of the University of Florida have significant historical value. The Historic District covers about 650 acres and is comprised of 19 buildings, some of which are listed on the US National Register of Historic Places. Examples include:

  • Buckman Hall
  • Century Tower
  • Carlton Auditorium
  • Florida Gymnasium
  • Women's Gymnasium
  • Mallory Hall
  • Infirmary
  • The Hub
  • Plaza of the Americas

Academics

Students world-wide attend the University of Florida. Professional degree programs include but are not limited to:

  • Law
  • Dentistry
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacy
  • Veterinary Medicine

The University of Florida ranks 17th in the US for the largest international student body. It ranks 2nd in the US for bachelor degrees awarded to African Americans and 3rd for Hispanic students.

The application process for the University of Florida is very competitive. The freshmen retention rate is 94%. Students who wish to apply to the University's honors program must do so after being accepted to the University. Over 100 programs are offered in the honors program. Freshmen must have a SAT score of 2070 and a GPA of 4.0 minimum.

The University of Florida is comprised of 16 colleges and over 100 educational research and service centers. It offers 200 graduate degrees and more than 100 undergraduate majors. Examples of colleges include:

  • College of Nursing
  • College of Medicine
  • Levin College of Law
  • College of Fine Arts
  • College of Health and Human Performance
  • Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences

Student Life

At Reetz Student Union students will find the Career Resource Center, which provides services for alumni and students. These services assist in career experiences, employment opportunities and career development.

More than 15% of undergraduate students belong to a fraternity or sorority. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Alpha Gamma Ro
  • Delta Chi
  • Kappa Sigma
  • Sigma Chi
  • Theta Chi
  • Chi Omega
  • Kappa Delta
  • Delta Phi Epsilon
  • Phi Mu
  • Zeta Phi Beta

The Reserve Officer Training Corps was officially founded in 1905 and is the official training and commissioning program.

There is housing for 9200 students at the University of Florida. Privacy and cost vary.

Local Community

There is lots of green space on campus, including picnic areas, ponds, open space and a wildlife sanctuary that is comprised of 81-acres. The University owns Lake Alice and there are many recreational rivers and lakes in the area. Sports facilities are plentiful both indoors and out, including the Student Recreation and Fitness Center, Plaza of the Americas and the University Golf Course.

Besides these, there are a wide range of museums, attractions, festivals, events, hiking trails, swimming, canoeing and wildlife viewing. There are also dozens of hotspots for those who enjoy a night out on the town.

Acceptance Rate

36.58

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

University of California - Irvine (UCI) is an institution of higher learning and research, and one of the fastest-growing campuses in the University of California system.  It is situated in the heart of Orange County, in Southern California. Consistently ranked among the nation's top universities, UCI is known for its top-rated academic programs and professional schools. Some of UCI's newer programs include public health, pharmaceutical sciences, nursing science, and its School of Law.

UCI offers more than 80 academic majors and 63 minors for undergraduates. UCI offers more than 100 academic disciplines at the graduate degree levels, with 53 master's degree programs, and 45 doctoral programs. Professional degree programs include the M.D., Ed.D. and J.D. UCI provides graduate students with many opportunities to participate in research initiatives and interdisciplinary programs.

UCI is known as one of the top research universities in the world, thanks to a distinguished faculty of scholars and scientists. Included among the faculty are two Nobel laureates, two Medal of Science recipients, more than 20 National Academy of Science members, among others. UCI faculty are also acclaimed in the arts, literature and other disciplines, with three Pulitzer Prize winners, more than 50 Fulbright scholars, and nearly 40 Guggenheim Fellows, among others.

The Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UCI is the first in the UC System, and is one of the fastest-growing programs of its kind in the U.S.

UCI also offers an Extension program for continuing education focusing on professional and personal enrichment.

History

The Irvine Company contributed 1,000 acres of land for the University of California, Irvine campus in 1960. UCI officially opened in 1965 with eight buildings on its campus. Over the years, many renowned architects contributed to additional buildings at the UCI campus.

There were nearly 120 faculty members and just over 1,500 students enrolled on campus when the school opened.

Academics

The academic calendar of the University of California - Irvine follows the quarter format, with fall, winter, spring and summer quarters.

Colleges and Schools

The University of California - Irvine, refers to its departments, colleges, schools and programs as "Academic Units," which are:

  • Claire Trevor School of the Arts
  • School of Biological Sciences
  • The Paul Merage School of Business
  • Department of Education
  • The Henry Samueli School of Engineering
  • College of Health Sciences
  • School of Humanities
  • Donald Bren School of Information & Computer Sciences
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • Program in Nursing Science
  • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • School of Physical Sciences
  • Program in Public Health
  • School of Social Ecology
  • School of Social Sciences

 UCI also has numerous research centers and institutes.

Student Life

The Student Affairs Office at the University of California - Irvine offers a range of student services that are gathered in clusters: Auxiliary Services, Campus Recreation, Counseling Services, Health Services, Enrollment Services, Dean of Students and Student Housing.

The Anteater Recreation Center (ARC) offers a host of student activities and amenities, including fitness facilities, activity rooms, family/children's time, an aquatics plaza, a rock wall, roller rink, multiple intramural sports clubs, many social, academic and cultural clubs, cooking and nutrition classes, dance classes, yoga, swimming lessons, team building and leadership programs, and more.

On campus student housing is available, along with a range of dining services.

Traditions

The school colors are blue and gold, and the school mascot is the anteater. When the UCI was founded in 1965, students voted for their favorite mascot. The anteater won over the other possibilities that were promoted, including the unicorns, eagles, golden bears, and sea hawks, among others.

Athletics

UCI "Anteater" athletic teams have earned 26 national titles in nine sports. Anteaters have won more than 60 individual national titles. More than 40 "Anteater" athletes have competed in the Olympics.  The UCI Anteater athletics teams participate in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

 Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

UCI is located in the Irvine, California, which has been voted the "safest city in America" for several years running. The UCI campus offers all the best of California, including nearby beaches, mountains, deserts, and plenty of entertainment and culture.

UC Irvine is Orange County's largest employer, and has a significant economic impact on the area. The campus community of UC Irvine is founded on several core principles: respect, intellectual curiosity, integrity, commitment, empathy, appreciation, and fun.

UCI's faculty, students and staff contribute to the community through programs that address social issues. The UC Irvine Medical Center and UC Irvine Douglas Hospital offer cutting-edge medicine and the latest technologies to the area's citizens.

UCI engages the community through many public events and activities, including campus performances and speaking engagements that are open to the public. A recent headliner was the His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Acceptance Rate

26.54

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

University of California - Davis (UCD), located in the northern city of Davis, California, offers the largest variety of degree programs among the University of California campuses.  UC Davis's programs are nationally ranked, thanks in part to the universities award-winning faculty.  UC Davis offers more than 180 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and specializations.

The agricultural and environmental sciences programs are particularly strong at UC Davis, and since its inception, it has continued to have a reputation as a good "farming school."

History

UC Davis was conceived in 1905 when Governor George Pardee signed into law an act to establish a university-level farm school of agricultural instruction and research within the University of California system.  In 1908, the first students of the University Farm School arrived in what was then known as "Davisville."

Academics

The academic calendar of University of California, Davis follows the academic quarter format, with fall, winter and spring quarters.  Summer sessions are also offered, and evening classes are offered through UC Davis Extension.

Colleges and Schools

The colleges and professional schools of University of California, Davis offer more than 100 undergraduate degree programs and 80 graduate degree programs.

  • College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
  • College of Biological Sciences
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Letters and Science
  • The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing
  • Graduate School of Management
  • School of Education
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Veterinary Medicine

Student Life

There are many campus activities and resources available for UC Davis students including numerous clubs and organizations, more than one campus student union, the Graduate Student Association, the Cal Aggie Marching Band, music ensembles, dance and athletic groups, and more.  There is student housing, and university dining services include a coffee house and a café and pub. Student amenities include a variety of health services and academic support services.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are many chapters of fraternities and sororities available at UC Davis, and the Student Housing Greek Life Office offers support.  The mission of the Office of Greek Life is to foster a diverse and inclusive Greek community, empower students to develop leadership skills, and build strong relationships between Greek organizations and with the surrounding community.

Athletics

The UC Davis "Aggies" athletics teams compete in many intercollegiate sports including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Water Polo

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross County
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

The city of Davis, California offers a full community calendar of activities including "Scrabble at Picnic in the Park," "Spring Plant Sale at the UC Davis Arboretum," as well as art exhibits, musical and dance performances, and more.

Acceptance Rate

38.87

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

UM's pride lies not only in being Maryland state's flagship university but also in having over a hundred of its academic programs consistently ranking among the best in the country. The University of Maryland boasts of several schools and colleges including those of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism, the Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the A. James Clark School of Engineering. Both summer and winter short-term programs include opportunities to study in numerous locations abroad, some of which are either partly or fully-sponsored.

The College Park Scholars and Women in Engineering (WIE) are among the more notable programs being offered at the university. WIE was enacted to encourage support for and the growth of the number of female students in the field of engineering, both in the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Scholars program, on the other hand, invites qualified students to participate in what are called "living-learning programs", covering areas of study such us Global Public Health, Life Sciences, and Public Leadership.

Testudo, a representation of a Diamondback terrapin, stands as the official mascot and symbol of good luck that is present at different college athletic events. The school's landscape features the famous Memorial Chapel and its carillon, the McKeldin Mall sundial and fountain, and the bronze sculpture of alumni Jim Henson with his famous creation, Kermit.

Traditions on campus have been prevalent since its establishment as the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856. Maryland Day for instance, held on the last Saturday of April, marks an open-house event to which prospective students and members of the surrounding communities are invited in joining the university's staff, faculty, and student body in various festivities. UM is located, specifically, within Prince George's county near Washington, DC.

Acceptance Rate

44.18

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

George Washington University (GW) is located in the heart of Washington, D.C., a short distance from the White House. Students and faculty of GW have the opportunity to work on projects alongside leaders of politics, science, law and many other disciplines. Students also have the opportunity to intern on Capitol Hill, or attend national events and listen to world leaders speak. The commencement ceremonies for graduates are held on the National Mall.

The three major campuses of GW University are the Foggy Bottom Campus and Mount Vernon Campus in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Virginia. All the campuses offer excellent facilities, including a library system that houses more than two million volumes, and opportunities to attend professional sports events, headline entertainment, top art exhibits, and more. Off campus and distance learning is also available through online courses.

The GW alumni are internationally recognized, and include former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Arnold "Red" Auerbach, former coach of the Boston Celtics, actors Alec Baldwin and Kerry Washington, and more than 50 Fulbright scholars, among others.

GW University offers hundreds of options for academic majors and minors at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Students can choose their major and minor from among the following academic interest areas:

  • Business & Management
  • Engineering & Technology
  • Health, Medicine & Nursing
  • History & Government
  • International Studies
  • Literature & Language
  • Media, Journalism & Communication
  • Professional Studies
  • Religion & Philosophy
  • Science & Mathematics
  • Security and Public Safety
  • Social & Human Behavior
  • Visual & Performing Arts

History

The George Washington University was founded in 1821 as "Columbian College" through an Act of Congress. It was established in response to George Washington's vision of an institution in the nation's capital that would educate and prepare its future leaders. Washington died before his vision was realized, but President James Monroe and others were committed to carrying out the venture. The university opened with three faculty members and 30 students enrolled.

Now the largest university in the District of Columbia, GW is comprised of three campuses: Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. GW also has several graduate education centers in the D.C. area.

Academics

The academic calendar for the George Washington University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and multiple shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Law School
  • School of Engineering & Applied Science
  • Graduate School of Education & Human Development
  • School of Business
  • Elliott School of International Affairs
  • School of Public Health & Health Services
  • College of Professional Studies
  • School of Nursing

Student Life

There are more than 300 student clubs, groups and organizations for GW University students to get involved in. Student engagement at GW is high, and when students aren't participating in some of the many community service or leadership events or hands-on learning labs or partnerships available through local organizations, there is plenty to do to engage students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds. GW offers a world-class library, state-of-the-art facilities, and a full range of sports, arts and entertainment.

The Washington, D.C., region offers many cultural and outdoor activities as well. The campuses are all well situated in interesting neighborhoods, with easy access to all the metro area has to offer.

Traditions

There are many rich traditions at the GW University, many of them tied to the school's namesake, President George Washington.

The school colors are Blue and Buff (pale gold), and the GW fight song makes reference to these colors:

Hail to the Buff,
Hail to the Blue,
Hail to the Buff and Blue!
All our lives we'll be proud to say,
We hail from GW! (Go Big Blue!)
Oh, by George, we're happy we can say,
We're GW, here to show the way, so
Raise high the Buff!
Raise high the Blue!
Loyal to GW
You bet we're
Loyal to GW!
Fight!

Athletics

The George Washington University "Colonials" athletic teams compete in 22 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

The GW University has three major campuses: the Foggy Bottom Campus in the "Foggy Bottom neighborhood in the heart of Washington, D.C.; the Mount Vernon Campus in the wooded "Foxhall" neighborhood on the former site of Mount Vernon College; and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia - an area known for its focus on technology research.  Each campus has a distinct ambiance with integrated services and amenities.

In addition to its three major campuses, GW has education facilities throughout the region of Washington, D.C., that serve as centers for graduate professional studies programs.

Community Life

Students at all three main GW campuses enjoy great neighborhoods. The Foggy Bottom Campus is located in 18 city blocks of the "Foggy Bottom" neighborhood, known for its low-rise brick and brownstone buildings and streets lined with trees.

Students on the Mount Vernon Campus will enjoy a quieter setting on 23 acres within a wooded residential area.

Students at GW are very likely to be involved in community activities and service, contributing to hundreds of organizations from non-profits to politics. Students in the GW athletics department are active volunteers of community organizations, including motivational presentations to local high school groups, clean-up activities at local parks and facilities, assisting local youth sports, and more.

Acceptance Rate

40.84

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Stony Brook University is a public research university with its primary campus located on Long Island's North Shore in New York. Stony Brook University also comprises the Stony Brook University Medical Center, Health Sciences Center, Long Island State Veterans Home, the Stony Brook Manhattan campus, Stony Brook Southampton campus on Long Island's East End, a Research and Development Park and several business incubators.  Additionally, Stony Brook University co-manages the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

A National Merit Institution, Stony Brook University ranks in the "top 100 best national universities" according to U.S. News and World Report. Stony Brook is a recipient of the National Science Foundation's recognition award for its integration of research and education. Students at Stony Brook have access to the cutting-edge facilities of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The school's undergraduate research and creative projects get very high marks.

Stony Brook has 70 academic departments, and offers more than 65 undergraduate majors and 75 minors. It also offers more than 100 master's programs, 40 doctoral programs and more than 30 graduate certificate programs.

The Stony Brook faculty and alumni are highly acclaimed, and include more than 80 Guggenheim Fellows, more than 50 Fulbright Fellows, numerous Sloan Foundation Fellows, as well as several Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners, among others. Stony Brook Faculty members have been instrumental in creating more than 1,500 inventions and 450 patents.

History

Stony Brook University was founded in 1957 as a teacher preparation college that focused on mathematics and sciences. The original campus was in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Philanthropist Ward Melville donated land near the village of Stony Brook, and the university moved to a new campus there in 1962. Now part of the State of University of New York system, the school has developed and grown significantly, realizing its goal to become one of the finest institutions of higher learning in the U.S.

The Stony Brook campus was host to many big-name musical performers during the rock and roll movement of the 1960s.

Academics

The academic calendar for Stony Brook University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters and flexible summer sessions. There is also an accelerated winter session that allows students to earn three credits in three weeks.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Business
  • College of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • The Graduate School
  • Honors College
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • School of Health Technology and Management
  • School of Journalism
  • School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Professional Development
  • School of Social Welfare

Centers of Excellence

  • The Centers for Molecular Medicine and Biology Learning Laboratories
  • The Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics
  • The Center for Teaching Learning and Technology
  • The Charles B. Wang Center
  • The Humanities Institute at Stony Brook
  • The Marine Sciences Research Center
  • Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center
  • The Simons Center for Geometry and Physics
  • Staller Center for the Arts

Student Life

There are more than 250 student clubs and organization at Stony Brook University, and the Division of Student Life fosters campus involvement and civic engagement. The many programs, activities and groups available provide academic, social, recreational, cultural and leadership development. There are more than 30 fraternities and sororities available at Stony Brook.

Student services at Stony Brook include child-care, commute services, disability support, an interfaith center, ombudsman's office, veteran affairs, and more.

Campus housing is available, with more than 30 residence halls and apartment-style buildings. A wide range of dining options is available, as well as on-campus fitness and recreation.

Traditions

The school color for Stony Brook University is red. After many different mascots through the years, in the early 1990s, the school's mascot became the sea wolf - a mythical sea creature said to bring good luck to all who might see it. Since 1994, the varsity teams have been known as the Stony Brook Seawolves. "Wolfie" is the fuzzy and friendly mascot who promotes the Seawolves at most Stony Brook athletics events.

Athletics

The Stony Brook "Seawolves" athletic teams compete in 20 intercollegiate men and women's sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its Main Campus in the village of Stony Brook, the university has satellite campuses at:

  • Stony Brook Southampton
  • Stony Brook Manhattan

Community Life

The primary campus for Stony Brook University is located in the village of Stony Brook, New York. This residential community is 65 miles east of New York City with proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and the Long Island Sound. It is easy to reach by car, rail, ferry or air.

Set among more than 1,000 acres of woodland, the Main Campus at Stony Brook is very scenic and includes a nature preserve. It offers a six-mile bike path that encircles the campus. Nearby harbors of the North Shore of Long Island are easily accessible by bicycle. 

There are plenty of arts, culture and entertainment in this charming area, including the Stony Brook Film Festival, many theatrical, musical and dance performances, a university art gallery, craft center, and more.

Acceptance Rate

44.15

Student to Faculty Ratio

18:1

University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh Campus (Pitt) is situated on a 132-acre area located in the city of Pittsburgh's Oakland neighborhood. Pitt has hundreds of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a variety of disciplines at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels.  It also offers professional degrees. Pitt is ranks as one of the top educational institutions in the nation for its academic and research programs.

The university also offers online learning options through "Pitt Online." Students can earn a degree or certificate from Pitt's School of Education Online, School of Nursing Online, University Center for Social & Urban Research Online, and the Katz Graduate School of Business Online.

History

The University of Pittsburgh was founded in 1787 as "the Pittsburgh Academy," a private school situated in a log cabin near the city's three rivers. The University of Pittsburgh became a state university in 1966.

The University of Pittsburgh, or "Pitt", has had many "firsts" throughout its history.  In 1893, William Hunter Dammond became the first African American to graduate from the University of Pittsburgh when he completed his degree in civil engineering.  Dammond went on to become a notable engineer, professor, inventor and contributor to the railroad industry.

In 1898, the first two women students ever admitted to Pitt graduated with bachelor's degrees.  They were sisters Margaret and Stella Stein, and graduated first in their class.

In 1975, Pitt embarked on its first sustainable design and construction project by installing its first campus-wide energy management system. The latest "green" designs are being implemented in Pitt's newest buildings, and the university's Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation focuses on designing sustainable neighborhoods.

In 1984, Pitt surgeons performed the first double transplant operation in the world.  The surgeons were Thomas Starzl and Henry Bahnson.

Academics

The academic calendar of the University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh Campus follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer "terms."  In the summer there are three shorter terms to choose from: 4-week, 6-week, and 12-week.

Colleges, Schools and Centers

The University of Pittsburgh has 15 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools.

Schools and Colleges:

  • Arts and Sciences
  • Business
  • Dental Medicine
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • General Studies
  • Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
  • Honors College
  • Information Sciences
  • Law
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacy
  • Public and International Affairs
  • Public Health
  • Social Work

University Centers:

  • International Studies (UCIS)
  • Learning Research and Development (LRDC)
  • Philosophy of Science

Student Life

The University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh Campus offers both on and off-campus housing.  There are also many different dining options and services on campus.

The Student Organization Resource Center (SORC) lists more than 400 student organizations and clubs available on Pitt's campus. SORC is also a resource for the many student services available to Pitt students.  One of the many activities that Pitt students can get involved in is the annual "Pitt Make a Difference Day," which offers students a chance to participate in hundreds of community service projects throughout the Pittsburgh area.

There are other volunteer opportunities available, as well as leadership and government groups to get involved in. The "Greek Life" is thriving at Pitt, with more than 39 active fraternities and sororities available.

Athletics

The Pittsburgh "Panthers" athletics teams compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its Pittsburgh campus, the University of Pittsburgh has regional campuses in Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, and Titusville.

Community Life

Pitt considers the city its campus, though its large campus is a virtual city unto itself. The city's industrial past is apparent in its resourceful and vibrant culture, with many distinctive neighborhoods and affordable living options. Pittsburgh has many entertainment and cultural venues for recreation and leisure activities.  There is a world-class symphony, notable art, classic architecture, dance and musical performances, excellent restaurants and a busy nightlife.

Acceptance Rate

56.65

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities is located in St. Paul/Minneapolis and is a public research facility.

History

Though the University of Minnesota was founded on February 25, 1851, no students were welcomed within its halls until 1867. Enrolment was detained because of the American Civil War, as well as financial challenges. However, in 1867, John Sergent Pillbury, a University regent, state governor and senator, loaned the school a sizeable sum and used his political position to allow it to become the recipient of a Morrill Land Grant. The first president, William Watts Folwell was inaugurated on December 22, 1869. The First Bachelor Degree was awarded in 1873. In 1888, Doctor of Philosophy degrees were awarded.

The original Minneapolis campus was located on the Mississippi River, overlooking St. Anthony Falls. It was upgraded to a college from a preparatory school in 1869.

Minneapolis Campus

Today, the University's Minneapolis campus is located on both banks for the Mississippi River; the East Bank being the main campus. East Bank is divided into five areas. They are:

  • The Athletic Area
  • The Gateway Area
  • The Health Area
  • The Knoll Area
  • The Mall Area

The West Bank first saw major development during the 1960s. West Bank Art Center consists of:

  • The Barbara Barker Center for Dance
  • Ferguson Hall
  • Regis Center for Art
  • Ted Mann Concert Hall
  • Rarig Center

St. Paul Campus

The St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota Twin Cities is located in the Falcon Heights Suburb. Social Sciences and the College of Food are located here. The Washington Avenue Bridge over the Mississippi allows students easy access between the East and West Banks. Gopher way tunnels allow students access to some buildings during inclement weather. The University has its own law enforcement in and around campus for student safety.

Academics

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities is compromised of sixteen colleges and schools. Examples include:

  • College of Biological Sciences
  • College of Design
  • College of Food, Agriculture and National Resource Sciences
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Dentistry
  • Law School
  • College of Education and Human Development

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities ranks as second largest for higher education in the Midwest and offers degrees in a large variety of fields.

Athletics

The intercollegiate teams at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities are called the Golden Gophers. Goldy Gopher is the campus mascot. Teams include:

  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Wrestling

Student Life

There are a wide variety of academic, cultural, entertainment and professional opportunities at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. There are over 600 co-curricular, cultural and educational organizations from which students can choose. Examples include:

  • ACLU Law Student Group
  • Adaptive Sports Club
  • Agricultural Education Club
  • AHC Multicultural Society
  • Animal Science Graduate Club
  • Biological Science Research Club
  • Black Motivated Women
  • Cardiovascular Disease Interest Group
  • Champions for Christ
  • Disabled Student Cultural Center
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute
  • Fisheries and Wildlife Club
  • Gophers Dairy Club

There are hundreds of others and also a wide variety of fraternities and sororities.

Local Community

There are a wide variety of art galleries and museums in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area that offer free admission.  Meanwhile, other attractions in the Twin Cities metropolitan area offer free admission, as well.  Examples in the area include free attractions such as:

  • Minneapolis Institute of Art
  • Minnesota State Capitol
  • TRACES Museum Center for History and Culture-donation requested
  • Minneapolis Sculpture Garden
  • Minnehaha Depot
  • Museum of Russian Art
  • Bell Museum of Natural History - free only on Sunday

Be sure to check out The Museum Adventure Pass, which is a free pass handed out by libraries in the Twin Cities area.

If you enjoy an adventure, be sure to visit Guthrie Theater. The building is beautiful, has glass floors and fascinating spaces. The Endless Bridge spans the spectacular Mississippi River.  From fly fishing to shopping, fun and nightlife hotspots, there is something for everyone in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area.

Acceptance Rate

56.74

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

The University of South Florida is located in Tampa. It is part of the State University System of Florida and is a public research facility.

History

The University of South Florida was established in 1956, on the site of Henderson Air Field. It was not named until 1957 and students didn't attend until 1960.

Between 1957 and 1970, the University expanded quickly, due to the fact that graduate degree programs began in 1964. Today, the University of South Florida has been dubbed the Harvard of the South. It takes great pride in advancing as a research university.

Academics

The University of South Florida has eighteen colleges, institutions and schools, including:

  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Business
  • College of Engineering
  • Honors College
  • College of Marine Sciences
  • College of Medicine
  • The Confucius Institute
  • School of Music
  • School of Library and Information Science
  • School of Theatre and Dance
  • School of Therapy and Rehabilitation Science

Campuses

The University of South Florida has three satellite campuses. They are:

  • University of South Florida, Lakeland, established in 1988. It offers more than twenty graduate and undergraduate degrees.
  • Sarasota-Manatee, established in 1975. At that time it shared a campus with New College of Florida. A new campus opened in August 2009.
  • St. Petersburg Campus, established in 1965. It is located in downtown St. Petersburg.

Student Life

13% of students that attend the University of South Florida live on campus. Most find it more cost efficient to live off campus in apartments for students. As of 2009, the University of South Florida requires that all freshmen live on campus for the first year of their education. Students who live with parents or guardians in certain counties are exempt, as are students who are 21 years old when the fall semester begins and those who are married or have dependents.

Fraternities and Sororities

The University of South Florida is comprised of a large Greek community. Fraternities and Sororities include:

  • Alpha Phi Alpha
  • Chi Phi
  • Delta Chi
  • Kappa Kappa Psi
  • Sigma Beta Rho
  • Teta Chi
  • Alpha Delta Pi
  • Chi Omega
  • Lamba Theta Alpha
  • Sigma Delta Tau
  • Zeta Tau Alpha

There are numerous other fraternities and sororities as well.

Media

In 1961, the first student newspaper was the Campus Edition of the Tampa Times. When that newspaper became defunct, The Oracle took its place. On September 6, 1966, The Oracle was first published as a weekly. Presently it is published four times weekly. The University of South Florida also has a student radio station. WBUL is located in the Phyllis P. Marshall Center.

Athletics

The Bulls are the University of South Florida's athletic teams. They include:

  • Baseball
  • Golf
  • Football
  • Men's and Women's Basketball
  • Men's and Women's Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Cross country
  • Sailing
  • Volleyball

The University of South Florida joined the Big East Conference in 2005. Herd of Thunder is the athletic band of the South Florida Bulls. It was founded in 1999.

Community

The University of South Florida is at the hub of the Tampa community and strives to make the area of Tampa Bay a better place to live, play and work.

For animal lovers, Busch Gardens is a paradise. Visit the Serengeti Plains, thrill to the wind blowing in your hair as you ride the roller coaster or stop by the Brewmaster's Club. Lowry Park is another must-see for animal lovers.

If you enjoy great entertainment or a night on the town, be sure to visit Channelside entertainment district. Enjoy nightclubs, a 10-screen IMAX Theatre, tasty cuisine at a wide variety of restaurants or do some shopping at the local retail stores.

Be sure to visit Ybor City, northeast of downtown. This historic district was the hub of Tampa's pre-Depression cigar trade and there are many National Historic Sits and Landmarks within its boundaries.

Other activities include golf, mini golf, bowling, swimming, bike riding, botanical gardens, museums, manatee viewing and more. No matter what your interests, you will find something to your liking in Tampa.

Acceptance Rate

47.63

Student to Faculty Ratio

22:1

SUNY at Buffalo is "University at Buffalo - The State University of New York." The University at Buffalo is the flagship institution in the SUNY system, as well as its largest campus. Altogether, there are 64 campuses in the SUNY system.

The University at Buffalo, or "UB," is a top public research university.  It is known for academic excellence, as well as its culture of creativity and resourceful thinking.  UB offers more than 100 undergraduate degrees, 205 master's degrees, 84 doctoral degrees and 10 professional degrees.

The distinguished faculty members of UB have contributed to many innovative inventions, including pattern recognition software, the PSA test for prostate cancer, photodynamic cancer therapy, and an implantable battery-operated cardiac pacemaker, among many others.

SUNY alumni from all 64 campuses include many notable figures, including a leading NASA astronaut, the prime minister of Somalia, a Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist, the cofounder of Miramax Films, CEOs of Paramount Pictures, J. Crew and many other leaders from well-known organizations.

History

SUNY at Buffalo was founded in 1846 as the very first institution of higher education in the State University of New York system.

Academics

The academic calendar of SUNY at Buffalo, or UB, follows the semester format.  It has fall and spring semesters, and a few, shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • The School of Architecture and Planning
  • The College of Arts and Sciences
  • The Graduate School of Education
  • The School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • The School of Law
  • The School of Management
  • The School of Social Work
  • The Academic Health Center (AHC), a consortium of five health sciences schools:
    • Dental Medicine
    • Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
    • Nursing
    • Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Public Health and Health Professions
    • Roswell Park Cancer Institute Graduate Programs

Student Life

The UB activities and opportunities for involvement at UB are numerous.  The school offers excellent facilities for health and wellness, as well as top venues for arts and culture, including The Center for the Arts and Lippes Concert Hall. These venues host many concerts and performances by students and faculty, and also attract premier guest artists from around the world.

Traditions

The UB school mascot is "Victor E. Bull."

Athletics

The UB athletic teams compete in 20 intercollegiate sports at the Division I level, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Track & Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Rowing
  • Softball
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The University of Buffalo, or SUNY at Buffalo, has three campuses:

  • North Campus (Amherst, New York)
  • South Campus (Buffalo, New York)
  • Downtown Campus (Buffalo, New York)

More than 10 percent of UB students study abroad, via exchange programs with 65 universities around the globe.

Community Life

The "Our Impact" program at SUNY at Buffalo reaches out to the community of the Buffalo Niagara region in a variety of ways.  The UB is an integral partner in programs that improve the region and enrich the community including involvement in programs for youth, local businesses, housing and healthcare.

Acceptance Rate

61.08

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

Quinnipiac University provides a variety of program options for students to guide them in their growth and development. The school is located in Hamden, CT and operated as a private institution. Nearly eight thousand students enroll at Quinnipiac University yearly.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs Quinnipiac University offers:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Psychology
  • Communications And Journalism

Students applying for admission are usually asked to submit an application, transcripts, records, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the school. The most common test scores among students accepted to Quinnipiac University are within the range of 22 to 26 for the ACT exam, or 1500 to 1780 on the SAT exam. This school has an acceptance rate of around 63 percent of which only 13 percent decided to enroll. More information on admissions can be found at quinnipiac.edu.

Tuition is approximately $40,000 per year, though it may change based on different types of circumstances. Students should visit the school's net price calculator to determine a more personalized cost estimate. Some students at this school may be eligible for financial aid, which is typically offered as scholarships, grants, and loans.

The mascot for Quinnipiac University is the "Bobcats", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through oversight by the NCAA. Sports available:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AAA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AAA)

Acceptance Rate

70.12

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

Thomas Jefferson University is a nonprofit private college that has a large number of degree programs available for students to choose from. The school is located in Philadelphia, PA, in a predominantly urban area. Nearly three thousand students enroll at Thomas Jefferson University annually.

Areas of study available at Thomas Jefferson University include:

  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Biological And Biomedical Sciences
  • Liberal Arts And Sciences

To be considered for admissions, applicants may be required to fill out an application, write a personal statement, and submit school transcripts, which are then studied by the admissions office.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is close to $35,000, but may change yearly. Students are encouraged to visit the school's net price calculator to better estimate their cost of attendance. The price of on-campus housing is around $3,800 per year. This school may provide financial aid for students that are eligible as grants and loans.

Students can visit the school's http://www.jefferson.edu to see additional information.

Acceptance Rate

65.88

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

MSU provides a variety of educational opportunities for students to assist them in their growth and development. The school is located in Mississippi State, Mississippi and publically funded. As a land grant institution this school is one of the larger public institutions in the state of Mississippi. MSU enrolls nearly 20,000 yearly, making it one of the largest schools in the state.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs MSU offers:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Education
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Communications And Journalism
  • Psychology

To be considered for admissions, students may be required to complete an application, write a personal statement, and submit school transcripts, which are then evaluated by the admissions staff. Students may take either the ACT or SAT exam scores to be considered for admissions to this school. A score between 970 - 1235 on the SAT, or 20 - 27 for the ACT is usually submitted among admitted students. Approximately 60% of all students that applied were admitted at this school, with 47% of those accepted choosing to attend. More information from the admissions office can be found here.

The tuition at this school varies based on the state of residence of the student. In-state residents pay nearly $6,400 per year, while out-of-state residents are charged $16,000 annually. The price of on-campus housing is about $5,100 for the year. This school may help with costs by offering financial aid for students that are eligible by way of scholarships, grants, and loans.

Athletic programs are available at MSU through the NCAA, allowing students to compete in intercollegiate sports. Athletic programs available include:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-A)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-A)

Students who would like to view more about MSU can check out their website at http://www.msstate.edu/.

Acceptance Rate

53.86

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Auburn University in Alabama is one of the few educational institutions in the United States that is designated as a land, sea and space grant university. Auburn University offers more than 140 academic degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels. With 13 colleges and schools on its campus, Auburn University is one of the largest in the South. It offers a comprehensive curriculum that blends the arts and applied sciences.

Auburn University has nationally-ranked programs in architecture, pharmacy, engineering, veterinary science, and business, among others.

History

Although it is now a large public research university, Auburn University began as a small private liberal arts institution in 1856. The school has had four different names through its history:

  • East Alabama Male College (1856-72)
  • Agricultural and Mechanical College (1872-99)
  • Alabama Polytechnic Institute (1899-1960)
  • Auburn University (1960-present)

The school closed from 1861 to 1866 due to the Civil War. Women were first admitted to the previously all-male college in 1892. In 1967, the Auburn Montgomery campus was established.

Academics

The academic calendar for Auburn University follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summer semesters. There are also two, shorter "mini-sessions" offered in the summer.

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Agriculture
  • Samuel Ginn College of Engineering
  • Graduate School
  • James Harrison School of Pharmacy
  • College of Veterinary Medicine
  • College of Architecture, Design & Construction
  • College of Education
  • College of Human Sciences
  • College of Business
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences
  • College of Sciences and Mathematics
  • College of Liberal Arts

Student Life

There are more than 300 student groups, clubs and organizations available for involvement at Auburn University. There are also many local chapters of national fraternities and sororities on campus, with a very active Greek Life. Students who choose to get involved will develop teamwork, relationships, leadership, and professional skills. The Office of Student Involvement offers more information about how students can find a group that fits their interests.

Traditions

The school colors for Auburn University are orange and blue, and the mascot is the Tiger. "Aubie" the Tiger promotes Tiger athletics at most sports events, and has been voted the top collegiate mascot in the country several times.

The "war eagle" figures into Auburn University's battle cry at sporting events, but is more of a spirit yell than a mascot.

Athletics

Auburn University's "Tigers" athletic teams compete in more than 19 intercollegiate men and women's sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Equestrian
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its Main Campus in Auburn, Alabama, Auburn University has the following satellite campuses:

  • Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station
  • Alabama Cooperative Extension System
  • Auburn University at Montgomery

Community Life

The city of Auburn is small, with a friendly college-town feel. It is located in eastern Alabama, roughly 50 miles east of Montgomery and just over 100 miles southwest of Atlanta, Georgia. Residents enjoy mild winters and a generally warm and sunny climate. Auburn is a "bicycle" city, with bike lanes surrounding the university.

Although it is small, Auburn offers a host of recreational activities and entertainment, including many concerts, clubs and sports events within driving distance. There are many golf courses in the area, including the famous Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail. Chewacla State Park is nearby.

Acceptance Rate

80.67

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

San Jose State University (SJSU) is located in downtown San Jose, California, the heart of what is known as "Silicon Valley" - a busy area for the high-technology industry. The SJSU location is halfway between San Francisco and Monterey, California.  SJSU is one of 23 campuses in the California State University system, and offers more than 134 undergraduate and graduate degrees in 110 concentrations or areas of emphasis.

SJSU boasts many famous and illustrious alumni including author Amy Tan, Olympic medallists Lee Evans and Chuck Adkins, and gorilla researcher and author Dian Fossey, among others.  SJSU is one of the top 200 research universities in the U.S.

History

San Jose State University was founded in 1857 as a frontier school that trained teachers.  Over time it matured into a metropolitan university.

Academics

San Jose State University follows the semester-format academic calendar, with a fall and spring semester.

Colleges and Schools

San Jose State University offers 69 undergraduate and 65 graduate degrees in a full range of majors, with a selection of minors, from its seven colleges and many departments, including:

  • Applied Sciences & Arts
  • Business
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • Humanities & the Arts
  • Science
  • Social Sciences

SJSU also offers many certificate programs.

Student Life

San Jose State University offers its students the opportunity to participate in more than 150 clubs and organizations as well as NCAA athletics. SJSU also offers on-campus access to many student resources including student housing and dining, events, study abroad programs, student advising and learning assistance, career advising, a health center, and more.

Athletics

The SJSU athletics department competes in many intercollegiate sports with its "Spartans" teams, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming/Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Community Life

Students from San Jose State University benefit from the campus's location in the heart of "Silicon Valley" through the many research programs and internships offered at local Silicon Valley companies.  Further, San Jose is a cultural metro center with many opportunities for recreation, arts and entertainment.  It also is conveniently located to San Francisco and coastal cities like Santa Cruz and Carmel.

Acceptance Rate

63.57

Student to Faculty Ratio

26:1

The University of Tennessee (UT) is considered a "research-intensive" institution of higher learning that promotes excellent education, research and public service.  The university co-manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's largest science and Energy lab.

UT was ranked 47th among public universities in the United States by U.S. News and World Report. The University of Tennessee's nuclear engineering, social work, and supply chain management and logistics programs rank particularly high.

UT offers more than 300 academic degree programs at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels.  It is situation on a large, 560-acre campus that is known for its green spaces, nearby lakes and views of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The UT brings many research dollars to the state of Tennessee and prides itself on sharing the collective expertise, creativity and cutting-edge research of its faculty and student body with the local communities.

History

The University of Tennessee was founded in Knoxville in 1794 as Blount College, two years before Tennessee became a state.  The school changed names a few times, becoming the University of Tennessee in 1879.  Initially an all-male college, the first women were admitted as students in 1892.  The university had to close during the Civil War, and its buildings were used by the Confederate army, and later the Union army.  It reopened after the war, becoming a federal land-grant institution.  The UT has continued to grow since then, expanding its program offerings through the years.

Traditions

The University of Tennessee is rich with traditions, and the two most notable traditions are worth mentioning.  The school colors of orange and white, chosen for the orange and white daisies that grew on campus.  Part of the original campus is known as "The Hill," the rising bank above the north short of the Tennessee River, on which Ayres Hall stands.  Ayres Hall was built in 1919.

Academics

The University of Tennessee's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summers semesters, and a shorter "mini-term" that runs from early May until early June.

Colleges and Schools

  • Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
  • Architecture and Design
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Business Administration
  • Communication and Information
  • Education, Health, and Human Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Graduate School
  • Law
  • Nursing
  • Social Work
  • Space Institute
  • Veterinary Medicine

The University of Tennessee also has institutes of Agriculture, Public Service and Space.

Student Life

The University of Tennessee offers many programs and resources to its students, including undergraduate advising, outreach and continuing education, honors programs, distinguished fellowship programs, a student success center, a teaching and learning center, and more.

The UT Knoxville campus offers 12 residential housing options for students.  There are also many dining options on campus.

Students at UT have more than 300 student clubs and organizations to choose from, including service groups, academic clubs, and professional organizations, those focused on politics, religion, sports or other interests.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are more than 26 fraternities and 17 sororities available at the University of Tennessee.  The Dean of Students Office has more information about how to become involved.

Athletics

The UT athletics division has 20 men's and women's varsity teams that compete in intercollegiate sports.  The "Vols" and "Lady Vols" have won many athletics championships.  The "Vols" sports teams include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Knoxville campus is the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee system, which also includes the Chattanooga and Martin campuses, and the UT Health Science Center in Memphis.

Community Life

The University of Tennessee prides itself on being an economic driver in the state.  Its co-management, with Battelle Memorial Institute, of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is one of its key contributions to and collaborations with the local communities.  Additionally, UT has a top campus environmental effort called "Make Orange Green" that is honored across the state.

Acceptance Rate

78.85

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

University of New Hampshire is a public institution that has many degree programs available for students to choose from. The school is located in Durham, NH, in a predominantly suburban area. As a land grant institution this school is among larger public institutions in the state of New Hampshire. Enrollment at University of New Hampshire is nearly fifteen thousand annually. Here is a list of some of the popular programs UNH offers:

  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Psychology
  • English Language And Literature
  • Communications And Journalism
To be considered for admissions, applicants may be asked to fill out an application, provide letters of recommendations, and submit school records, which are then evaluated by the admissions office. Most students at University of New Hampshire scored in a range of 1000 - 1200 on the SAT. Roughly 70 percent of all students that applied were accepted at University of New Hampshire, with 23 percent of those accepted choosing to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found at admissions.unh.edu. The cost of undergraduate tuition is different for in-state and out-of-state residents. In-state residents pay nearly $17,000, while out-of-state residents pay $31,000 per year. Student housing is available on-campus for students. The annual cost of housing is around $6,400. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the required requirements in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs. The UNH "Wildcats" compete in a number of intercollegiate sports through participation in the NCAA. Sports available:
  • Basketball (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Track & Field (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Field Hockey (NCAA Division I-AA)
  • Football (NCAA Division I-AA)
Students who wish to get more about UNH can take a look at their website at www.unh.edu.

Acceptance Rate

84.03

Student to Faculty Ratio

19:1

The University of Missouri (MU), known by students, faculty and locals as "Mizzou," is located in one of America's best college towns: Columbia, Missouri. Mizzou offers more than 280 degrees and many academic programs that are highly ranked including writing, journalism, family and community medicine, and dispute resolution.  MU has 40 degrees that may be completed online.

The faculty at MU includes many award-winning scientists and scholars.  MU is Missouri's largest public research university and is the flagship campus of the University of Missouri System.

The campus of MU is considered to be one of the most beautiful, and its 1,372-acres full of many varieties of trees and plants has been designated a botanic garden.

History

The University of Missouri was founded in 1839.  Located in Columbia, Missouri, it was the first state university in the Louisiana Purchase territory, and the first public university west of the Mississippi River.

Academics

The University of Missouri follows the semester-format academic calendar, with fall and spring semesters and shorter summer sessions.

The UM offers more than 200 degree programs through its 19 colleges and schools, including:

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
  • School of Natural Resources
  • College of Arts and Science
  • School of Music
  • Trulaske College of Business
  • School of Accountancy
  • College of Education
  • School of Information Science and Learning Technologies
  • College of Engineering
  • Graduate School
  • Harry S. Truman School of Public Affairs
  • School of Health Professions
  • College of Human Environmental Sciences
  • School of Social
  • School of Journalism
  • School of Law
  • School of Medicine
  • Sinclair School of Nursing
  • College of Veterinary Medicine

Student Life

There are many services and amenities offered to students at Mizzou including academic advising and career resources, as well as many venues for dining, shopping, meeting, studying, and socializing on campus.  There are many historic and beautiful buildings on campus, and the University Club is a popular choice for fine dining, special events, weddings, meetings, and more.  The Department of Student Life offers many resources and lists of things to do at Mizzou, from guest lectures to learning how to rock climb.

There is campus housing available and residential life is very social at MU. The online portal "MyZou" has a campus housing tab that offers more information about student housing options.

Athletics

Black and Gold are the colors of the Mizzou, or Missouri, "Tigers" athletics teams of the University of Missouri.  The Tigers compete in many intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Track & Field
  • Wrestling

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Community Life

Columbia, Missouri has been named by several publications as one of the best places to live in America for the exceptional quality of life it offers.  For MU students, there is much to do on and off campus, from MU Tiger athletic games to musical performances from the School of Music, or productions from the Department of Theatre, and shopping in town.  There are many museums and art galleries on and off campus, including exhibits at the State Historical Society of Missouri.

Acceptance Rate

80.73

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Top Degrees in Bacteriology

Graduate and undergraduate students interested in a degree in bacteriology will have a number of degree programs to consider.  In fact there are a number of top ranked universities around the country that offer both undergraduate and graduate degrees in medical microbiology and bacteriology.  With so many options to choose from, how do you know which degree program is best for you?

The key to find the perfect degree program for you is taking the time to establish your personal priorities.  Your priorities include academic goals, career objectives, and work/life balance.  We have created a complete guide to help you establish your priorities on pages 3-4 to make your decision-making process more streamlined.

After establishing your priorities, this will guide you to connect with certain types of schools found below to quickly gather admissions information from the best college programs for you.

Bachelor Degrees in Bacteriology

Bachelor’s degrees have been designed to take 4-years of full time matriculation with some programs offering an accelerated path for qualifying students.  Part-time students should expect the program to take longer as a function of pace and course load.  Degrees in medical microbiology and bacteriology will be conferred as a Bachelor of Science (BS) from most accredited colleges and universities.  Undergraduate degrees combine general education courses such as history, English composition, communications, creative writing, sociology, psychology, economics, and philosophy along with core science courses.

A common set of classes in bacteriology will be found at most schools across the country.  Examples of core science courses include the following:

  • Microbial Physiology
  • Fundamentals of Bacteriology
  • Chemistry & Organic Chemistry
  • Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics
  • Pathogenic Bacteriology & Infectious Diseases
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Microbiology
  • Physiology of Microorganisms
  • Organismal Biology
  • Microbial Evolution & Diversity
  • Cell Biology
  • Water Bacteriology
  • Physics
  • Calculus
  • Ecology
  • Biochemical Methods

Master Degrees in Bacteriology

Master degrees in bacteriology will be conferred as a Master of Science (MS) at most universities given the exceptionally heavy emphasis on math and science.  You can expect the degree program to be 2-3 years in length for full-time students.

After meeting all lower-level requirements, graduate students will take a series of rigorous upper-level classes plus approved electives.  Culmination of the MS degree program is the work to create and complete an approved thesis project.  Graduates of a master’s degree will have the opportunity to launch their career or continue their academics to earn another master’s degree in an adjacent field of study or a PhD in bacteriology.

Doctorate Degree in Bacteriology

The doctorate degree pathway in bacteriology is conferred as PhD.  Earning a PhD in biomedical sciences with typically take three to five-years to complete.  At this level, students will typically be able to customize their coursework to fit their unique interest and passion.

Colleges and universities with PhD programs will offer students a vibrant research environment, use-inspired research, cutting-edge technology, top-tier professors, and collaboration with the brightest minds in the field.  Doctorate students will elect to work for universities to teach and perform academic research or find employment in a private or public institution at various organizational levels.

Employment & Bacteriology Specializations

Bacteriology degrees are highly specialized degrees. Students earning a graduate or undergraduate degree in this field will have a special set of skills. Knowledge learned from college classes can be parlayed into a career in bacteriology or similar vocations. Adjacent careers worth considering may include: college professor, specialized research analyst, toxicologist, genomics, medical scientist, immunologist, biomedical engineer, toxicologist, biotechnologist, virologist, gene therapy, cellular biologist, or food scientist.

Microbiology Career Outlook & Job Growth

Careers in bacteriology are slated to grow at a robust 8% clip over the next decade. Similarly, you can expect rapid growth in college professors and biomedical engineers forecast at 13% and 23% respectively. The largest employers of bacteriologists are currently research organizations, medical manufacturing, colleges, and engineering firms. Median income for bacteriologists is $69,960 a year which is nearly twice the national average. Learn more about this rapidly growing field by searching for colleges below.

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