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Palliative Care Nursing is a multidisciplinary field in nursing that specializes in the  medical care of patients with serious illnesses.  A Palliative Care Nursing practitioner will be trained in a variety of means to help provide relief from pain, stress, anxiety, physical stress, and mental stress to improve the quality of a patient’s life.  In the medical community, palliative care is also commonly referred to as symptom management, supportive care, or comfort care.

Palliative care is provided to individuals with a serious life threatening or life-limiting illness.  Care is provided holistically to help not just a patient's disease but rather the whole person in psychological, physical, emotional, and spiritual domains.  The goal with palliative care is the treat and prevent the known side-effects and symptoms of a disease.  Patients may be treated in a formal medical setting such as hospital or outpatient clinic or in an in-home setting under the direction of a licensed medical physician.

Career Summary

MEDIAN SALARY

$75,030

PERCENT ABOVE NATIONAL
INCOME AVERAGE

50.60%

TOTAL SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

56,210

Degree Median Salary vs Adjacent Degree Types

Source: BLS, US Census, and IPEDS

2021 Best Palliative Care Nursing Degree

New York University's main campus is located in Greenwich Village. It is a private, non-sectarian, research university and the largest non-profit institution of higher learning in the US. Study abroad facilities are located in a wide variety of countries around the globe. New sites are planned for Abu Dhabi in 2010 and Washington DC in 2012.

History

New York University was established on April 18, 1831 by bankers, merchants and traders in order to provide young men with a higher education. They were to be admitted on merit alone, with no focus on social status or birthright.

On April 12, 1831, the New York State Legislature gave the school its charter and it was incorporated as the University of the City of New York. The name was changed to New York University in 1896 by popular demand. The first students were welcomed in 1832 and attended classes in rented rooms of Clinton Hall.

Academics

New York University is ranked 22nd of the world's top universities by the Global University Ranking. It is made up of 16 colleges, institutions and schools. When the university was founded, the only school was the College of Arts and Science.

Undergraduate schools include:

  • Education of Human Development
  • Gallatin School of Individualized Study
  • School of Social Work
  • Stunhardt School of Culture
  • Polytechnic Institute of New York University
  • Stern School of Business
  • Tisch School of Arts

Postgraduate schools include:

  • Institute of Fine Arts
  • College of Nursing
  • College of Dentistry
  • Institute of Study of the Ancient World
  • School of Law
  • Courant School of Mathematical Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Continuing and Professional Studies
  • Graduate School of Arts and Science
  • Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

New York University is the only private university in the US with two medical schools, as it also awards the degrees for Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Campuses

New York State University's buildings are situated on approximately 229 acres between 14th Street in the north, Broadway on the east, Avenue of the Americas to the west and Houston Street to the south. Washington Square Park is the core of New York University's buildings and has been since 1970. The Washington Square Arch is the unofficial symbol of the University.

During the 1990s, New York University became a double square university when a second community was established around Union Square. Other campuses and facilities include but are not limited to:

  • Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine
  • New York University Medical Center
  • Belleview Hospital Center

Athletics

New York University's sports teams are known as the Violets. Their colors are violet and white. Dictated by geography and history, Columbia University are their rival. The University's team mascot is the bobcat. Most of New York University's sport teams participate in the University Athletic Association and the NCAA's Division III.

Student Life

The governing student body at New York University is the Student Senators Council. The University has more than 350 clubs and organizations for students on campus. These include fraternities, sororities, sports teams and those that focus on arts, culture and entertainment.

New York University first formed a Greek community in 1837. Greek  life at New York University is governed by four boards.

Community Life

New York is known as The City That Never Sleeps and there is much to see and do. Take in a festival, enjoy nightlife, enjoy a Broadway show or visit Rockefeller Center or Central Park.

There are an abundance of free venues, such as Central Park Stage, Brooklyn Museum, BB King Blues Club and Grill, Studio Museum of Harlem, Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum. Be sure to check times for free admission and also check out other free venues. There's something for everyone in New York City.

Acceptance Rate

16.2

Student to Faculty Ratio

9:1

Case Western Reserve University provides a variety of degree programs for students to guide them in their growth and development. The school is located in Cleveland, Ohio and operated as a private institution. Approximately 9,800 students are enrolled per year at Case.

Here is a list of some of the popular programs Case offers:

  • Legal Professions And Studies
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Engineering

Students applying for admission are most often required to submit an application, school records, test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the admissions staff. Either the ACT or SAT exam must be taken in order to be able to apply to Case Western Reserve University. Scores within the range of 28 - 32 on the ACT or 1830 - 2130 on the SAT are required to greatly increase the chance of admission. Roughly 50 percent of all applicant were admitted at this school, with 13 percent of those admitted choosing to attend. More information regarding admissions can be found here.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is approximately $43,000 per year. Tuition prices may change for a variety of reasons, and therefore students should visit the school's tuition calculator to get a better idea of their costs. The price of on-campus housing is about $7,600 per year. Financial aid may be offered to students that meet the required requirements.

The mascot for Case is the "Spartans", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through the oversight and organization of the NCAA. Athletic programs available may include but not limited to:

  • Baseball (NCAA Division III)
  • Basketball (NCAA Division III)
  • Football (NCAA Division III)
  • Soccer (NCAA Division III)
  • Softball (NCAA Division III)

Contact information, academics information, areas of study, and more can be viewed on school's website at http://www.case.edu.

Acceptance Rate

27.36

Student to Faculty Ratio

11:1

The University of Connecticut (UConn) is the top-ranking public research university in New England, and is considered one of the best universities in the nation. UConn offers undergraduate degrees in more than 100 majors, graduate degrees in 86 areas of research and professional practice, and five professional degrees (J.D., LL.M., M.D., D.M.D., Pharm.D.)

UConn is a Carnegie Foundation Research University, and has a wide range of research activities in more than 100 research centers and institutes. Many of the research outcomes from the UConn drive business development and improve quality of life in the area and beyond.

The faculty at UConn has an excellent reputation, and there are many opportunities for student-faculty collaboration. There are many merit-based scholarships available.

History

The University of Connecticut was founded in 1881 as the "Storrs Agricultural School," thanks to the gift of property and money for equipment and supplies from brothers Charles and Augustus Storrs. The school opened with three faculty members and 12 students.

Later renamed the "University of Connecticut," the university has since grown to include 13 schools and colleges at its main campus in Storrs, as well as five regional campuses throughout Connecticut, and Schools of Law and Social Work in Hartford, and Schools of Medicine and Dentistry in Farmington.

Academics

The academic calendar for the University of Connecticut follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, as well as summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • School of Business
  • School of Dental Medicine
  • Neag School of Education
  • School of Engineering
  • School of Fine Arts
  • Graduate School
  • School of Law
  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • School of Medicine
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Pharmacy
  • Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture
  • School of Social Work

Student Life

There are more than 400 student clubs and organizations on campus at the UConn, with many different interests represented. Students who wish to start their own student organization at UConn are encouraged to do so. There are many opportunities for involvement in leadership, community outreach and service, student government, intramural sports, cultural groups, and more. There are also many local chapters of national fraternities and sororities that are active on the UConn campus.

There are many student services available on the UConn campus, including career services, counseling and mental health services, health services, international affairs, study buddy program, and more.

On campus living is available, as well as a range of dining services.

Traditions

The UConn school colors are blue and white, and the school mascot is the husky dog.


Athletics

The UConn "Huskies" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Ice Hockey
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Ice Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main campus in Storrs, Connecticut, the University of Connecticut has five regional campuses in the cities of Avery Point, Greater Hartford, Stamford, Torrington and Waterbury. Additionally, UConn has a School of Law and Graduate Business Learning Center in Hartford, a School of Social Work at its Greater Hartford Campus, and a Health Center in Farmington.

Community Life

Public engagement is a major component of the University of Connecticut's mission. The university supports and encourages public service among its faculty and students, and has many outreach, service-learning and partnership programs and activities. UConn regularly collaborates with local businesses and organizations to make improvements that positively impact daily life in the metro areas around the Northeast and other regions.

Acceptance Rate

49.42

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

George Washington University (GW) is located in the heart of Washington, D.C., a short distance from the White House. Students and faculty of GW have the opportunity to work on projects alongside leaders of politics, science, law and many other disciplines. Students also have the opportunity to intern on Capitol Hill, or attend national events and listen to world leaders speak. The commencement ceremonies for graduates are held on the National Mall.

The three major campuses of GW University are the Foggy Bottom Campus and Mount Vernon Campus in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Virginia. All the campuses offer excellent facilities, including a library system that houses more than two million volumes, and opportunities to attend professional sports events, headline entertainment, top art exhibits, and more. Off campus and distance learning is also available through online courses.

The GW alumni are internationally recognized, and include former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Arnold "Red" Auerbach, former coach of the Boston Celtics, actors Alec Baldwin and Kerry Washington, and more than 50 Fulbright scholars, among others.

GW University offers hundreds of options for academic majors and minors at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Students can choose their major and minor from among the following academic interest areas:

  • Business & Management
  • Engineering & Technology
  • Health, Medicine & Nursing
  • History & Government
  • International Studies
  • Literature & Language
  • Media, Journalism & Communication
  • Professional Studies
  • Religion & Philosophy
  • Science & Mathematics
  • Security and Public Safety
  • Social & Human Behavior
  • Visual & Performing Arts

History

The George Washington University was founded in 1821 as "Columbian College" through an Act of Congress. It was established in response to George Washington's vision of an institution in the nation's capital that would educate and prepare its future leaders. Washington died before his vision was realized, but President James Monroe and others were committed to carrying out the venture. The university opened with three faculty members and 30 students enrolled.

Now the largest university in the District of Columbia, GW is comprised of three campuses: Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses in D.C., and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. GW also has several graduate education centers in the D.C. area.

Academics

The academic calendar for the George Washington University follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and multiple shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges and Schools

  • Columbian College of Arts & Sciences
  • School of Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Law School
  • School of Engineering & Applied Science
  • Graduate School of Education & Human Development
  • School of Business
  • Elliott School of International Affairs
  • School of Public Health & Health Services
  • College of Professional Studies
  • School of Nursing

Student Life

There are more than 300 student clubs, groups and organizations for GW University students to get involved in. Student engagement at GW is high, and when students aren't participating in some of the many community service or leadership events or hands-on learning labs or partnerships available through local organizations, there is plenty to do to engage students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds. GW offers a world-class library, state-of-the-art facilities, and a full range of sports, arts and entertainment.

The Washington, D.C., region offers many cultural and outdoor activities as well. The campuses are all well situated in interesting neighborhoods, with easy access to all the metro area has to offer.

Traditions

There are many rich traditions at the GW University, many of them tied to the school's namesake, President George Washington.

The school colors are Blue and Buff (pale gold), and the GW fight song makes reference to these colors:

Hail to the Buff,
Hail to the Blue,
Hail to the Buff and Blue!
All our lives we'll be proud to say,
We hail from GW! (Go Big Blue!)
Oh, by George, we're happy we can say,
We're GW, here to show the way, so
Raise high the Buff!
Raise high the Blue!
Loyal to GW
You bet we're
Loyal to GW!
Fight!

Athletics

The George Washington University "Colonials" athletic teams compete in 22 intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Water Polo 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo

Satellite Campuses

The GW University has three major campuses: the Foggy Bottom Campus in the "Foggy Bottom neighborhood in the heart of Washington, D.C.; the Mount Vernon Campus in the wooded "Foxhall" neighborhood on the former site of Mount Vernon College; and the GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Virginia - an area known for its focus on technology research.  Each campus has a distinct ambiance with integrated services and amenities.

In addition to its three major campuses, GW has education facilities throughout the region of Washington, D.C., that serve as centers for graduate professional studies programs.

Community Life

Students at all three main GW campuses enjoy great neighborhoods. The Foggy Bottom Campus is located in 18 city blocks of the "Foggy Bottom" neighborhood, known for its low-rise brick and brownstone buildings and streets lined with trees.

Students on the Mount Vernon Campus will enjoy a quieter setting on 23 acres within a wooded residential area.

Students at GW are very likely to be involved in community activities and service, contributing to hundreds of organizations from non-profits to politics. Students in the GW athletics department are active volunteers of community organizations, including motivational presentations to local high school groups, clean-up activities at local parks and facilities, assisting local youth sports, and more.

Acceptance Rate

40.84

Student to Faculty Ratio

13:1

The University of Tennessee (UT) is considered a "research-intensive" institution of higher learning that promotes excellent education, research and public service.  The university co-manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's largest science and Energy lab.

UT was ranked 47th among public universities in the United States by U.S. News and World Report. The University of Tennessee's nuclear engineering, social work, and supply chain management and logistics programs rank particularly high.

UT offers more than 300 academic degree programs at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral levels.  It is situation on a large, 560-acre campus that is known for its green spaces, nearby lakes and views of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The UT brings many research dollars to the state of Tennessee and prides itself on sharing the collective expertise, creativity and cutting-edge research of its faculty and student body with the local communities.

History

The University of Tennessee was founded in Knoxville in 1794 as Blount College, two years before Tennessee became a state.  The school changed names a few times, becoming the University of Tennessee in 1879.  Initially an all-male college, the first women were admitted as students in 1892.  The university had to close during the Civil War, and its buildings were used by the Confederate army, and later the Union army.  It reopened after the war, becoming a federal land-grant institution.  The UT has continued to grow since then, expanding its program offerings through the years.

Traditions

The University of Tennessee is rich with traditions, and the two most notable traditions are worth mentioning.  The school colors of orange and white, chosen for the orange and white daisies that grew on campus.  Part of the original campus is known as "The Hill," the rising bank above the north short of the Tennessee River, on which Ayres Hall stands.  Ayres Hall was built in 1919.

Academics

The University of Tennessee's academic calendar follows the semester format, with fall, spring and summers semesters, and a shorter "mini-term" that runs from early May until early June.

Colleges and Schools

  • Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
  • Architecture and Design
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Business Administration
  • Communication and Information
  • Education, Health, and Human Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Graduate School
  • Law
  • Nursing
  • Social Work
  • Space Institute
  • Veterinary Medicine

The University of Tennessee also has institutes of Agriculture, Public Service and Space.

Student Life

The University of Tennessee offers many programs and resources to its students, including undergraduate advising, outreach and continuing education, honors programs, distinguished fellowship programs, a student success center, a teaching and learning center, and more.

The UT Knoxville campus offers 12 residential housing options for students.  There are also many dining options on campus.

Students at UT have more than 300 student clubs and organizations to choose from, including service groups, academic clubs, and professional organizations, those focused on politics, religion, sports or other interests.

Fraternities and Sororities

There are more than 26 fraternities and 17 sororities available at the University of Tennessee.  The Dean of Students Office has more information about how to become involved.

Athletics

The UT athletics division has 20 men's and women's varsity teams that compete in intercollegiate sports.  The "Vols" and "Lady Vols" have won many athletics championships.  The "Vols" sports teams include:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Rowing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

The Knoxville campus is the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee system, which also includes the Chattanooga and Martin campuses, and the UT Health Science Center in Memphis.

Community Life

The University of Tennessee prides itself on being an economic driver in the state.  Its co-management, with Battelle Memorial Institute, of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is one of its key contributions to and collaborations with the local communities.  Additionally, UT has a top campus environmental effort called "Make Orange Green" that is honored across the state.

Acceptance Rate

78.85

Student to Faculty Ratio

17:1

Daemen College is a nonprofit private institution that has many majors available for students to choose from. The school is located in Amherst, NY, in a predominantly suburban area. Daemen College has an annual student enrollment of approximately 3,000.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Education
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Business And Marketing Studies

Students applying for admission are usually required to submit an application, transcripts, standardized test scores and any requested personal statements, which will then be reviewed by the admissions committee. 60% of those who apply are accepted to Daemen College, of which 31% choose to attend. More information from the admissions office can be found at daemen.edu.

The cost of tuition is around $25,000, but may change from year to year. Students are encouraged to visit the school's tuition calculator to better estimate their personal tuition costs. The price of on-campus housing is approximately $8,500 annually. Students at Daemen College may be eligible for aid which is generally grants and loans.

The mascot for Daemen College is the "Wildcats", and they participate in intercollegiate athletics through oversight by the NAIA. Athletic programs available may include the following:

  • Basketball (NAIA Division II)
  • Golf (NAIA Division II)
  • Soccer (NAIA Division II)

Students can visit the website to get a complete list of academic programs offered, financial aid details, and more that is available at this school.

Acceptance Rate

61.56

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

Grand Valley State University (GVSU) is a public research university in Allendale, Michigan, with additional campuses in Grand Rapids and Holland. GVSU has learning centers in Muskegon and Traverse City. GVSU has been voted one of "America's Best Colleges" and offers more than 200 areas of academic study. It has more than 80 undergraduate degree programs and 29 graduate degree programs. There is an emphasis on liberal arts at GVSU, and the school's excellent academic programs have earned it top rankings.

History

In 1958, a study by Dr. John Russell determined the need for a new four-year college in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. Many locations were considered for a campus, and Allendale was identified in the early 1960s. In 1963, the Grand Valley State College was opened with 226 students enrolled.  The student enrollment increased significantly over the years as the curriculum and campus expanded, and the school was eventually renamed "Grand Valley State University.

Academics

The academic calendar for Grand Valley State University follows the semester format, with fall and "winter" semesters and a summer term.

Colleges and Schools

  • The College of Community and Public Service
  • The College of Education
  • The College of Health Professions
  • The Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies
  • The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS)
  • The Kirkhof College of Nursing
  • The Padnos College of Engineering and Computing
  • The Seidman College of Business

Student Life

Grand Valley students have more than 300 student organizations to choose from on campus, covering such interests as academic, professional, intramural sports, culture, faith, media, performing arts, volunteer service, and more. Greek life at GVSU is very active, with several local chapters of fraternities and sororities active on campus.

Many campus and area events are posted through the GVSU Office of Student Life or the University Promotions Office. There is an Arts Calendar available for those who wish to attend music or theatre performances, or attend art exhibits and galleries.

Student services available on campus at GVSU include academic advising, affirmative action, disability support services, career services, athletic/recreation facilities, a children's center, health center, counseling center, and more.

There are many options for campus housing available, as well as a variety of dining options or campus restaurants.

Traditions

The traditional school colors for GVSU are blue, white and black. The GVSU mascot is "Louie" the Laker, a nautical character. Prior to the inception of "Louie" the Laker as a mascot for GVSU in 1996, the school and the "Lakers" athletic teams were represented by a mascot dressed in the Old Man and the Sea costume, or other nautical costumes.

Athletics

The GVSU "Lakers" athletic teams compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its Allendale campus, GVSU has several satellite campuses and learning centers in Michigan, including:

  • Richard M. DeVos Center
  • L.V. Eberhard Center
  • Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences
  • Muskegon Regional Center at the Stevenson Center for Higher Education at Muskegon Community College
  • Annis Water Resources Institute Lake Michigan Center
  • Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center
  • Meijer Campus in Holland
  • Traverse City Regional Center at the NMC University Center 

Community Life

Community engagement is fostered at GVSU through its Community Service Learning Center (CSLC). In collaboration with other areas at GVSU, students can volunteer to help the community through programs such as the Non-Profit Volunteer and Internship Fair, Make A Difference Day, Community Outreach Week, and an Overnight Service Program. Other community programs include an annual blood drive.

Michigan's West Coast area offers many recreational activities for students and visitors. There are many favorite beaches around the lakeshore, with many routes for scenic driving trips around Grand Rapids, and many beach towns and traditional midwestern villages.

Acceptance Rate

83.02

Student to Faculty Ratio

16:1

Madonna University provides a variety of degree programs for students to aid them in their growth and development. The school is located in Livonia, MI and operated as a private institution. The Roman Catholic affiliation at the school is an important part of the history, education and curriculum that defines the school. Madonna University has an annual student enrollment of around four thousand.

A list of some of the more popular programs offered are:

  • Education
  • Security And Protective Services
  • Health And Clinical Professions
  • Business And Marketing Studies
  • Public Administration And Social Services
  • Psychology

The admissions process begins with the submission of an application, student records, and test scores, which are then evaluated by the admissions staff. Either the SAT or ACT exam can be taken in order to be able to apply to Madonna University. Scores within the range of 20 to 25 on the ACT or 1020 to 1880 on the SAT are needed to increase the chance of acceptance. Madonna University accepts about 70% of students applying annually. Of those applicants accepted, nearly 35% registered for enrollment. More information on admissions can be found at madonna.edu.

The cost of undergraduate tuition is close to $16,000 annually. Tuition prices may change for a variety of reasons, and that is why students should use the school's tuition calculator to get a better idea of their cost of attendance. Housing may be available for those that would like to live on-campus for around a cost of $3,700 annually. Students enrolled at Madonna University may qualify for aid which is generally loans, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

The mascot for Madonna University is the "Crusaders", and they participate in intercollegiate athletic programs through the oversight and organization of the NAIA. Available athletic programs offered may include:

  • Baseball (NAIA Division II)
  • Basketball (NAIA Division II)
  • Golf (NAIA Division II)
  • Soccer (NAIA Division II)
  • Softball (NAIA Division II)

Students may visit the school's http://www.madonna.edu to see additional information.

Acceptance Rate

74.6

Student to Faculty Ratio

12:1

Kent State University is a public research university, and one of the largest university's in the state of Ohio, comprised of eight campuses. Kent State offers high-quality bachelor's degree programs, as well as innovative graduate studies and research at the master's and doctoral degree levels. The Kent Campus is the university's main location, which offers on-campus housing and state-of-the-art facilities. Kent State's seven other campuses, located throughout Northeastern Ohio, are small liberal arts colleges. These regional campuses offer associate and bachelor's degrees, many with a technical or vocational focus, along with a few select graduate programs.

Kent State University offers 255 academic programs at the bachelor's degree level, 39 programs at the master's degree level and 21 programs at the doctoral level.  KSU has an award-winning faculty, with many renowned scholars and researchers leading programs in its institutes, centers and research departments. The KSU Liquid Crystal Institute leads research in technologies that are used around the world in laptops, flat screen televisions and calculators. Among KSU's notable alumni are 11 Pulitzer Prize winners who completed their studies at Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

History

Kent State University was founded as a teacher training school called "Kent State Normal School" in Kent, Ohio in 1910.  Sixty years later, in May of 1970, Kent State University made international headlines when a violent on-campus student demonstration held in protest of the Vietnam War drew gunfire from law enforcement that killed four Kent State students. In the years since that time, many events and memorials have been established on campus to honor those who died.

Academics

The academic calendar for KSU follows the semester format, with fall and spring semesters, and multiple shorter summer "sessions."

Colleges, Schools and Programs

  • College of Architecture and Environmental Design
  • College of the Arts
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Business Administration
  • College of Communication and Information
  • Office of Continuing and Distance Education
  • College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services
  • College of Nursing
  • College of Public Health
  • College of Technology
  • School of Digital Sciences
  • Honors College 

Interdisciplinary Programs

  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Financial Engineering
  • Information Architecture and Knowledge Management

Other Programs

  • Aerospace Studies/Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corp (AFROTC)
  • Military Science/Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
  • Police Academy 

Regional College Programs

  • Research and Sponsored Programs
  • Graduate Studies
  • Undergraduate Studies

Student Life

Kent State is known for its student involvement, both historically and in recent years, and currently offers more than 200 student organizations for student participation. Student activities and organizations include everything from leadership programs, to community service, cultural awareness, sororities and fraternities, arts and theatre, sports and fitness, and more.

KSU student services include health and wellness services, housing, transportation, dining options, and a career services center, among others.

Traditions

The school colors for KSU are blue and gold. The school motto at sporting events is "get your gold on." The KSU mascot is "Flash," a Golden Eagle, and the sports teams are referred to as the "Golden Flash."

Athletics

The "Golden Flash" athletic teams of KSU compete in several intercollegiate sports, including:

Men's Sports:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Track and Field
  • Wrestling 

Women's Sports:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball

Satellite Campuses

In addition to its main Kent Campus, Kent State University has seven satellite campuses in the Northeastern Ohio region, including campuses at Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

Community Life

The city of Kent, Ohio is one of the largest cities in the county. It has been nicknamed "Tree City, USA," for its abundance of trees, parks and gardens. Located 10 miles east of Akron along the Cuyahoga River, Kent has the ambiance of a small town, but the amenities of a big city. The "Festival of Trees" is one of many festivals held in the city throughout the year.

There are many longtime businesses in Kent, including the world headquarters for many Fortune 500 companies. The city is named for Marvin Kent, who established major railroad stops in the city, which fostered its growth and prosperity in the late 1800s.

Acceptance Rate

85.54

Student to Faculty Ratio

20:1

Pennsylvania State University is located in University Park. It is a state-related, space grant, land grant public research facility. Also known as Penn State, the school has twenty-four campuses in Pennsylvania. University Park is the main and largest campus.

History

On February 22, 1855, Pennsylvania State University was established as the Farmer's High School of Pennsylvania. The name was changed to Agricultural College of Pennsylvania in 1862. In 1863, with the passing of the Morrill Land Grant Act, the school was chosen to be Pennsylvania's only land grand college. Within the next few years, enrolment fell because students were only able to acquire and agricultural education. In 1882, when George Atherton became president, the curriculum was broadened. Engineering studies were then offered. Penn State became one of the ten largest engineering schools in the US.

By the early 20th century, Penn State had grown considerably. In 1936, satellite campuses were established by President Don Hetzel in order to allow students of the Depression era to attend college. Since these students were needed to work at home during that time, without the satellite colleges, they wouldn't have been able to further their education.

School President Milton S. Eisenhower changed the name of the college to Pennsylvania State College in 1953 and the institution became state-related in 1970.

Campuses

The University Park campus has 13 distinct colleges. They are:

  • College of Health and Human Development
  • College of Arts and Architecture
  • College of Agricultural Studies
  • College of Communications
  • College of Liberal Arts
  • College of Information Science and Technology
  • Penn State Dickinson School of Law
  • Smeal College of Business
  • Schreyer Honors College
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Education
  • Eberly College of Science
  • College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

Academics

Since 1945, the Applied Research Lab has partnered with the United States Department of Defense. Research is primarily in support of the US Navy.

The library system of Pennsylvania State University began with 1500 book. Today it houses 500,000 maps, 5.2 million books, 180,000 films and videos and 5 million microforms.

Pennsylvania State University's University Park campus also hosts a Radiation Science and Engineering Center.

Student Life

Pennsylvania State University has one of the largest Greek communities in the US. In 1888, the Penn State Glee Club was founded. It is the oldest student organization on campus. Each year the Glee Club takes a spring break tour, which has taken them to a multitude of destination world-wide.

The Penn State Paranormal Research Society has earned an abundance of media attention in recent years. The A&E Network is working with the university to develop a reality series. Some filming will be done on campus.

Each year in February, students take place in the Penn State Dance Marathon. Millions of dollars are raised annually for pediatric cancer care and research.

Media

Penn State's student newspaper is The Daily Collegian. Since 1996, an online version called The Digital Collegean has appeared online.

Radio station WKPS-FM was founded in 1995.  It broadcasts from the ground floor of the HUB-Robeson Center. It serves the State College and Penn State communities.

Athletics

At one time a type of mountain lion roamed the University Park area. The Penn State mascot is the Nitany Lion. Some Penn State teams include:

  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Basketball
  • Volleyball
  • Lacrosse
  • Fencing
  • Women's rugby
  • Boxing
  • Gymnastics

Community Life

There is much to see and do in the University Park area. Take in the Arboretum at Penn State, which is also known as H.O. Smith Botanical Gardens.

Visit Penn State University creamery, also known as Berkey Creamery. Enjoy an ice cream or sherbet or purchase delicious cheese, all produced by the Department of Food and Science.

Take in a football game at Beaver Stadium or enjoy a basketball game at Bryce Jordan Center. Whatever you chose, there is a wide variety of attractions and events in the University Park area. Be sure to check for dates and times.

Acceptance Rate

-

Student to Faculty Ratio

14:1

How To Become a Palliative Care Nurse

In order to become a palliative care nurse or hospice nurse, you will need the proper education and work experience. From an academic and practical standpoint, you will need to have a:

  1. Nursing license in good standing
  2. ADN or BSN degree, or higher (LVN or LPN may work, case-by-case)
  3. Successfully pass the NCLEX examination

Individuals who have worked with geriatric patients, late-stage oncology patients, and/or patients with heart disease are well equipped to become a palliative care nurse. Hospice nurses and palliative care nurses will need possess strong communication skills, attention to detail, and substantive empathy for patients under your care.

Additionally, the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association has stated that many hospice providers will require a year of nursing experience in acute care or demonstrable competency visa vi professional certifications in hospice or palliative care.

Palliative Care Nursing Degrees and Certifications

Accredited colleges and universities offer palliative nursing care degrees and hospice care programs. Make sure to invest the time researching programs within a specific school to learn the most current set of subspecialties for palliative care nursing by visiting any of the schools listed below.

These Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) programs are most often offered as a specialty within a colleges nursing school at different levels. For example, specialties for palliative care nursing within a Masters of Science in Nursing (MSN) program can include programs like:

  • Adult Nurse Practitioner
  • Adult-Gerontological Primary Care Nurse Practitioner in Palliative Care
  • Clinical Nurse Specialist-Adult Health
  • Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner
  • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner - Hospice & Palliative Care Specialties
  • Advanced Practice Adult Oncology & Palliative Care
  • Family Nurse Practitioner
  • Adult-Gerontological Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

 

In terms of certifications, a number of different options exist for hospice care nurses and palliative care nurses. The Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center (HPCC) offers 7 different types of certifications including:

  1. Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (ACHPN)
  2. Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (CHPN)
  3. Certified Hospice and Palliative Pediatric Nurse (CHPPN)
  4. Certified Hospice and Palliative Licensed Nurse (CHPLN)
  5. Certified Hospice and Palliative Nursing Assistant (CHPNA)
  6. Certified Hospice and Palliative Care Administrator (CHPCA)
  7. Certified in Perinatal Loss Care (CPLC)

Palliative care nursing certification and hospice nursing certification is valid for 4 years and renewal of the certification requires a specific number of points or hours be earned via professional development activities or approved work settings.

Palliative Care Nursing Education Requirements

In terms of educational requirements, a palliative care nurse will be required to take a number of science-based classes. The core curriculum will vary from program to program but will generally include keystone courses to help build a solid foundation for palliative care nurses of all types.

What Will I Learn as a Palliative Care Nurse?

The U.S. Department of Labor recently conducted a study of palliative care nurses and hospice nurses to understand their daily functions and job responsibilities. As such, students and working professionals will need to master the following items to successfully work as a hospice nurse or palliative care nurse.

  • Advocating and educating patients
  • Communicate and navigate end-stage diseases
  • Managing ethical & legal considerations
  • Making community resources available to patients
  • Managing pain & disease symptoms
  • Extend empathy and care to patients and their families of all backgrounds
  • Understanding the practical and psychological aspects of loss & grief
  • Supporting family members with bereavement care
  • Integrating into an interdisciplinary medical care team for the benefit of the patient

Where Do Palliative Care Nurses Work?

Hospice nurses and palliative care nurses work in a broad array of settings depending on where the patient resides. The work settings can include: hospitals, clinics, private homes, nursing facilities, nursing homes, and adult care facilities.

Outside of the home, it is most common to see palliative care nurses working in settings that help treat patients with chronic care issues or where they live. When given the choice, an overwhelming percentage of patients will choose to have palliative nurses come to them in their home in lieu of traveling to a hospital or medical facility.

Employment & Palliative Care Careers

Palliative care nursing is a broad field with various career options. Students earning a nursing degree in palliative care can seek direct-hire employment arrangements or seek similar career paths.

A direct-hire is essentially moving directly from college to a designated employer in a full-time position. Employers typically provide training while in school to help students quickly make the transition from school to work.

Alternatively, palliative care nurses can pursue employment opportunities in similar fields in the healthcare industry. Examples of similar careers requiring similar latent skills include: nursing psychiatry, medical counseling, nursing assistant, RN, occupational therapy, health service manager, EMT, physician assistant, physical therapy, and hospice care.

Palliative Care Nurse Jobs & Salary

Projected job growth for palliative care nurses and hospice care is well above the median average in the U.S.  In fact, the jobs within hospice care are some of the most in-demand jobs in the country for the coming decade.

More specifically, the BLS estimates an aggregate 22% growth or approximately 4 million new jobs created in the next ten years in hospice care.  An aging population with greater access to quality care will result in more services and more service providers in this domain.

Palliative care nurse salary numbers will vary from region to region given the demand, work experience, and employment arrangement.  However, the average palliate care nurse salary is approximately seventy-thousand dollars a year.

Nurse assistants and medical service managers will average $28,540 and $98,350 a year on average respectively.  Dive deep into schools of interest and gather information to help you make a quality decision about your future in healthcare.

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